Welcome to the new version of European Tribune. It's just a new layout, so everything should work as before - please report bugs here.

Open Thread 26 June

by Bjinse Mon Jun 26th, 2017 at 09:05:17 PM EST

When we are threading, we are alive


Display:
This week is like that old joke: A man visits its GP, and says, "Doctor, something is very wrong with me, whatever part of my body I poke at, I'm hurting."
The doctor looks up, and concludes after one glance: "That's because you've strained your index finger."

Please chalk all the typo's this week to the loss of a slice of my left index finger to an cheese slicer. Also, any increased incoherence will be blamed on subsequent blood loss. For those who must know, I did not finish eating the sandwich.

Ow. Ow. Ow.

by Bjinse on Mon Jun 26th, 2017 at 09:20:17 PM EST
Commiserations, sorry for your loss.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 27th, 2017 at 01:51:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by generic on Tue Jun 27th, 2017 at 01:25:05 AM EST
Well, he's in a position to report back on that one, having been dead for a decade.

From the man who wrote "Fates worse than death" we have tweets from beyond the grave

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 27th, 2017 at 01:54:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Kurt didn't die, he just became unstuck in time.
by rifek on Mon Jul 3rd, 2017 at 12:17:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Young Turks run the rule over the Ossoff loss. Making a lot more sense than dKos these days



keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 27th, 2017 at 01:50:29 PM EST
Finally someone makes sense of the Georgia by-election and the other three as well. It is more important to the DNC and Congressional Democrats not to offend the big money donors than to run people who can win. Careerism writ large - just as with the Blairites in the UK.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Jun 28th, 2017 at 03:27:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The media is so totally captured that I have yet to hear on cable or broadcast MSM the comparison between the administrative costs of Medicare - a single payer system even if crippled by financial sector imposed rules backed by most Democratic and Republican congressional members - and the 30% of the cost of total US health care delivery taken by private insurance, big pharma and other social parasites.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Jun 28th, 2017 at 03:32:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You can have a system that makes sense or a system that makes money.  Which do you think the US will always opt for?
by rifek on Mon Jul 3rd, 2017 at 12:23:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We really need to reduce the parasites. They are now running things. But doing so is a long odds bet.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Jul 3rd, 2017 at 04:21:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
< wipes tears >
I was wondered idly, how this "autopsy" would incorporate the mystical, preternatural BLACK VOTING BLOC with low voter turnout, as is the custom, in GA 6 (median income $72,832) for the "populist" revival that is um sweeping the nation.


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Wed Jun 28th, 2017 at 01:56:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There are black Democrats in GA 6? Who knew? Black Republicans maybe.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Jun 29th, 2017 at 01:23:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's been easy to make more sense than dKos since dKos went full Clintstone two years ago.  Never go full Clintstone.
by rifek on Mon Jul 3rd, 2017 at 12:21:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, I still check in most days to see what's going on, but I no longer feel the same buzz.

It's worth noting that there was a considerable purge recently of people deemed to be too critical of the Clinton Wall St cabal. I can understand that the whole Bernie-bot vs Hillary thing has become tedious in the extreme, but pointing out that the Corporate compromises which the Democrats prefer is no longer winning friends and influencing voters is hardly the stuff of radical political thought.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Jul 3rd, 2017 at 11:25:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Hill-bots are willing to throw anything and anybody under the bus to maintain control of every seat at the table.  I watched them try it last Summer at our county convention.
by rifek on Mon Jul 3rd, 2017 at 04:22:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I really should write a diary about the coming Austrian election but sadly there are a lot of things I really have to write and I still have no idea what is actually going on anymore.

Fun stuff is happening! The new leader of the conservatives sounds exactly like the leader of the far right and is leading in the polls, the Social Democrats jumped with both legs into the hole Schroeder and Blair dug, the Greens threw their youth organization out of the party under circumstances I don't quite understand and shortly afterward the party leader of many years resigned and their base deselected one of their biggest names, Peter Pilz. Meanwhile the expelled youth organization has announced they will run together with the communists.

by generic on Tue Jun 27th, 2017 at 03:56:46 PM EST
I know how you feel, UK politics is in a similar flux. The moment you think you have a handle on how things lie, something comes along and it's all over the place.

Right now I think it possibly only makes sense viewed from Europe, cos it sure don't make any sense from here

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 27th, 2017 at 05:06:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Interesting you say that.
From a Europe England looks like the epic clusterfuck it is, but then Europe from the inside has similarly huge structural problems.
They both need a radical shake-up, whether still bound at the hip or separately.
Looking at May definitely helps Merkel look less deranged, is that what you mean?
Even Thatcher was a cupcake compared to 'let them burn' Teresa and her jolly crew.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Jun 27th, 2017 at 09:43:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The only way I can connect the dots is by thinking that May is over-seeing an exercise in preventing the Conservative party from splitting apart.

The mad brexiteers like Davis, Redwood and Rees-Mogg and others are truly crazed with free-trade fervour. They cannot be reconciled with reality; theirs is the True Faith that the Commonwealth cannot wait for us to re-impose Foreign, that the EU has a weak hand and will enventually fold so that Mercedes can continue to sell us supercars and...and... oh I give up. they're lunatics.

Equally you have the Right Wing Revolutionaries like Gove who understands that leaving the EU will be catastrophic but this will give the Believuhs the chance to burn it all to the ground and build the new Libertarian Free Trade State. All Hail Ayn Rand.

There's the Republicans who don't care what happens so long as taxes are cut and the rich get richer.

And then there's those who actually understand what's going on and are horrified.

Everything May is doing is a probably doomed attempt to hold these and other minor factions together. No humiliation is too great, no bribe too generous. they are mortgaging theirs and the country's future for a temporary peace in the present.

FSM damn the lot of them

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jun 28th, 2017 at 06:55:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
May does look somewhat chastened since the election, some of the arrogance has gone but she still gives off a doomed feeling of futility.
The deals with N. Ireland are nakedly grubby and reek of desperation, as we all see the tail wagging the dog, a bunch of flat-earther homophobes being used as a band-aid on the double wound of Corbyn's dizzying ascent and her rabid back-benches europhobes.
Europe meanwhile is equally volatile with Italy's banks defaulting, a permanent immigration crisis, and a calibre of onstitutional leadership only a little less dismal than the UK's.
Both entities are seismically quaking, to the point where a year from now they may be unrecognisable.
Both clinging to an antiquated worldview utterly at odds with reality.
What could possibly go right?
With another bigger international financial crash looming?
Syria approaching (another) flash point?
Saudi over-armed hotheads going mad with 50C temperatures making them testier than usual?
Trump going ballistic as his sleazy financial deals come to light, along with his hamfisted efforts to subvert justice, punctuated with self-pitying, paranoid, demented tweets?
Thanks for a great comment, Helen. You summed up the contradictions brilliantly as usual.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Jun 30th, 2017 at 01:09:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
May is in because everyone else sat this dance out.  They could see that the next 2-5 years in No. 10 would be a rocket ride to retirement.  May didn't want to see that the glass slipper they were offering was really a bear trap.
by rifek on Mon Jul 3rd, 2017 at 12:31:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yup she was the only one so blinded with lust for power she took the bait.
Now will she take the Tories down to Davey Jones' locker with her?
Cue sea shanty...
Somebody had a grudge against her in her party and set her up to fail.
(When she was more than capable to sink Britain without any help).
What a headcase.
There's a gruesome kind of resigned pleasure watching her squirm and flail.
Like Trump she reflects the soul of her party.
The next election could be a landslide a la '45. :)  


'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Jul 3rd, 2017 at 10:57:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
 the Social Democrats jumped with both legs into the hole Schroeder and Blair dug
In what has become a standard move...
Joined in the snakepit with Renzi and Hollande.
And now Macron winding up.
Obama and Trudeau well ensconced.
And the mother of them all Hillary Clitoris.  

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Jun 27th, 2017 at 09:54:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Write the diary and leave those issues as questions remaining.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Jun 29th, 2017 at 01:25:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Question for the hive mind. I am looking into doing an online course via a British institution. My income is in JPY. I have the option of paying in full by the end of July, in exchange for a 5% discount, or paying in installments, beginning in August and lasting through next May or so.

Presuming that my own finances are equally capable of taking either course of action, which is more sensible -- take the small discount now, or take the installment payments on the hunch that there will be sufficient devaluation of the GBP in the coming year to make up for the 5% discount I passed?

Right now, its about 140 JPY to 1 GBP, already weaker than the 200 or so it was hanging around last year prior to Brexit, but stronger than the 110 or so it was at earlier this year.

My gut tells me that the pound is in for a pounding as Brexit negotiations continue ... but then again ...

by Zwackus on Fri Jun 30th, 2017 at 01:19:51 AM EST
difficult to know. the only thing we can all agree upon is that the pound will not be getting stronger anytime soon..

I don't know but it might be worth looking to see whether there's a trend line of gradual decline over the last year or a series of sharp falls associated with specific events. If the former, then it might be worth paying in installments. But relyng on catastrophic events may be less reliable.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Jun 30th, 2017 at 06:54:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm putting a big chunk of my savings into a native Euro account.

Short term everyone is expecting a rate rise, which will drive the pound slightly higher.

Medium to long term it's anyone's guess. If Brexit doesn't happen the pound will immediately gain >10%. If it does happen, it will crash through Euro parity and then head for parity with the dollar.

I still can't see the UK economy recovering from Brexit at all. We're primarily a service economy, we're heavily reliant on imports, and if creditors decide we're neither trustworthy nor solvent we have all the ingredients for a major currency crash.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Jun 30th, 2017 at 03:21:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
that's a smart move. I don't have much but I think moving it into euros might be a good idea


keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Jun 30th, 2017 at 04:33:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We're primarily a service economy, we're heavily reliant on imports,

Does it ever occur to anyone here that the fundamental (real) reason for Brexit might be fear of growing bank regulation in the EU putting sand in the City's gears?

I just can't for the life of me come up with any other reason that makes any sense.

Britain produces arms, (probably very dodgy) international legal services, and the City's funny money global laundry service.

What other aces does Britain have up its sleeve?

Does the financial elite instrumentalise immigration xenophobia (a horribly easy exercise) in order to keep manipulating Libor rates, running Barclay's from the Channel Islands and the whole sleazy rest of whatever they're up to on Threadneedle St.?

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Jul 1st, 2017 at 02:30:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think there is a reason for Brexit: it's something that got away from the establishment and they don't know how to get it back. Utter cock-up.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Sat Jul 1st, 2017 at 06:53:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It depends which establishment you're referring to.

Brexit is a hell made by the tabloid right.
It suits the agenda of Murdoch, who knows he can push a UK govt around in a way that the EU simply laughs at.
It serves the Barclays, who own the Telegraph, because its readers are the owners of the land and still believe in a return to a feudalism which the EU would consider illegal. Therefore brexit is a necessary pre-condition for a return to the Empire and English Common Sense deciding the fate of dark people across the globe.
The Mail is the House newspaper for the mad flag waving ultra social conservative nationalist tendencies which is still a mjor part of the Tory coalition.
The Express is like the Mail but for people who think that marmalade is a difficult concept.

Brexit suits these people nicely.

The people who are grounded in reality and want to stop this madness are in a minority amongst the elite. Oddly, I think the City would prefer to avoid brexit but no amount of lobbying money can overcome the populist sentiment driving the Tory party over that cliff.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Jul 2nd, 2017 at 08:57:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
At least you have several parties going over different cliffs.  You can pick your ride.  In the US we have two parties going over the same cliff, albeit a few yards apart.  When they go over, they'll continue debating all the way down until that sudden thud at the bottom.
by rifek on Mon Jul 3rd, 2017 at 12:40:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
UK pound is vulnerable again.

Go for the Jugular:

Druckenmiller walked into Soros's office and told him it was time to move. He had held a $1.5 billion bet against the pound since August, but now the endgame was coming and he would build on the position steadily.

Soros listened and looked puzzled. "That doesn't make sense," he objected.

"What do you mean?" Druckenmiller asked.

Well, Soros responded, if the Schlesinger quotes were accurate, why just build steadily? "Go for the jugular," Soros advised him.



She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Fri Jun 30th, 2017 at 05:48:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
JPY is stronger not weaker today than it was at GBP:JPY, 1:200. That is, GBP buys less JPY than a year ago.

4 July: "The Japanese currency was higher against the euro and the pound, with EUR/JPY down 0.36% at 128.38, after rising to a 16-month high of 128.95 earlier."

20 July close, GBP:JPY, 1:145. The rate opened at 1:111.

Did you "lock in" that rate before paying the bill? Or are you still waiting for JPY depreciate 5% more?

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Fri Jul 21st, 2017 at 03:40:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I know it's difficult to determine if there will be another election this year in the UK. The Tories know they will be beaten quite decisively and so will try to avoid it, but nobody thinks the DUP agreement has any lasting value.

So, everybody is looking for clues. One might be that the Tories are advertising for election workers; something they would not need to do if they were intending to last 5 years

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Jun 30th, 2017 at 06:57:14 AM EST
by generic on Fri Jun 30th, 2017 at 08:09:25 AM EST
Der Postillon has been discussing this in detail.
Große Aufregung in den Geschäftsräumen von CDU und CSU: Nach der Aufhebung des Fraktionszwangs durch Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel suchen hunderte Bundestagsabgeordnete verzweifelt nach ihrem Gewissen, das nun über ihr Abstimmungsverhalten zur "Ehe für alle" entscheiden soll. Viele hatten es offenbar seit Jahren nicht mehr in Benutzung.
Views from the opposition. CSU
Besonders erbittert gegen die Gleichstellung der Homoehe kämpft die CSU. Sie möchte weiterhin am traditionellen Familienbild aus Vater, Mutter, drei Kindern, Geliebter des Vaters und außerehelichem Kind festhalten, wie es etwa von CSU-Chef Horst Seehofer eindrucksvoll vorgelebt wird.
AfD
Die AfD ist gegen die "Ehe für alle", da sie ihrerseits weiter am traditionellen Familienbild aus Führer, heimlicher Geliebter und Schäferhund festhalten will.
The Church
Die katholische Kirche sperrt sich ebenfalls gegen die Gleichstellung. Sie möchte weiterhin am eigenen traditionellen Familienbild aus Vater, Jungfrau, Gott und Kind festhalten.
Finally, Merkel
Die Kanzlerin, die sich früher gegen die Homoehe aussprach, folgt damit ihrer tiefen Überzeugung, ihre tiefen Überzeugungen immer dann über Bord zu werfen, wenn mindestens 60 Prozent der Bevölkerung eine Maßnahme unterstützen.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Fri Jun 30th, 2017 at 08:16:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I look at this photo and I think, "Well, what's worse?  This or a photo of Trump?"  Anybody?

My allegiance to the human species ends at the California border.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Sat Jul 1st, 2017 at 12:17:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Current affairs
I have spent the last year and a half running a small magazine of left-wing political thought called Current Affairs. Our circulation is tiny. We carry no advertising. We have no sponsors. Our revenue comes from selling printed copies through the mail. In other words, we are not exactly the world's most financially lucrative enterprise. It's often a struggle to stay afloat, and we have to be very careful about our expenditures. Nevertheless: when we pay someone to do work for us, we would never pay less than $15 an hour. And if we can do it, any employer can, and anyone who says they can't is lying.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Sun Jul 2nd, 2017 at 09:47:03 PM EST
these are always political decisions.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Jul 3rd, 2017 at 11:26:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Short, Unhappy Life of a Libertarian Paradise - Politico
The residents of Colorado Springs undertook a radical experiment in government. Here's what they got.
[...]

From crisis came a desire for disruption. From disruption came, well, too much disruption. And from that came a full-circle return to professional politicians. Including one--a beloved mayor and respected bureaucrat who was short-listed to replace James Comey as FBI director--who is so persuasive he has gotten Colorado Springs residents to do something the outside world assumed they were not capable of: Five years after its moment in the spotlight, revenue is so high that the same voters who refused to keep the lights on have overwhelmingly approved ballot measures allowing the city to not only keep some of its extra tax money, but impose new taxes as well.

In the process, many residents of Colorado Springs, but especially the men and women most committed to making the city thrive, have learned a few other lessons. That perpetual chaos can be exhausting. That the value of the status quo rises with the budget's bottom line. And that it helps when the people responsible for running the city are actually talking with one another. All it took was a few years running an experiment that everyone involved seems happy is over.

by Bernard on Tue Jul 4th, 2017 at 08:18:56 PM EST
Scientific method reveals "truth" in political theory.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Wed Jul 5th, 2017 at 10:52:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Rugby. British and Irish Lions, on tour in New Zealand. One match each, and it's half time in the deciding match at Eden Park.

I postulate that this is the best Lions team ever. The All Blacks are at their peak, and they are held in check at home. And it's beautiful rugby; I don't care who wins.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Sat Jul 8th, 2017 at 08:27:30 AM EST
Colin Farrel levels the scores, 20 minutes to play...
I'm generally not in favour of Farrel succeeding in his penalties. I'm making an exception today.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Sat Jul 8th, 2017 at 09:02:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That was Owen Farrel, if anone cares. Though Colin is better looking.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Sat Jul 8th, 2017 at 09:14:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You decide.


It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Sat Jul 8th, 2017 at 09:16:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Whoa. 15-15, three minutes to play. A drawn series would be justice, and historic.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Sat Jul 8th, 2017 at 09:24:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yep.

(Outstanding match from the French referee.)

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Sat Jul 8th, 2017 at 09:32:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A useful diary on dKos. Worth a look

dKos - Xaxnar - Enough about Trump, let's talk about his supporters

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Jul 9th, 2017 at 09:27:01 PM EST
This is a very good assessment of the state of the UK economy and how, over decades, UK politicians have taken easy choices that have led us to bad places.

Guardian - Larry Elliot - The UK economy must take a long, hard look at itself

A hung parliament. Inflation going up but growth slowing. A divided nation ill at ease with itself. Welcome back to the 1970s, like now a time when Britain was forced to take a long, painful look at itself.

Make no mistake, this is a good thing. Whether you are in favour of hard Brexit, soft Brexit, clean Brexit or no Brexit, it should be clear that there is something fundamentally wrong with the economy. The same old problems keep surfacing: too small an industrial base; too much debt; too great a geographical divide between the rich south and the rest of the country; too many poorly paid low-productivity jobs.

Ministers boast about the underlying strength of the economy but reach for the wrong 1970s David Bowie reference when they suggest everything is hunky dory. It's more a case of always crashing in the same car.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Jul 10th, 2017 at 03:14:13 PM EST
UK is in the situation as the US.  Can't compete against people happy to earn £10,000/year doing assembly line work and the networks, infrastructure, and knowledge required to do speciality, short-run, and one-off manufacturing has been deliberately destroyed.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Tue Jul 11th, 2017 at 03:24:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
G20-Gipfel vorbei: Deutsche können statt Autos endlich wieder Asylheime anzünden -

Ganz Deutschland ist schockiert nachdem autonome Linksextreme mitten in Hamburg mehrere Autos in Brand gesteckt hatten. Doch heute kann die deutsche Bevölkerung endlich wieder zur Tagesordnung übergehen und ganz normal Asylheime anzünden.

Politik und Medien sind sich einig: Die Proteste gegen den G20-Gipfel waren das Schlimmste, was Deutschland seit dem Zweiten Weltkrieg passiert ist, wenn nicht sogar schlimmer.

,,Wer unsere Autos attackiert, der attackiert unsere deutschen Grundwerte wie Eigentum, Exportüberschuss und Rundumschutz-Vollkaskoversicherung", schrieb auch das rechts-konservative Meinungsblatt ,,Der Spiegel" empört.

by generic on Tue Jul 11th, 2017 at 03:34:01 PM EST
For another opinion.
Mehrere Kapitalisten aus der Autobranche haben sich ausdrücklich bei jenen Antikapitalisten bedankt, die durch ihre Randale am Rande des G20-Gipfels in Hamburg für erhöhte Verkaufszahlen sorgten. Seit dem Chaos-Wochenende stiegen die Aktien von BMW, VW, Audi, Mercedes und zahlreichen anderen Marken an der Frankfurter Börse um zwei bis sieben Prozent.

"So viele Neuwagen wie zu Anfang dieser Woche verkaufen wir sonst nie", frohlockte Elmar von Falkenstein, der Sprecher des Verbandes der Automobilindustrie. "Das letzte Mal, dass unsere Profite so durch die Decke gegangen sind, war nach Einführung der Abwrackprämie - und für die haben wir haben wir die Politik lange mit Lobbyismus bearbeiten müssen."

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue Jul 11th, 2017 at 03:50:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This is an interesting essay that questions something we've all assumed

New Statesman - David Graeber - The 2017 general election marked the popping of the Blair-Clinton bubble


Voters have, in a thousand subtle ways, been encouraged to look at the world through the eyes of an investor.

What happened in the parliamentary elections last week was the political equivalent of the collapse of a financial bubble.

For two years, practically everyone outside the circle of Jeremy Corbyn's own supporters has been insisting the man was "unelectable". He was an extremist, a well-meaning incompetent, a dogmatic Trotskyist pacifist whose vegetarian beardedness would drive millions of hard-drinking, meat-eating, working class voters into the arms of the Tories.

Corbyn's election to the Labour leadership, we were repeatedly told, would mean the party would be out of power for a generation. Instead, he's caused the biggest swing to Labour since 1945. They've invented football chants about him.

Everyone is now scurrying around to answer the question of how they all got it so wrong, but almost no one is asking about the concept of "unelectability" itself. How did we get to the point where the candidate of a major party was judged not by his political vision, programme or sensibilities, but by an estimation of how different classes of imagined voters were likely to respond to him?



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Jul 14th, 2017 at 03:28:05 PM EST
How did we get to the point where the candidate of a major party was judged not by his political vision, programme or sensibilities, but by an estimation of how different classes of imagined voters were likely to respond to him?

Easy.  Through the application of money "political journalists" (sic) were turned into grubby little propagandists for the 1%.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Fri Jul 14th, 2017 at 05:07:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't normally post from skwawkbox, despite being loyal Corbyn Labour, as it's prone to clickbait stories, but this is reallly just a re-post of a Private Eye story

Skwawkbox - Lab HQ DID deactivate JC team passes on election night - and more

As Private Eye has observed, Labour's HQ - currently occupied by many who are less than friendly to the idea of the party as a genuine, socialist electoral alternative under Jeremy Corbyn in spite of the vast majority of members' full support for it - ended up with egg on their faces on the night of 8 June.

Having fallen for their own propaganda of `electoral meltdown' - being far too removed from the grassroots members, any one of whom would have told them differently - the hapless right-wingers apparently prepared what was effectively a would-be coup, `changing the locks' (or rather, deactivating the entry cards) to prevent Jeremy Corbyn's team from accessing the building.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Jul 14th, 2017 at 06:58:25 PM EST

Details at The Guardian.

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue Jul 18th, 2017 at 11:18:56 AM EST
by generic on Wed Jul 19th, 2017 at 01:15:10 PM EST
In the UK tabloid newspapers have been doing that for years if they think they can get a juicy quote from you.

Remember: they hacked the mobile phone of a teenager who'd been raped, murdered and buried just so's they could detail the mother's anguished calls asking for the child to answer.

They've been total bastards for years, breaking in to your home and screaming at you is nothing, absolutely nothing to them.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jul 19th, 2017 at 04:24:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
EXCLUSIVE: Documents expose how Hollywood promotes war on behalf of the Pentagon, CIA and NSA -
Another one-line quip that was censored by the DOD came in the James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies.

When Bond is about to HALO jump out of a military transport plane they realise he's going to land in Vietnamese waters. In the original script Bond's CIA sidekick jokes `You know what will happen. It will be war, and maybe this time we'll win.'

This line was removed at the request of the DOD.

by generic on Wed Jul 19th, 2017 at 01:36:53 PM EST
yea, but those films require enormous amounts of very expensive goodwill from the military to get made. And, for their money, they want good publicity and only good publicity.

that's just quid pro quo.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jul 19th, 2017 at 04:21:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Guardian - Andrew Postman - My dad predicted Trump in 1985; it's not Orwell, he warned, it's Brave New World

Over the last year, as the presidential campaign grew increasingly bizarre and Donald Trump took us places we had never been before, I saw a spike in media references to Amusing Ourselves to Death, a book written by my late father, Neil Postman, which anticipated back in 1985 so much about what has become of our current public discourse.

At Forbes, one contributor wrote that the book "may help explain the otherwise inexplicable". CNN noted that Trump's allegedly shocking "ascent would not have surprised Postman". At ChristianPost.com, Richard D Land reflected on reading the book three decades ago and feeling "dumbfounded ... by Postman's prophetic insights into what was then America's future and is now too often a painful description of America's present". Last month, a headline at Paste Magazine asked: "Did Neil Postman Predict the Rise of Trump and Fake News?"
Sign up to the Media Briefing: news for the news-makers
Read more

Colleagues and former students of my father, who taught at New York University for more than 40 years and who died in 2003, would now and then email or Facebook message me, after the latest Trumpian theatrics, wondering, "What would Neil think?" or noting glumly, "Your dad nailed it."



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Jul 20th, 2017 at 04:44:41 PM EST


Display:
Go to: [ European Tribune Homepage : Top of page : Top of comments ]

Top Diaries

Civic Self Defense Resources

by gmoke - Sep 19
1 comment

2034

by Frank Schnittger - Sep 10
5 comments

Recent Diaries

Civic Self Defense Resources

by gmoke - Sep 19
1 comment

Faux Accompli

by Cat - Sep 14
11 comments

2034

by Frank Schnittger - Sep 10
5 comments

The Focus Group

by THE Twank - Aug 31
10 comments

Labour grows up?

by Frank Schnittger - Aug 27
57 comments

Exhibit 1

by Cat - Aug 22
22 comments

EU Position Papers

by Cat - Aug 22
24 comments

PACER

by Cat - Aug 18
5 comments

More Diaries...