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For those who can afford that level of care, perhaps, but I'd like some string evidence that "the overall quality of healthcare in the US" is better than that in the EU.  

The thing is, we can have the best technology and medicine in the world, and we probably do, but if you can't afford it, you are stuck getting vaccines from the back of missionary vans, checkups from 3rd world-esque free clinics, and everything else fom overcrowded ERs.  

I have great insurance, but I was in the hospital last year and it was my insurance company that decided how long I could stay and what services I could get.  Quality of care means little if people are denied access to it.

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire

by p------- on Sun Feb 12th, 2006 at 04:42:29 PM EST
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Quality of care means little if people are denied access to it

Excellent (and terrible) phrase... Maybe we can use it elsewhere?:


High average income means little if people are denied access to it


In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sun Feb 12th, 2006 at 05:06:12 PM EST
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I don't know.  Somehow the "average" in that phrase doesn't make it as catchy.  

You seem to be preoccupied with the idea that if we only knew how inequitably concentrated all that wealth is then ... Well, we'd all wake up to the truth, or something.

But to be frank (no pun intended) Americans don't need a Frenchman to tell them about the concentration of wealth & CEO earnings.  They know it and are simultaneously 1)mad about it and 2)not willing to do anything about it because of some combination of Protestant work ethic, religious faith and national mythology.  Or laziness.  I don't know.  But all the obvious facts and graphs in the world aren't going to help us when over half the country is making decisions based on religious and nationalist ideology and stubbornly held outdated convictions about how the world works.

We won't respond to graphs.  But we are famous for trying to keep up with the Joneses.  So it is incumbent for Europe to continue to prosper and better the lives of its citizens so that if we don't refom out of reason or social justice, we'll do so out of plain envy.

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire

by p------- on Sun Feb 12th, 2006 at 05:27:16 PM EST
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They know it and are simultaneously 1)mad about it and 2)not willing to do anything about it because of some combination of Protestant work ethic, religious faith and national mythology.

This is so very true. I remember hearing a radio report about an initiative to get libertarians to move to New Hampshire in the hopes that if enough moved there they could start the libertarian dream. In the report, they interviewed a woman who had tried a few jobs and was working on her other start-up businesses. None had really succeeded and she was not all that well off. Still, she wanted no income tax and low taxes on everything else. When asked her reasons, she said that when she became a millionaire, she didn't want any of her money going to the government. This to me completely explains how Americans can be angry and not want to do anything about it...even commonsense measures.

It also demonstrates that the individualism that Tocqueville warned us about in 1860 or so is well upon American society. Please do keep up the arguments Jerome, but I agree with poemless. The US didn't listen to an astute Frenchman then, and is unlikely to listen to one now. :)

Enough of getting off topic...

by gradinski chai on Mon Feb 13th, 2006 at 02:18:38 AM EST
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