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Ah!  Then I offer you the following Vangelis piece, I didn't put it in the diary because the connection was: hypnotism, an italian group called Hypnosis, who did a piece that was then re-worked by Vangelis.  This is the piece--the moments of special pleasure for me come one after the other.  It's all a fantasy in space with a Vangelis soundtrack, but at 3:50 there's a--for me--evocative shot of the astronaut on a foreign planet in his or her spacesuit, with just the subtlest of blue glows around the head casing--that blue strip where we live, carried to farthest space--and then, immediately afterwards (3:58) the ship taking off, the huge brown smog-cloud as it accelerates up and away from the planet, the sheer power described by that wall of exhaust!  And the final scenes, with the speaking clock...



Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Thu May 29th, 2008 at 07:04:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
An inspiring clip.  Great interweaving of visuals and music.  How many times has artistic intuition and insight pointed us where we should go long before it was rationally possible?

Today I read in Science News of evidence that a supermassive black hole  has been ejected from a galaxy at a velocity of 2,500 km/sec., possibly by an even more supermassive black hole in a merger of galaxies. This apparently had been possibility predicted by Einstein's Theory of General Relativity.  What I know about general relativity is that it is stated as a set of partial differential equations that are WAY beyond my mathematical ability, which had trouble with plain old differential equations.  I also know from reading that solutions are often found at limits or boundary conditions where some elements drop out, simplifying the equation.

Non-the-less 20 yrs ago when I was considering attempting a SF story I postulated a "black hole drive" consisting of two microscopic, confined black holes which were manipulated in such a way as to cause gravitrons to radiate in one direction and anti-gravitrons in the other, thus producing acceleration. Alas, how to do this never came to me, so I am still here This idea certainly did not fall out of any deductive process, but was entirely based on intuition,  perhaps the greatly delayed result of psychedelic consumption in the late 60s-early 70s.  So I was taken by the observation that black holes could repel each other and produce acceleration.  Thus your clip really sent me on a non-psychedelic trip.

Thanks.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri May 30th, 2008 at 12:35:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I postulated a "black hole drive" consisting of two microscopic, confined black holes which were manipulated in such a way as to cause gravitrons to radiate in one direction and anti-gravitrons in the other, thus producing acceleration.

No! No! No! That cannot work in the real world! This is folly!

It is well known that there is only one truly safe way to go around the universe : the Bistromathic Drive, a greatly improved version of its predecessor, the Infinite Improbability Drive, with much fewer occurrences of fruitcakes and sperm whales.

by Francois in Paris on Fri May 30th, 2008 at 12:56:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I do love Adams. And Vonnegut. The wife has found the concept of the Ganfaloon useful in explaining her metaphysics.  My biggest concern about the black hole drive was explaining why they didn't merge and pull the whole space ship in also on a singularly bad day.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri May 30th, 2008 at 01:04:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
My biggest fear in posting this is not that it is wrong, but that it might be right, and the MIBs will come for me ---to give me my icepick lobotomy. :-)

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri May 30th, 2008 at 01:07:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Didier Marouani's "Space Opera" was popular in East Europe in the 80s. Is it well known still? Here is "Part 1", 4:39

by das monde on Fri May 30th, 2008 at 05:46:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I didn't know it. (Neither now nor - I think :-) - in the eighties.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri May 30th, 2008 at 02:57:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, yes! All together now, calmly, forward...

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.
by metavision on Sun Jun 1st, 2008 at 03:40:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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