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My mathematical ignorance shines again! But you are right, with the D'Hondt method 20% will do as there is no way another party will get a higher percentage per seat when given the rest seat.
by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Fri Jun 8th, 2007 at 11:58:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's called the Droop quota apparently. One can, in fact, use the minimum threshold and the Droop quota to seed the d'Hondt method.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jun 8th, 2007 at 12:33:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Interesting stuff. Wouldn't introducing the Droop quota as a seed of the D'Hondt method cause some kind of distortion of proportionality? You are in effect weighing the seats doubly.
by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Fri Jun 8th, 2007 at 01:05:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, if you exceed the Droop quota you're guaranteed a number of seats regardless of the allocation system. So you can
  1. exclude parties not making the threshold
  2. allocate seats by full multiples of the droop quota
  3. apply the d'Hondt method if there are any remaining seats unallocated
Step 2 just takes care of most of the initial steps of the d'Hondt method.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jun 8th, 2007 at 01:08:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The d'Hondt method uses the quotient of dividing the number of votes by the number of seats so far allocated, plus one. There is no double counting as the seats allocated by the droop quota are taken into account when applying the d'Hondt method.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jun 8th, 2007 at 01:13:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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