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A great finish!

One kind of stop, when the entire music grinds to a halt and then all instruments "break out again" in the same instant, has been a very "commercial" aspect of rock music in the early part of this decade [BTW how do you call it in English? The Zeroes?]. I believe the trend was kicked off by Garbage's 1998 single I think I'm Paranoid, but nanne can correct me.

Garbage: I think I'm Paranoid (03:40, the famous stop is at 02:26):



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Jun 6th, 2008 at 04:56:14 AM EST
Er, the title, I meant Pauses...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Jun 6th, 2008 at 04:59:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Listening to the Garbage track, I remembered Butch Vig was the drummer--Nirvana, I wondered if they'd done any stop-starts, but on a re-listen they did more soft-LOUD as the break.  Then I thought PJ Harvey (getting Butch Vig confused with Steve Albini!)....but I was thinking, hmmm, that Garbage sound...for me comes from the early nineties--ah, The Breeders!  Cannonball, from The Last Splash (1993).  This is the track I remember full of stops and starts.  In particular at 00:19, 00:25, (sort of another as everyone but the drummer stops at 00:37), 00:57....(whole song is 3:33)

Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RiJMZQXa2o

....thinking of Polly Harvey got me thinking to Patti Smith--did she use any important pauses?  I'm not sure, but this next is worth hearing because it has a memorable intro (start) (and because I like the song! ;) (3:10):

Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0brHGJ6xqbk

Okay, a last piece, Polly Harvey, I'm going to suggest the first 11 seconds (on an embedding disabled version  it lasts 32 seconds) are a long pause--you can hear a crackle, so the track has started; when will the instruments or her voice enter the soundspace?  Great pause at 00:32 to introduce her voice, the song builds, up with the volume, then down (soft LOUD soft), then a build again, then a drop, and a sudden stop on the guitar at 3:02, bass stop at 3:08, voice stop at 3:24.

Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8ZE6XK89YA

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Fri Jun 6th, 2008 at 05:42:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, The Breeders! Definitely a connection in sound, though Garbage's musical roots are in grunge and My Bloody Valntine.

I missed The Breeders when it was new. Maybe because it was a time I thought "alternative" stands for "wants to differ from the mainstream but doesn't have the foggiest idea what to do instead", based mainly on the attitude and music of some Budapest student acts; though I believe part of it is that my hearing developed since...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Jun 6th, 2008 at 10:53:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
DoDo!  I offer you....(8:09)



Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Fri Jun 6th, 2008 at 07:43:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, the change to another theme at 1:51, considering the build up....Excellent!

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.
by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Fri Jun 6th, 2008 at 07:53:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Speaking of changeovers, a parting shot:

Joaquín Rodrigo: Concierto de Aranjuez, 2nd movement (10:01):

The piece has constant changeovers between orchestra and acoustic guitar, but the peak is the lead-up to and the abrupt changeover at 07:50. (Despite ample choice, hard to find a good interpretation on YouTube, BTW)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Mon Jun 9th, 2008 at 05:20:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In a longer multi-part piece, stops and starts can follow upon each other, and be connected. Thus in symphonies. Here is one I like, the transition from movement 2 to movement 3 in Antonín Dvořák's New World Symphony. Regrettably, I found no continuous version on YouTube (what's more movement 2 is cut in half), so here are the two movements separately:

2nd Movement part 2 (07:45)

3rd Movement (07:55)

(I like the latter more than the more famous 4th movement, BTW)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Jun 6th, 2008 at 05:54:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There are transitions on rock albums, too. A quite obvious one is from track 4 to track 5 on Midnight Oil's Diesel And Dust album: the end of Arctic World and the start of Warakurna. I found a concert version of the latter where they start with the end of Arctic World:

Midnight Oil: Warakurna Live in Sydney (04:51, the 'stolen end' of the other song is 00:12-00:28):

(For comparison, the studio versions: Arctic World [only album art still] Warakurna [only music!]; if only YouTube could play back-on-back.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Jun 6th, 2008 at 06:15:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"Transitions" would make another great diary theme!

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.
by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Fri Jun 6th, 2008 at 06:50:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Something I hate is when songs end with a fade-out (if I use the word correctly: the song goes on but the volume is slowly reduced to zero): for me that means the composer just had no idea how to finish. Now, a lullaby would lend itself ideally for a fade-out. But John Lennon knows better (and he had the good sense to get Ringo Starr to sing it) -- here is Good Night from the White Album (03:10) [apparently with takes from the movie Baraka]:



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Jun 6th, 2008 at 06:31:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Fade out is the right term.  Radiohead, "Fade...out...again...")

In the Beatles song (I hadn't heard it before), the voice fades out to a whisper (like you said, a lullaby), while the music has a definite last string chord...

That idea of the voice fading out ties (in my head!0 into the idea that as you drop from hynagogic into slow wave there's a point where the external inputs are shut off, an actual moment, but the conscious mind doesn't notice because its faded out from external inputs as the internal stimuli come louder.

And I've ordered the film to watch--I really enjoyed the images, the film got a panning from a critic and high praise from two viewers, so we'll see!

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Fri Jun 6th, 2008 at 06:49:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Fade out is the right term

I'm still not sure we mean the same thing. What I meant is that the song goes on repeating itself like before, but the sound editor slowly turns down the volume. Say, like any Madonna song from the eighties, or this classic from Cindy Lauper:

the voice fades out to a whisper

I would say: the voice gets lighter, ends, and then there is a whisper.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Jun 6th, 2008 at 11:07:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What I meant is that the song goes on repeating itself like before, but the sound editor slowly turns down the volume.

That's what I mean.

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Fri Jun 6th, 2008 at 07:34:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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