Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
I think pillarisation referred specifically to religious affiliation, not linguistic identity?
by the stormy present (stormypresent aaaaaaat gmail etc) on Fri Jun 8th, 2007 at 01:34:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I thought in the Netherlands it was religious and in Belgium linguistic, but it's quite confusing.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jun 8th, 2007 at 01:40:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Pillarisation in Belgium had nothing to do with language.
A catholic was a catholic, socialist-socialist..etcetra..

The struggle of man against tyranny is the struggle of memory against forgetting.(Kundera)
by Elco B (elcob at scarlet dot be) on Fri Jun 8th, 2007 at 01:48:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But in addition there were separate French and Dutch Catholic and Socialist parties, right?

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jun 8th, 2007 at 01:49:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There are now, since the federalisation started in the 1970's. Before we had national parties , except for nationalist parties and the greens who only emerged later.

The struggle of man against tyranny is the struggle of memory against forgetting.(Kundera)
by Elco B (elcob at scarlet dot be) on Fri Jun 8th, 2007 at 02:04:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Occasional Series