Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
To make this journey take a trip down an unfamiliar road, I add ,,The Dillinger Escape Plan", which Rolling Stones called the best live band in the universe (they always play only 40 minutes, though).

It's a bit... unusual, you have to hear it loud and... concentrated. I guess you either "get it" or - most likely - you don't.
I opt for their "most hearable" song.



"If you know your enemies and know yourself, you will not be imperiled in a hundred battles." Sun Tzu

by Turambar (sersguenda at hotmail com) on Wed Mar 26th, 2008 at 11:06:11 PM EST
super-concentrated!


Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.
by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Thu Mar 27th, 2008 at 04:49:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
btw, is there a lineage to that singing style (not quite full throat roar but getting there.)  Reminds me of Napalm Death (what I've heard), but I'm sure it must have roots further back.

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.
by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Thu Mar 27th, 2008 at 04:56:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Interesting question. The singing is practically the same for all bands in this genre (called mathcore). Wikipedia lists Post-hardcore, Extreme metal, Crossover-thrash, Progressive metal and Jazz fusion as the stylistic origins, most of which can be traced back further to punk and heavy metal (the two main influences of Napalm death).

The earliest song that is shouted more then sung would probably be "Paranoid" by Black Sabbath (1970):



"If you know your enemies and know yourself, you will not be imperiled in a hundred battles." Sun Tzu

by Turambar (sersguenda at hotmail com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 11:47:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Mathcore--it makes perfect sense!  For some reason when I read that I got a sudden image of Migeru and Jake S throwing themselves against the walls and the hordes in a frenzy of fiendishly complicated rhythms based on even more fiendishly complicated mathematical structures.

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.
by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 03:25:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Occasional Series