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Before looking at the interface shouldn't we be looking at how we want to structure the database?

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri May 16th, 2008 at 04:41:41 AM EST
No, the interface is rather the point of this. The rest must follow.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri May 16th, 2008 at 04:43:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And the database is also the hardest part - if we want it to perform efficiently, be upgradeable in the future, and also if we have to migrate data from the current database.  This is where real money and expertise would be money well spent.

"It's a mystery to me - the game commences, For the usual fee - plus expenses, Confidential information - it's in my diary..."
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Fri May 16th, 2008 at 06:44:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Eh? No it's not. The interface is much harder. The database is pretty well known and worn technology, once you know what you want it to do.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri May 16th, 2008 at 07:00:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We don't need money to buy that expertise.

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri May 16th, 2008 at 07:06:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
First rule of corporate programming : have a nice interface to show to the boss as quickly as possible.

Which is what is happening here...

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères

by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Fri May 16th, 2008 at 07:22:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, there are the two questions of "What do we want the 'product' to do?", and "How do we make it do that?". The first does not define the second. Choices still have to be made on which infrastructure to use, etc. I imagine that the number of people with an opinion on number two are many fewer than on number one. I also think it is the less interesting question.

"What it does" will come to define the sort of community the site can support, "How it does it" should not matter. The user should not be able to feel the nuts and bolts of a properly designed 'product'. Thus, "what it does" comes first.

by someone (s0me1smail(a)gmail(d)com) on Fri May 16th, 2008 at 07:30:37 AM EST
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Indeed, in this case it is a perfectly appropriate way of doing thing. (Not so much the case in a corporate environment where the boss wants an interface to be able to say, "that button should go there" and moving his weight around).

The only thing that frightens me a bit is the necessary size of the community required to support that functioning ; it'd seem to need a thousand rather than a hundred participants. I hope either that I'm wrong or that ET will grow very quickly upon the introduction of multi-lingualism.

If someone has access to the ET database and copious amounts of free time : how many people have commented within the last month ?

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères

by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Fri May 16th, 2008 at 07:36:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think the advantage is that with the machine translated versions always available it is possible to run the site primarily in English until some other languages begin to take-off. As I see it, there is no good way to start the thing immediately in many languages at once. I.e. the active community will not be available at first for most languages. Maybe with some pushing some of the better diaries into translations the process could be initiated? The ramp-up to have a larger portion of non-english speaking users might be slow. But without any infrastructure at all, it cannot happen.
by someone (s0me1smail(a)gmail(d)com) on Fri May 16th, 2008 at 08:00:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, I'll agree.

There'll need to be some "promotion" in the various language blogging communities too, similar to the one made on DKos

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères

by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Fri May 16th, 2008 at 08:05:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I would probably start writing longer comments and diaries in swedish, machine-translate and then edit the english version to perfection. That would give most content produced by me in good swedish and reasonably good english, and machine-translations for other languages. If the machine-translations from swedish to english is good enough (or at least learns from corrections made, so that I do not have to correct the same errors over and over) time consumption/comment could stay roughly similar as I write faster in swedish.

Assuming similar behaviour among others whos first language is something other then english, we would soon get it good enough in some languages to attract members who are today excluded by the usage of english language. My guess would be that spanish and french will be among the first to attract users who will primarily use their first language.

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by A swedish kind of death on Mon May 19th, 2008 at 08:37:14 PM EST
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