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It's one of those mornings--I didn't finish my theory.  So, whereas the rigorous astringency of a-tonality is considered by some to be "nothing but the essentials", my theory is that, in fact, it is "nothing but the ornaments"--because it refuses to engage with the basic harmonic overtone patterns--so all the bones (that's my theory--that the octave is the basis and then the fifth, through harmonic resonance experiments--e.g. listening to octaves and notes played with the fifth above them) become ornamented with ever more elaborate movements--so for me, if you remove the entire tonal skeleton you are left with ornament and rhythm--I'm thinking of Stravinsky again, how he enjoyed that, seep away the tonal base, bang bang!  Rush, sweep, now play two major thirds against a minor seventh, bang!  In and out and round about...heh...

Anyways, that's the end of my theory!

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Wed May 14th, 2008 at 05:33:38 AM EST
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What are the most famous pieces that do not use (in a weaker or stronger sense) the few most basic intervals?
by das monde on Wed May 14th, 2008 at 05:46:40 AM EST
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The Rite of Spring is the most famous piece that comes to mind (I keep mentioning that piece)--check out any clips of it, see how long you can hear basic intervals before you hear other basic intervals playing in sync and with no preference one against the other--well, that's my first example.

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.
by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Wed May 14th, 2008 at 05:59:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Here you go, right from the start--using all kinds of intervals (7:46).



Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Wed May 14th, 2008 at 12:59:23 PM EST
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In Copland's Appalachian Spring the doppio movimento based on the Shaker hymn 'Simple Gifts' starts with the oboe and bassoon in 9ths - an interval normally avoided.  Play it on the piano and it sounds like crap.  In the concert hall ... it works.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Sat May 17th, 2008 at 12:12:04 PM EST
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