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Not quite - as I also believe you can change your mind of reality from inside out, by working with your own map of reality. :-)
by Fran on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 02:10:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One example was Gandhi, who changed his myth from the inside out and then changed the narrative for the larger environment.
by Fran on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 02:12:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
He did not change his myth - the myth changed him.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 02:14:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thats not how I understood what he wrote - he went through a process of looking at himself and the world around him and that changed his myth. Because after it was not the same myth as he had before.
by Fran on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 02:16:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm going to get myself into hot water here, but.....

There are Ghandis - and Hitlers - everywhere. Sometimes the wandering strange attractor of mythology locates itself on top of one of these leaders-in-waiting and transforms them. And thus the mythology renews itself. This renewal process has been happening since the dawn of humanity.

The reason I think individual  'will' is not involved, is because any mythological set is contributed to by all its believers, not just one. That leader has to be wanted, needed, desired and created by all those believers - even if it is change that is the aim, rather than a specific leader. The individual will is ridiculously weak in comparison.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 02:36:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I would say it is not so much a question of will as know how to change the myth. But I do not say it is easy and I guess it does require some will, but it is not the primary incredience for change.
by Fran on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 02:41:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Great take.. but there is still some creation..some ability to generate the rigth story,at the right time... its like a theory in physics.. that's the metaphore I would use. You need the experiemtns, you need the frame in the heads of your fellow scientists but you also need creativity and stroy-telling... and the idea of making the experiments, of course.

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 02:46:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
kcurie also talks about the grammar of the myth - for me it has the following ingredients:

  • Language
  • Memories
  • Decisions
  • Beliefs
  • Values
  • Attitudes
  • Ways of sorting information
  • Strategies

Each of them can be influenced and changed.
by Fran on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 02:47:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I woudl say mostly right.. but some structural myths are not verbal. they need some kind of language but not really verbal-conscisou language per se. They need symbolic language of course but not verbal or conscious language.

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 02:54:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, I agree but language is also symbolistic not only verbal.

Memories are usually symbolistic (visual) and kinesthetic and can have aspects of verbal language.

by Fran on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 02:57:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One of the big structural myths involves maintenance of self esteem.  It involves experienced basic human emotions, what we have internalized from our culture of origin and how we relate to society at large and more.  People will and do go to great lengths to feel good about themselves.  My guess would be that a problem in this area is usually a component for one who seeks help from a professional.  

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:21:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
People will go to great lengths to believe positive things about themselves. That's not quite the same as feeling inherently positive.

One of the biggest problems with Enlightenment mythology is that positive feelings rely on external states and external events.

People have tried to create inherently positive mythologies - a Christian called Matthew Fox tried to promote something he called original blessing, as an antidote to the concept of original sin - but they're rarely sticky.

In fact one of the many ironies of the Enlightenment is that structural mythologies are terror-based, and rooted in the immiment fear of pain, death and annihilation.

Aside from a brief outburst of optimism in the 60s, which created Star Trek and some other positive ideologies, most Western mythology is surprisingly gloomy and desperate. ('In the long run we're all dead.')

There's a permanent opposition between a slightly strained cult of personal sovereignty, and Everything Else, which is either indifferent or hostile.

The Enlightenment never really outgrew Christianity's fear of apocalypse. And aside from fear of snakes, mythologies of doom and apocalypse have always been one of the paradoxically unconscious drivers of Enlightenment values.

Unsurprisingly, it's not easy to feel inherently positive in that kind of background atmosphere.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:47:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One day, we will meet.
I had never realized the star-trek, 60's optimism connection... it is self-evident now....

I formally attach to it :)

And regarding Enlightenment fight with Apocalypse  mythologies.. wow... wow...now  you will have me at least week thinking about it.

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 05:01:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I used to think of Star Trek as silly space opera. But you're not the only person close to me who sees it as a desirable utopia.

Did I say Space Opera?

In Scientology, founder L. Ron Hubbard used the science fiction term space opera to describe what he said were actual extraterrestrial civilizations and alien interventions in past lives. Upon Hubbard's death in 1986, the Church of Scientology announced that he had discarded his physical body and was now "on a planet a galaxy away."


En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 05:08:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not "the new generation series" which uses the 60's optimism and merges it with the ecological nascient movement... a must-see.

You mightlike thsi as an introduction http://www.pointofinquiry.org/susan_sackett_the_secular_humanism_of_star_trek/

but write star trek the new generation and humanism in google..and you will see.

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 05:11:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In fact one of the many ironies of the Enlightenment is that structural mythologies are terror-based, and rooted in the immiment fear of pain, death and annihilation.

Surely you mean that these terror based mythologies are what the Enlightenment inherited.  They went to great lengths to discredit the Christian narrative and largely succeeded among the educated elites.  And for the Day of Judgement they substituted "The Judgment of Posterity."  The whole Enlightenment Project consisted of replacing concepts of divine guidance with concepts of human direction and values.

More than anything they overestimated the power of reason.  The Jacobins thought they could replace Christianity with a Cult of Reason, but that only lasted so long as the Terror endured. The Enlightenment was never more than a veneer over a much more tumultuous, emotional and religious society.  So long as educated elites ran things, Enlightenment values endured.  But with the broadening of the voter franchise and the incorporation of the merely literate, as opposed to the broadly educated, into the political process the Christian world view increasingly intruded upon and then challenged Enlightenment values.

Reason cannot compete with the power of the mythic frame of Christianity in the minds of those who have never really been able to see the power of reason, which is so often found in subtlety.  In a very real sense the founders of the Enlightenment, especially in France, never had the opportunity, especially in the ancien regime, to see just how weak the appeal of reason was.  Adam Smith was closer to the mark in seeing that the requirements of commerce could produce a more refined population, but even there, that refinement did not extend to causing the masses to prefer reason to religion.

Our modern world was built by elites with Enlightenment values and the process was conceived as The Enlightenment Process.  But, in the USA, in order for some of those elites to retain power and to continue their own self-aggrandizement, they formed an alliance with a numerically superior group who fundamentally rejected the entire Enlightenment Project and values.  Having sown the wind we all are now reaping the whirlwind.

Fortunately, the fundamentalist true believers are not, by themselves, a true governing majority, and, in the USA, those to whom they supplied critical support, when elected to government, have discredited themselves in the eyes of a majority--for now.  But they may form a blocking minority.  Time will tell and the game is still afoot.  One thing is clear.  Those who still hold Enlightenment values, such as the universal rights of man and the rights of minorities, need to learn how to frame and narrate their agenda in terms more appealing than those used by their opponents.  The current US Administration has not distinguished themselves in this regard.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 11:03:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I really really think that you should diary this...

It is brilliant.

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Fri Aug 28th, 2009 at 06:03:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
How human beings come to think in new narratives is a wonderful topic. As much as how people attach to some frame or some narrative.

I have more or less an idea about how people attach and dettach, accpet and reject frames...about how each one constructs his own personal narrative but there are only partial rules. Each person is a different world engaged inthsoe rules. And I deeply believe that the process is chaotic and deterministic with not that much random noise (I have no proof wahtsoever but I will bet that most physicist agree with me, when we are explained cahotic system with noise we all come to the same conclusion.. this is how I came to be). We do have some indication coming from the excellent predictions socioologists and antrhopologists do predicting human behaviour in a lot of circumstances at short-term scales

But regarding how human beigns develop personal and different narratives, some of them as powerfull as gandhi, well it is a biological and cultural aptitude, like maths. You develop them by training, and the more you train the more you develop teh aptittue.. and may be you may need some brain structure working very well (thanks to some biological properties.. ei maybe encoding genes and proteins may have a small role in it by a cascade effect). It might involve reflexion, stroy-telling and other brain enhanced activities (self-inspection and so on), who really knows je jej certianly I do not know. Add probably it can not be known scientifically... I guess  the answer must go to the wonderful magic box for now :)

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 02:44:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
kcurie:
the process is chaotic and deterministic

this can be, but does not have to be and I am talking of over twenty years of experience working with clients and helping them to change their map of reality, in way that is more fulfilling and open, then their previous one. Sometimes it can be very easy and fast and at times it can be slow and take some effort. But it is always amazing and gratifying what can happen to someone when they are able to shift their map of reality.

by Fran on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 02:55:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think this does not contradict my point. Interactions are detereministic, but the trajectory is cahotic precisely because meeting someone , or a owrd, at the proper time, or somehting minimal can have huge change.

So the trajectories change completely...So in a snese, working with people is one of the multiple things that maek the system chaortic.. but I would say that you try to use techniques that have been proven to be effective in your everyday life. So in this sense you want them to be deterministic.. to ahve effect.. the problem is that you can not know the exact effect because the system is chaotic...

And I did not even talked about random noise (like bumping into someone).

So I agree with you, but also with Migeru, do not misunderstimate the influence of the narratives we explain to ourselves constantly.... if someone is not in the frame/history/map to cahnge, he/she will not change, no matter what.

A pleasur

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:53:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, I agree with you - all I wanted to say is the structural myth can be changed, and I agree you can not always determine the exact way the myth will change in the process, but that was not my point. Now if we want to change it, either consciously or unconsciously, is another question.
by Fran on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 05:01:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I mostly agree with you, a lot of very relevant structural myths can be changed...

but somehow I think some are too powerful and too integrated in oneself.

Maybe through strong meditation and learning I could stop feeling obvious that "myself" exist...at most I couls try to understand and take the buddhism philosophy.. but frankly how on earth I am going to think that a tree is thinking in my brain? I think I should have learnt that when I was child... now it is no longer possible.

the same goes for the misterous spatial mythologies.. I am not sure you can change them because, frankly, the only thing I know is that they are very powerful but I do not even understand them even at the basic level.

I am with you there is a lot of fundamental structures that one can change in adulthood.. but I am not sure all of them can be changed.

Still, I am an optimistic kind of guy.. one can change the relevant ones..but this is a stroy a tell to myself :)

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 05:08:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I agree with you that meditation would be one way to become aware of the deeper myths - if you can become the observer you can learn to observe the stories you tell yourself.

And I did not say it was always easy. :-)

by Fran on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 05:13:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
you can learn to observe the stories you tell yourself

But you don't need meditation for that. You can just read a lot of Anthropology.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 05:16:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I disagree - it is not the same reading the myths in books and observing them in yourself. From my experience intellect alone is not enough for change, though it can be useful.
by Fran on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 05:18:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I disagree with you.. for some people reading is more vital than observing a "myself" deeply intoxicated with Monty Python ideas as soem of us here.

Both are useful to different people.

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 05:20:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Or you could be observing by performing a test.

Implicit Association Test

It is well known that people don't always 'speak their minds', and it is suspected that people don't always 'know their minds'. Understanding such divergences is important to scientific psychology.

This web site presents a method that demonstrates the conscious-unconscious divergences much more convincingly than has been possible with previous methods. This new method is called the Implicit Association Test, or IAT for short.

In addition, this site contains various related information. The value of this information may be greatest if you try at least one test first...

This one showed me a lot of the beliefs I held at the time.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Fri Aug 28th, 2009 at 09:01:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
kcurie:
deeply intoxicated with Monty Python ideas

???

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Aug 30th, 2009 at 08:35:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Different ways.... je jeje

Now Migeru can start with meditation and Fran with anthropology.. deal?

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 05:18:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
you should become a mediator! :-)
by Fran on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 05:20:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
My favourite off-time work... well at least my friends always say I am trying to mediate... You know the stuff, put yourself in the other shoes..look at this this in this other way, "what about those goodpeople there who see it different than you", this doe snto necessarily mena that XXX, it cudl mean that XXXX..

Well you know... the stuff.. but somehow I think it should be "artesania" not a full-time organized job :)

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 05:28:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was talking about you when I said 'reading Anthropology'.

I don't pretend to have the level of narrative self-awareness of yours or Fran's...

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 05:34:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This discussion touches on individual transformative experiences and potentials.  Ghandi, IMO, transcended the mythic frames of his origin and education and served as a guide to many of his followers in so doing for themselves.  In this manner he influenced M.L.King and Nelson Mandela and thereby the whole world, even though his transformed frame has yet to become widely normative.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 02:46:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I coudl nto agree more.

there is indeed a creative aspect. You need to know a lot of stuff.. and it might come naturally.

The more you trainethe more easy it seems to develop and project transformative experiences.

I think you would probably write a better diary than myself regarding how people attach and dettach of narratives, how they create some, how they read (semi-accept) some, how they rreject most and how personality and the internal and external bahvioural world develops.

Transformative experiences, awakenings (also named revelations) and strong cognitive dissonances are the main ingredient of personal psychology (or anthropology at the individual level).

As you indicate both creation and attachment are strongly related... a very impressive mythology  if it spreads must create one of the above-mentioned three. Agreed

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 02:52:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But none of us choose or control our own history, even if we happen to produce more serotonin in response to certain stimulii - for genetic reasons.

The point at which 'willpower' (whatever that is - but I suspect it is a Learned Behaviour Disorder) is exercised, is preceded by a chaotic personal history. 'Willpower' has to be seen in that context. It is not something plucked out of thin air or applied by a secret switch.

One can change one's life, but only if that life is ready to be changed - like the psychologists lightbulb.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:10:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, but that's a particular form of willpower used in some therapeutic context.

I think some people refer to willpower when they talk about the human ability to realize that something was different that he expected and act accordingly.

Maybe others have different definitions of willpower.

But willpower in the sense you use it is a very particular word used in some particular context in western treatments of the self (which we all know is our main characteristic, to develop hundred of concepts and ideas about the self).

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:17:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But you can control or change your response to your history.

Changing ones life includes changing the narrativ or even the myth - but I do agree, you have to be ready. For most people it is a dissatisfaction with their current lifes that makes them look for change. But it is not solely a thing of willpower or thinking - that does not work, it has to go deeper into what kcurie calles the symbolic.

by Fran on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:23:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It is easy to misunderestimate the importance of the stories we tell ourselves, individually and collectively.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:41:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I am not sure what you mean by misunderestimate the importance.... - the stories are part of how we define and see ourselves - so they are important.
by Fran on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:56:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the stories are part of how we define and see ourselves

That is a story you tell yourself. :-)

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:58:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Did I tell you you make a lovely couple?
:)

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:59:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A lovely couple of times?

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:59:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
LOL, yep!
by Fran on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 05:04:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Fran
For most people it is a dissatisfaction with their current lifes that makes them look for change. But it is not solely a thing of willpower or thinking - that does not work, it has to go deeper into what kcurie calles the symbolic.

This is almost always true.  The power of the frame and the myth is such that the only reliable motivation for one to change that frame and myth is that it does not work and instead produces psychic pain. Such a person feels adrift and lost and usually is missing several understandings, experiences and insights.  I have been that person.

The mystics can be a guide here, but only if one is at the proper point in their life.  When I was in grad school I took a Western Intellectual History course taught by, my luck, a self professed Thomist, his belief system was far from the only thing this professor liked to be outrageous about.  One of the assignments was Juan de la Cruz's Dark Night of the Soul!  I was a 21 year old atheist and thought that having to read and attempt to understand this drivel work was my own dark night of the soul. I read the work and tried to understand it but I had no basis for so doing. I got my A by not having to deal with Juan.  A few years later, after some relevant personal experience, no problem!  I clearly understood what Juan had been talking about, even though the way out that I found would have been alien to him. (Unless, perhaps, some of Juan's experiences were triggered by ergot, but even then...)

One thing though is clear: utter and abject misery is a wonderful motivator to cause one to consider that perhaps there are errors or omissions in one's understanding of one's self and the world, although it is far from sufficient. Subsequently I have often seen that a similar situation is the motivating force for others to reevaluate themselves and their lives.  One can arrive at a similar conclusion on a purely abstract and intellectual basis, but the understanding thus achieved usually lacks the emotional force and motivating power to cause them to be willing to undertake the difficult inner work needed for change.

 

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 10:02:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
My wrap up diary on the round-the-world trip will touch primarily on this subject.

On a completely related note, I hope to get some face time with Guru Fran in Paris.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Aug 28th, 2009 at 02:37:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Looking forward to it and I would love to meet you.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Aug 28th, 2009 at 05:35:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I am looking forward to your diary and also to meeting you in Paris. :-)
by Fran on Mon Aug 31st, 2009 at 10:02:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
ARGeezer:
One thing though is clear: utter and abject misery is a wonderful motivator to cause one to consider that perhaps there are errors or omissions in one's understanding of one's self and the world, although it is far from sufficient.

This also works for countries.

And perhaps for civilisations (but not quite so much.)

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Aug 28th, 2009 at 05:16:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But not always well, as Germany in the '30s demonstrated.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Aug 28th, 2009 at 05:36:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But none of us choose or control our own history

What was Marx's quip about 'making history, but not just as we wish'?

We certainly do not choose the circumstances into which we are born.  Worse, the development of our brains is guided for years by our parents, who are, after all, only doing the best they can. But at a certain point we can become aware of these factors and then we have the ability to choose how we react and respond to that situation.  Therein lies our own opportunity and responsibility.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:48:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think you would probably write a better diary than myself regarding how people attach and dettach of narratives, how they create some, how they read (semi-accept) some, how they rreject most and how personality and the internal and external bahvioural world develops.

I would not want to try to improve on what you have accomplished here.  Had I attempted this diary it would likely have gone in directions that would have produced a chorus of "OH NOES!"

But I strongly agree that a mythology that is strongly integrative of all aspects of our psyches, that enables us to see and understand the constraints under which we labor and to visualize how our world could better be organized and that enables people to feel that they are doing vital and necessary work to provide a better future that might include ponies for all could become viral and overwhelm weaker frames.  Christianity did this some 1700 years ago, but, IMO, did so by winning the promising and lying contest with other religions.  How about a mythology wherein it is not necessary to die to reach heaven?

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:37:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ARGeezer:
How about a mythology wherein it is not necessary to die to reach heaven?

now you're talking!

'heaven is in your mind' (winwood/capaldi)

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Aug 30th, 2009 at 08:40:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That is not very different from any philosopher claiming to have had a key insight after introspection (or study of the external world, or both) and developed a new philosophical system.

But not everybody is a philosopher.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:06:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I agree, but one does not have to be a philosopher to change your myth. I assume the philosophers are the ones we hear about or read from - but there are more people out there who have been able to change their narrativ.
by Fran on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:19:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think you tend to hear from people who change their structural narrative because it results in such a fundamental change to the self and so it is perceived by them as an event worthy of being communicated to others.

Think of all the born-again Christians who can't stop trying to save others by convincing them to accept Jesus Christ as their personal saviour.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:22:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Some, but I know quite a few who have no desire to try to convince others to of their new structural narrativ.

And not everyone who changes their narrative become a born again Christian. :-)

by Fran on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:25:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And not everyone who changes their narrative become a born again Christian. :-)

That's not what I said, I said that everyone who is a born-again Christian has changed their narrative.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:28:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sorry, my heavy-handed way of teasing you.
by Fran on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:29:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Tsk, tsk.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:30:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You make a lovely couple... :)

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:36:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And not everyone who changes their narrative become a born again Christian. :-)

Thankfully.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 04:40:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Fran:
not everyone who changes their narrative become a born again Christian
Here's a conceptual metaphor for you: "falling off the horse on the way to Damascus".

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Aug 28th, 2009 at 04:34:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
not everybody is a philosopher.

yet!

everybody lives by some kind of philosophy, consciously or not.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Aug 30th, 2009 at 08:41:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
maybe that's a definition of 'mythic', that the change goes both ways...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 03:03:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I agree with everybody's comments here and see no real opposition in any of it. Everything (and every act) is a cause and an effect.

paul spencer
by paul spencer (spencerinthegorge AT yahoo DOT com) on Thu Aug 27th, 2009 at 08:06:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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