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That their scheme is, improbably, the only one ever with no downsides doesn't give them pause.

Show me the downside of this:

(Note, just in case: the 'LOL' is addressed at me to mock the fact that I appear to take this bit personally)

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Fri May 25th, 2007 at 05:45:28 AM EST
Dead birds, dead bats, noise pollution, visual pollution. Other environmental side effects. Damaging the profits of the oil companies and threatening the jobs of those who produce fossil fuels. Complication electrical grid design to deal with the more distributed inputs. I could probably go on.

Does the cost-benefit work out positive? Sure. But there are still downsides.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri May 25th, 2007 at 05:50:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Whiner.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri May 25th, 2007 at 06:22:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Dead birds, dead bats, noise pollution, visual pollution.

It's invisible from shore, nobody to hear the noise, no migration paths.


Damaging the profits of the oil companies and threatening the jobs of those who produce fossil fuels.

10 times more jobs per kWh produced than fossil fuel-based generation.


Complication electrical grid design to deal with the more distributed inputs.

Technically solvable problems. More jobs for engineers.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Fri May 25th, 2007 at 06:28:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
10 times more jobs per kWh produced than fossil fuel-based generation.


It's inefficient in labour.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri May 25th, 2007 at 06:33:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Obstinate whiner.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri May 25th, 2007 at 06:43:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
well said...

in a nutshell, do we have the cultural and intellectual curiosity to support a life lived without the dignity of work -as we knew it.

in 2 generations i've seen the shift between one's work being a lifelong choice, with massive implications for one's sense of identity, destiny, andsocial continuity, to a free for all clever-clever slippery-monkey grabfest, to a redimensionising one's balance between work and leisure, and increasingly seeking satisfaction, identity and self-actualisation outside the work place, rather than from inside it.

this inversion can sometimes follow through to the point where what starts as a relaxing hobby, can flower into the main driver for self-expression and even financial success.

that is the greatest adaptation one can achieve and exemplify, i believe.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri May 25th, 2007 at 06:28:51 PM EST
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Inefficient if you discount the renewable part :).
by Laurent GUERBY on Sat May 26th, 2007 at 01:31:59 PM EST
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There is no downside per se.

But the upside is unfairly shared as between the developers/ financiers and Joe Public, making an already unfair split even worse.

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Fri May 25th, 2007 at 06:29:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
to continue on being obstinately earnest and tight in this thread, Joe Public gets most of the benefit of these projects, as they save carbon emissions and pollution. Those not being priced, the developers get little of that 'saving' to them, whereas the public does get a real benefit.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Fri May 25th, 2007 at 07:03:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Obstinately earnest and tight?

Nah...

Bush is a symptom, not the disease.

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri May 25th, 2007 at 07:04:54 AM EST
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My point, as you well know, is that because financing is "deficit-based" far more of the benefits of these projects are enclosed and captured by the generally parasitical City and Wall Street money making machines than should be the case.

There is no reason why 40 to 50% of energy produced by these schemes should not constitute an "energy dividend" to Joe Public.

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Fri May 25th, 2007 at 07:44:21 AM EST
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i'm so chuffed for what you did, jerome.

maudlin sigh....

you could let go and be a bit more immodest...pretend you're italian!

i also think they are fabulously aesthetic, though if they didn't perform as power-generators, less so.

as symbols, they make me want to holler and cheer:

you see, you see! it's not just old oildrums rewelded into savonius rotors in whole-earth workshops, it's mainstream, big bidness..

i loved rg's plan to string them all across the continent, like the first railways across the west usa.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri May 25th, 2007 at 06:16:14 PM EST
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