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Why would the Sudanese stop the killing? They want to kill these people and won't stop until they are done or someone stops them.

And why should anyone stop them? No one cares about black people without natural resources (or is there by any chance oil in Darfur?).

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Fri Nov 17th, 2006 at 10:33:31 AM EST
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Reuters Alertnet: Oil discovery adds new twist to Darfur tragedy (15 Jun 2005)
The existence of big oilfields in Sudan's war-ravaged Darfur region has added a new twist to a bloody, two-year-old conflict, potentially turning the quest for peace into tussle over resources.

Sudan announced in April that its ABCO corporation (which is 37 percent owned by Swiss company Clivenden) had begun drilling for oil in Darfur, where preliminary studies showed there were "abundant" quantities of oil.

The news has prompted some humanitarian experts to wonder whether oil could be guiding Khartoum's actions in Darfur, where a scorched-earth policy against rebels' communities has left tens of thousands dead and forced at least 2 million from their homes.



Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Nov 17th, 2006 at 10:39:56 AM EST
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Oh well, then at least there is a chance to get international intervention. The oil must be produced.

But of course that can also be achieved by letting the current genocide play out. Hopefully the Chinese will buy the oil fields so we'll feel we have to take them for ourselves, and stop the genocide as we happen to be around.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Fri Nov 17th, 2006 at 10:50:50 AM EST
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There already is international intervention. It's called the African Union - though they are heavily understaffed, severely stretched and poorly equipped.

You sound awfully cynical - although I always have troubles conflating cynism with realism.

by Nomad on Fri Nov 17th, 2006 at 11:01:05 AM EST
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Like I said, window dressing. What does the AU matter when they do no difference?

Last time I checked the Janjaweed were still playing "kill the men  and rape the women".

Some interesting, ah, cultural differences.

Turns out that while the Janjaweed Arab militia is raping the women in black villages, these Janjaweed women, sort of backup singers, sing songs making fun of the women getting raped.

Some of the insults in the songs are a little surprising. For example, one song goes, "You are gorillas, you are black, and you are badly dressed." Who would've thought these Sudanese peasants were such fashion snobs? It's not bad enough being raped and killed, but insulting somebody's clothes -- that's a low blow, ladies. Somebody better call the UN about this.

Rather awful, no? And no one does anything.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Fri Nov 17th, 2006 at 12:11:42 PM EST
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Bloody hell.

I'd appreciate it if you'd drop the disparaging tone considering the valiant efforts of the AU. How do you know so certain that the situation would not be worse (as hard as that is to imagine) without them? At least they try - something the western nations have utterly failed to do (again), even support the AU financially.

Sadly, your anecdote is nothing new: "They Sing When They Rape".

by Nomad on Fri Nov 17th, 2006 at 03:46:14 PM EST
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I'm sorry if I made you angry. It's just that the whole Darfur business depress me so very much.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Fri Nov 17th, 2006 at 03:53:22 PM EST
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Not angry, just... piqued.

I haven't reached depressed yet. Darfur still kindles me to white hot rage.

by Nomad on Fri Nov 17th, 2006 at 06:46:35 PM EST
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