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Spain v ETA
Please elaborate.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Dec 28th, 2009 at 05:31:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Government of Spain has been involved in a long-running campaign against the separatist and terrorist organization ETA ("Basque Homeland and Freedom"), founded in 1959 in opposition to Franco and dedicated to promoting Basque independence through violent means. They consider themselves a guerrilla organization while they are listed as a terrorist organization by both the European Union and the United States on their respective watchlists. The current nationalist-led Basque Autonomous government does not endorse ETA's nationalist violence, which has caused over 800 deaths in the past 40 years. wikipedia

It has to be noted that almost in any Spanish jail there is a group of ETA prisoners, as the number of ETA prisoners makes it difficult to disperse them.

Under Article 509 suspected terrorists are subject to being held "incommunicado" for up to thirteen days, during which they have no contact with the outside world other than through the court appointed lawyer, including informing their family of their arrest, consultation with private lawyers or examination by a physician other than the coroners. In comparison the habeas corpus term for other suspects is three days.

In January 2009, ETA threatened that engineers, senior technicians and executives of companies involved in the construction of the high-speed train line would be targets for assassination as well.

Sounds like fun.

Align culture with our nature. Ot else!

by ormondotvos (ormond.otvosnospamgmialcon) on Wed Dec 30th, 2009 at 04:29:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And this is supposed to be the end of civilisation or something?

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 30th, 2009 at 05:34:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]

(source: Spanish Ministry of the Interior, linked from wikipedia)

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 30th, 2009 at 06:13:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
La izquierda radical fía su supervivencia a que ETA asuma la propuesta de Alsasua. El CorreoThe [Basque Nationalist] radical left depends for its survival on ETA accepting the Alsasua proposal - El Correo
Un sector de sus bases baraja distanciarse de la banda si prosigue con la actividad violentaA sector of their base is considering distancing itself from the gang (sic) is it continues its violent activity.
......
La izquierda radical es consciente de que su supervivencia política depende del éxito o el fracaso de la conocida como iniciativa de Alsasua. Alejada de las instituciones después de sucesivas ilegalizaciones, sus dirigentes reconocen que la situación es complicada y que la presión policial y judicial, incluida la resolución del Tribunal de Derechos Humanos de Estrasburgo que ratificó la proscripción de Batasuna, les ha hecho «mucho daño». Los problemas organizativos, la falta de movilización y los cambios en la sociedad, azuzados por una fuerte contestación ante el fracaso de los dos últimos procesos de paz, les han empujado a la búsqueda de un «cambio de ciclo». Más aún si se tiene en cuenta el avance de Aralar en los últimos comicios. The radical left is aware that its political survival depends on the success or failure of the so-called Alsasua initiative. Excluded from [political] institutions after successive illegalizations, its leaders admit that the situation is complicated and that police and judicial pressure, including the resolution by the Human Rights Court in Strasbourg which ratified the outlawing of Batasuna, has 'hurt a lot'. Organizational problems, lack of [popular] mobilization and changes in society, spurred by the failure of the last two peace processes, has pushed [radical leaders] to the search for a 'change of cycle'. Even more taking into account the advance of [independentist, anti-ETA political party] Aralar in the latest elections.


En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 30th, 2009 at 06:28:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
they are listed as a terrorist organization by both the European Union and the United States on their respective watchlists.

Those lists are compiled by legislative or executive bodies and not subject to judicial review. As such, they are statements of political preference rather than statements of fact.

Any given organisation on the lists may or may not be a terrorist outfit (and ETA probably is, along with what's left of the IRA). But its presence on the lists does not in and of itself tell you anything about it. Except that it has attracted the ire of the US State Department.

(For those keeping score of such matters, the Basques are overwhelmingly Catholic, when they are religiously affiliated at all.)

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Thu Dec 31st, 2009 at 01:16:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This is actualy very good.

The War Nerd: Basques My Ass! (The Exile, March 11 2004)

The ETA is a good example of what I call "boutique terrorism." It's the kind of war where the rebels kill a few carefully-picked people a year, usually local government officials or cops, just to remind the locals that they're still around and get a little free publicity for their "cause." The Corsican separatists are the same kind of pitiful wimps, and the IRA isn't much better. In about 30 years of "war" against the English, the IRA killed about 1,300 people. That's 40-odd people per year. Less than a three-day weekend kill total for Los Angeles. The only reason these Irish wimps have such a big bad rep is that the British hype them so much, just because don't want to admit they had so much trouble with a neighborhood possie of illiterate drunks.

These aren't armies -- they're little ethnic gangs, like Crips for white guys with a grudge and a lot of free time on their hands. Even the Spanish police, who do their best to hype the ETA the same way the British do the IRA, admit that there are only a few dozen guys active in the ETA.

In this kind of war, the rebels go way out of their way to see that they only hit the right people. Spain is a rich Western country, with lots of videocameras wandering around. The last thing the ETA wants is to lose the propaganda war by shredding a bunch of civilians. They'd rather do nothing than deal with bad publicity like that. So they spend months and months setting up some poor Spanish Guardia Civil cop or pro-Spanish Basque politician, then hit him when they're sure nobody else will get hurt. They mess up sometimes -- these aren't the brightest guys in the world -- but the whole notion they'd set off a dozen no-warning bombs in the Madrid train system was just totally ridiculous.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 1st, 2010 at 07:35:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, I don't think the illiterate jab is on target: I'm pretty sure at least some of the IRA had read their Hegel and Marx, for example.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Jan 1st, 2010 at 07:39:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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