Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
I do think, however, that the people who need to hear what's being said here the most will never make it behind the gates of this venue. And I believe the front that ESF puts up is a bit too radical to attract the common folk. The people that stream down the old runway into the E and S and F halls have the word "anarchy" written all over them. Dreadlocks, scarves, rainbow belts, holey jeans, long beards, chicken-foot pins, you name it. Surely these people already know about Bush's crimes, about the fact Coca Cola is evil, about recycling, peak oil. I am afraid that those that don't are still outside.

This turning-into-closed-subculture aspect of many events spawned by the altermondialist movement bothers me, too. On the other hand, I thought the ESF is less about spreading the message to the people, but more about creating connections and feedback between activists. The exchanged cell phone numbers of say an Italian trade unionist and a Czech Green might count much more than any talks they listened to.

So, I'd like to ask: have you observed the 'mingling of the people', or do they break up?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri May 5th, 2006 at 02:21:01 PM EST
To me, the mingling among activists is not really obvious. Everyone kind of mingles around here, and it's hard to tell who is who and where people belong. Lots of folks are just sitting around by their booths in the main hall and I'm not sure how supportive they are of other people's agenda. There are a few petitions you can sign, so that's useful, I hope. I imagine people that have similar intentions find each other, but I haven't really seen it happen.

But surely the talks are the most important thing? Networking is definitely a great by-product, but it's the speeches and seminars everything is evolving around.

"If you cannot say what you have to say in twenty minutes, you should go away and write a book about it." Lord Brabazon

by Barbara on Fri May 5th, 2006 at 03:03:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
in my job, we go to conferences mostly for the networking - and once in a while we get the unexpected bonus of an actually interesting presentation.

That's where I find my clients, not where I learn about my business (it can be about learning if you are not familiar with the topic/ the country, but that's never going to be the majority of attendees - or it would be a flop for the others)

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Fri May 5th, 2006 at 04:29:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ohhh, I think we were unsensitive. After all, Barbara is there to interpret these speeches!

But to do away with the implacation that her job would be rendered unimportant, this networking develops around and on the basis of what is talked about. (At least this is how it worked at conferences I was at.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri May 5th, 2006 at 04:46:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I didn't mean that the speeches were uninteresting - just that usually, if you know your business, you shouldn't be learning much. Conferences like this are useful to get a lot of basic information on a topic you don't know, but many conferences do not target that kind of public, and target a much more specialised public, which goes there more for the networking than the content (and who does the speech matters sometimes more thna what s/he talks about).

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sat May 6th, 2006 at 07:44:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Top Diaries

Occasional Series