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Open Thread 2 - 15 Oct

by Bjinse Tue Oct 3rd, 2017 at 07:31:24 PM EST

So many threads, so little time


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Collusion to do WHAT?
US Library of Congres | Frequent Reference Question: How Many Federal Laws Are There?
In a project that lasted two years, the Department compiled a list of approximately 3,000 criminal offenses [1982]... "this effort came as part of a long and ultimately failed campaign to persuade Congress to revise the criminal code, which by the 1980s was scattered among 50 titles and 23,000 pages of federal law."

Add to this state, county, and municipal criminal code.

Simple innerboob survey returns 4,500 estimate a/o 2015. Surprising no one, the Heritage Foundation and like minded indivijools appear to be the only citizens willing to take a stab at it, this dimension of civil liberties. I smell opportunity. Mebe I'll make a website to crowd source the piece work, GOOG rate, ha' penny a code number.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Oct 5th, 2017 at 10:21:18 PM EST

source:The Count

2017: 911 so far

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Fri Oct 6th, 2017 at 03:52:25 PM EST
I'd be interested to see how that breaks down between unarmed people shot by police and people who were presenting an immediate threat by firing at police or resisting arrest with gunfire.

And I'd be interested as to whether that number has gone up over the last 50 years. Cos I still believe that black people were slaughtered by police in great numbers long before anybody bothered to start filming them.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Oct 6th, 2017 at 04:28:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
iirc, Guardian's figure was controversial, when first published. WaPoo and LA Times attempted counterfactual estimations. As with Lancet v. Iraqbodycount.com, controversy revolved on data collection methodology (public notice by press story), rather than the arch discovery, some 18,000 US police departments do not keep count.

As for police brutality, or license to murder, toward enemy of the state de jure, I agree with you. It is a constant. What does change though is conception of "the state" -- running the gamut of normative and political behaviors with which ppl identify virtue, "the good life" (Aristotle). A wise UID once remarked,"You don't change an economy simply by changing institutions; attitudes must change first and once that happens institutions will follow."

Today, for the moment, a majority of US americans appear aware that neurotic sensibility just isn't "cool" anymore. Which is not to say, the institutions are in ruins or that attitudes marry conviction.

There is plenty of documentary evidence, for example, of state sanctioned (extra-judicial) "lynching". I've found in the innerboobs images of KKK picnics beneath bodies, images of Fitter Family Contests, newsreel of Truman's promo air-lifts of Puerto Ricans out of poverty, and on and on. I posted such links at calculatedrisk with the subject line "Happy Black History Month" on arbitrarily selected dates of the year. That irritated quite a few.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Mon Oct 9th, 2017 at 02:51:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Europe Could See Another Brexit-Like Rupture--Beyond Spain - Bloomberg Businessweek
Later this month it looks likely the Czechs will have a new Trumpian prime minister--Andrej Babis, a populist billionaire who wants to send Arab immigrants back home and promises to make the government work as well as his businesses do. To be fair to Babis, he's a rather more subtle figure than the American president (not to mention a more successful businessman). ... This brings home the basic fact about all three populists: They're popular.

... Macron complained about people turning a blind eye to Poland and Hungary--and said he would seek sanctions on Poland for infringing EU rules and values while benefiting economically from membership. ... Few French voters would shed tears if less money went to Hungary and it was harder for Polish plumbers to get jobs in Paris. And now Macron wants to push ahead with efforts to integrate the EU, centering on the euro zone, which will enrage the eastern countries that are outside the currency union.

The other personality is Kaczynski. Volatile, paranoid ..., the Polish leader makes Boris Johnson seem rather predictable and easy to handle.



Schengen is toast!
by epochepoque on Fri Oct 6th, 2017 at 09:23:31 PM EST
by das monde on Sat Oct 7th, 2017 at 04:28:41 AM EST
Oh wow, pass that joint.  Me in college, early 1970's; gone forever.  

My allegiance to the human species ends at the California border.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Oct 19th, 2017 at 07:39:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A Harsh Wake-Up Call for Some Brexiteers - The Atlantic
"But then I started to have a sinking feeling," ... Two weeks later, Nigel Farage ... resigned from his position as the head of the UK Independence Party ...; the full weight of her mistake hit her.

... "I never in a million years thought we would actually leave," Oli Hiscocks, a 38-year-old Bregretter from South London, told me. ... But he based his choice on widely accepted predictions that Remain would win. Then the results came in. "I felt physically sick. ... What the hell had we done?"

... He'd never imagined that leaving the EU would make Britain so unattractive to foreign businesses. He also never imagined it would embolden Conservatives MPs like Jacob Rees-Mogg... What has unfolded over the last 15 months, Webb said, is "almost like a horror story."

... Now, Black grasps that Brexit might prevent his children from working in the rest of Europe. Indeed, in the EU, British voters aren't regarded as victims of a dishonest Leave campaign.



Schengen is toast!
by epochepoque on Sun Oct 8th, 2017 at 05:27:01 PM EST
They also never imagined that Italians would take less convenient flights to avoid changing flights in the UK.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Sun Oct 8th, 2017 at 06:52:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A very good article that manages to nail most of the lies and myths over which people voted, although I think that more emphasis could have been laid at the door of the generation long campaign by the right wing press and politicians who have been systematically destroying the reputation of the EU here

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Oct 8th, 2017 at 09:15:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm left by this article with an impression which confirms my impression having only, briefly lived in London, a capitol of deep resignation and cynicism shared. The peoples of the UK been beat down so long --1,000 years, I reckon-- they don't even know which way's up. Vitamin D deficiency ain't a help either.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Oct 9th, 2017 at 04:10:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
As an explainer of brexit, Vit D deficiency has at least the advantage of novelty

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Oct 10th, 2017 at 07:41:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah for me!!!

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Tue Oct 10th, 2017 at 10:20:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
When my innerPollyAnna needs conviction, I listen to the soundtrack. When my innerPollyAnna needs to cry, I watch the film.



Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Wed Oct 11th, 2017 at 02:54:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Vitamin D deficiency ain't a help either.

Let's try, "If only they had a few more blow-jobs every week."

My allegiance to the human species ends at the California border.

by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Oct 19th, 2017 at 07:44:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Coitus is not the answer to the problem of chimpanzee-modeled society of homo sapiens. Or is it?!

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Thu Oct 19th, 2017 at 07:49:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
dKos - Mark sumner - comment on Abbreviated Pundit Round up

We shouldn't be surprised that fiction is winning. We may say "truth is stranger than fiction," but fiction is often more satisfying. After all, fiction has a narrative, a story vector that can connect seemingly unrelated ideas. People like the idea that there is secret writing on the back of their stop signs and that somewhere a council of elders is plotting that one world order. History can seem like just one damn thing after another, while lies--especially ones that tell people they're more important than they may seem, or that apparently important people are really terrible--are much more pleasing.

I have never seen it put more succinctly than this

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Oct 8th, 2017 at 08:13:53 PM EST
From the top:

"truth is stranger than fiction," but fiction is often more satisfying.

Of course it is.  Example: 1979. I'm married, in grad school.  My wife is fucking some ball-bearing salesman she met at work because he promised to buy her 20 acres of land in Sacramento, build a house on the land, a barn ... a beautiful lie ... which she discovered after he dumped her.  A lie is always more attractive than reality.

... somewhere a council of elders is plotting that one world order.

I wouldn't call them elders but you can be damn sure the ultrawealthy are pow-wowing about how to most effectively kill off the 99.99999% and divvy up the world resources.  They're not stupid and have no need for the rest of us.

... apparently important people are really terrible ...

Take a good long look at the Repubs in Congress and most of the clowns in the WH and tell me these "things" aren't really terrible.  Wouldn't be surprised if they were invaders from Planet Nine.

My allegiance to the human species ends at the California border.

by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Mon Oct 9th, 2017 at 02:59:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
More Americans are living alone after recession
the divorce rate has been stable, or even declining, since the 1980s.

Instead, analysts said, the decline in both marriage and partnerships is likely a result of the declining ability of men to earn a salary large enough to sustain a family.

"All signs point to the growing fragility of the male wage earner," said Cheryl Russell, a demographer and editorial director at the New Strategist Press. "The demographic segments most likely to be living without a partner are the ones in which men are struggling the most -- young adults, the less educated, Hispanics and blacks."

[...] "The point at which the average young man becomes `marriageable' appears to be earnings of $40,000 a year or more," Russell said.

British couples too stressed to sleep in the same bed... More than half prefer to sleep alone

by das monde on Sat Oct 14th, 2017 at 08:00:42 AM EST
Democracy is just the cover story, the more important question is what kind of oligarchy are we? Critique is impossible without language and typography, this essay provides it

Guardian - Ganesh Sitaraman - How the oligarchy wins: lessons from ancient Greece

Winters argues that there are four kinds of oligarchies, each of which pursues wealth defense through different institutions. These oligarchies are categorized based on whether the oligarchs rule is personal or collective, and whether the oligarchs use coercion.

Warring oligarchies, like warlords, are personal and armed. Ruling oligarchies like the mafia are collective and armed. In the category of unarmed oligarchies, sultanistic oligarchies (like Suharto's Indonesia) are governed through personal connections. In civil oligarchies, governance is collective and enforced through laws, rather than by arms.

With this typology behind him, Winters declares that America is already a civil oligarchy. To use the language of recent political campaigns, our oligarchs try to rig the system to defend their wealth. They focus on lowering taxes and on reducing regulations that protect workers and citizens from corporate wrongdoing.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Oct 15th, 2017 at 10:46:14 AM EST
*oligarchy, *archy cannot alter the object of discourse which is irreducible oligarchy. Nor does it dispel the category error engrossed by the most invidious neologism of them all; that is to construe, any form of oligarchy is demarchy ("democracy") ... regardless of the exemplary practices purportedly invented in the Golden Age of Greece, the  republic of classical Roman, or the modern-post-industrial-globalized age of social network telecommunication.


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Sun Oct 15th, 2017 at 02:57:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Guardian - Ganesh Sitaraman - How the oligarchy wins: lessons from ancient Greece
At the same time, they sought to destroy monuments that were symbols of democratic success. Instead of public works projects, dedicated in the name of the people, they relied on what we can think of as philanthropy to sustain their power. Oligarchs would fund the creation of a new building or the beautification of a public space. The result: the people would appreciate elite spending on those projects and the upper class would get their names memorialized for all time. After all, who could be against oligarchs who show such generosity?

Possibly related diary:
Why I don't do charity - Jerome - November 2006

Plus ça change, etc...

by Bernard on Sun Oct 15th, 2017 at 04:07:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
a good reminder...

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Oct 20th, 2017 at 06:06:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Very long thread.

by generic on Wed Oct 18th, 2017 at 09:52:16 AM EST
by generic on Wed Oct 18th, 2017 at 09:53:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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