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The Italians used to do that regularly at Brennero, but it seems to happen less frequently these days. Maybe the police are the only people who think the train no longer stops at Brennero, as the timetable for this year indicates. But they didn't just get a lot of engines that can run on both AC and DC. No, they still stop for 15 minutes to change the engine, just as before, and the schedule change seems to only mean that you must have an international ticket for the journey. "Seems" because in practice nothing seems to have changed even there,
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Thu Apr 9th, 2009 at 06:08:29 AM EST
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But they didn't just get a lot of engines that can run on both AC and DC. No, they still stop for 15 minutes to change the engine

There are two DC/AC types. ÖBB class 1822 from the nineties was more or less a technical failure (lots of breakdowns, not enough power); the through train ambition was given up after a few years. The new ÖBB class 1216 (also "Taurus 3") would in theory be perfect, but Italian authorities have drawn out the certification process for higher speeds on DC lines. (Italy is introducing a new train control and signalling system.) Simple technical issues might be the reason, but blind protectionism, too.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Apr 9th, 2009 at 07:19:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
...I should add that there are a couple of other AC/DC locos using the Brenner route, but all of these are active in freight service. One special case is the FS E.412, whih in theory would be suited for 200 km/h traffic, but the whole class was given to Trenitalia Cargo. One of the idiocies of splitting up former state railways into passenger, express and freight divisions...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Apr 9th, 2009 at 07:36:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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