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I'm going to suggest that whereas the Planet of the Apes soundtrack was very much subdued by the dialogue (it was the trailer, though), in your two clips--waking up in a huge graveyard! -- the music (wonderful mix of soundtrack and film effects [the bark of the dog]) gives a very particular feel to the images...

which the music does in Planet of the Apes--though I think in Planet of the Apes more was lost by the concentration on the...not the visuals, it was the narrative-over-the-top....

Okay.

Ignore the images in the next piece, just the music--

the theme, the sax, the crescendo....

It says at wikipedia that "The cartoon character created for the opening credits of the movie by Friz Freleng was animated in time to the tune."  Whereas my ears say (maybe erroneously!) that Morricone's theme was written while watching the scene....backwards forwards...

I could be wrong!  It's a way of looking at it....that some put the music to the pictures, while others put the pictures to the music--

an intriguing mix.  In each case to produce a new thing--the pictures with music--where each element is complementary to the other.



Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:49:50 PM EST
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Whereas my ears say (maybe erroneously!) that Morricone's theme was written while watching the scene....

Nope, just the opposite. From what I know, director Sergio Leone often used to play the music for the actors while filming! But there was a back-and-forth included: Leone's films are like compositions themselves, he knew what angles, takes, timings and cuts he wants, and wrote detailed and technical scripts. So, already at the start of a project, Leone and Morricone would sit down with Leone's script and get an idea of what kind of music is needed in which scene.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 08:01:57 AM EST
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As an example of how much Leone could bring acting in synch with Morricone's music, here is a scene from Leone's final masterpiece, the nearly four-hour-long mafia epic Once Upon A Time In America -- this is one scen where I know for certain that the music was played for the actors (it's 09:59 long, with music in the first half and the last fourth):

Also watch this BBC documentary clip, where they talk about and demonstrate the synchronisation from 04:30 in. (But the speaker is wrong to claim Once Upon a Time In The West was the first they filmed this way.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 08:40:03 AM EST
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