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When I was young, I never got Les Dawson--I'd heard the piano playing but it hadn't really registered--he knew what he was doing, he was an accomplished pianist who'd incorporated humour--well, when I first just recently re-listened to this guy following, and I must have seen a Les Dawson clip soon after--because it went-- kerching!

Also known as Melodius Thunk:



Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Sat Apr 12th, 2008 at 08:50:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
(2:58 -- worth watching to the end)

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.
by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Sat Apr 12th, 2008 at 08:52:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Definitely worth watching.

Your comments about Les resonate with my experience. I remember having a conversation with a pianist about 15 years ago, drunkenly discussing musicians, when he came out with the statement that Les Dawson had to be a severely talented pianist, to be able to play things wrong enough to set your nerves on end, but still be recognisable as the tune they were failing to be.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 12th, 2008 at 09:43:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
aka 'the loneliest monk'

well it beats elephant gerald!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Apr 12th, 2008 at 09:38:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
LOL!

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.
by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Sun Apr 13th, 2008 at 05:17:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Monk is in the long tradition of playing a theme and variations. The only difference between his style and that of Baroque composers is that he substitutes harmonic variations whereas they used rhythmic changes (called "divisions" in the Elizabethan period).

Monk also used lots of seconds, ninths and other intervals that were "forbidden" by the rules of classical harmony.

I find it interesting that the biggest development of the past 30 or so years has been a transition to rhythm as the primary musical language rather than melody. In the classical world this began with Terry Reilly, Steve Reich, Glass, etc. In the pop world it has mostly been seen in the rise of rap and its spinoffs which is really a form of rhythmic declamation (like Greek theater).

Modern crossover groups (at least in the NYC area) seem to focus on short phrases which get repeated using changes of rhythm or meter.

I heard a traditional lieder recital yesterday on the radio and I can't imagine the younger generation sitting still for such an abstract form of music these days.


Policies not Politics
---- Daily Landscape

by rdf (robert.feinman@gmail.com) on Sun Apr 13th, 2008 at 01:13:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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