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In the super master of the science meeting of European Neuroscience I tried to make the point that alcoholism is a Learned Behavior Disorder.. obviously I could not make the point to the great masters.. but I could do that with the students.. to get an idea what the masters of Neuroscience think...

Unfortunately, they just do not get it... rat receives alcohol, rat does this and that, I give the rat that and then he does that... no way to point them that the social behavior of rats is slightly different than humans. Fortunately, there seems to be that much money into it, that eventually something can come make which can be useful regarding the physical drive..or not. As far as it goes I guess alcoholics will have to unlearn the behavior the standard way.. with a majority of people visiting people who do no have any idea of anthropology and rarely gets what "Learned behavior" means.. with a little bit of luck they can try someone smart who can help.

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Fri Dec 31st, 2010 at 05:33:25 PM EST
All about Long Term Potentiation and the neurology, psychology (writ large,) and the neurology + psychology.

The last, for me, is the most misunderstood.  Using the standard analogy, to get a computer to "do" something the requirements are usually given as:

  1.  hardware

  2.  software

  3.  running the program on the hardware

But that's only true in the grossest sense.

The hardware comprises more than physical objects, e.g., microcode.  The software depends on programming language, compilers, & etc. as well as the exact hardware environment since part of that is user defined, e.g., which port the printer is hooked up to.  Once the program is running how it affects the system depends on how the user uses the program, e.g. computer viruses.    

And, of course, to make things even more fun the hardware is constantly changing in and from subtle to  gross ways.  The software ditto, the hardware plus software ditto, and the current running program can self-modify.

Wheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Sun Jan 2nd, 2011 at 12:26:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In a sense the hardware, software analogy is only true at the extremes, that is, basic brain architecture is hardware, and basic structural mythology is software.. but the living reality, as you say, is the messy middle when everything modifies everything.

I am happy enough if they would recall a little the basic sociological aspects of the pshychology-effect in the pattern of learning which modifies the physical driving. Not that most of the people there understand any of it.. most of them fear a computer if it does not use Exce or the statistics universal program (not named here to avoid a publicity stunt).

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Sun Jan 2nd, 2011 at 03:39:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In a sense the hardware, software analogy is only true at the extremes, that is, basic brain architecture is hardware, and basic structural mythology is software..

I'm not sure what you mean by "structural mythology."  Could you please point me to a definition?

Sapolsky at Stanford seems to get "the basic sociological aspects of the psychology-effect in the pattern of learning which modifies the physical driving."  He's been studying the Forest Troop and has come-up with some interesting findings.

...but the living reality, as you say, is the messy middle when everything modifies everything.

This reminds me of the John Nash response when someone asked him, after his paranoid schizophrenia was overcome, why a man who had accomplished so much intellectually got to a point where he thought "there was an organization chasing him, in which all men wore red ties."  [From the link]  His response was, "That idea came to me in the same way as my previous ideas."

Heh.  Indeed they do.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Sun Jan 2nd, 2011 at 04:33:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Reading Sapolski with delight....

Regarding structural mythologies, most antrhopologists just call them myths we live by.. but I do not like to use the word myth in non-scientific enviros given the wrong connotation it has.

A more proper name are structural narratives... I did a diary once.. oh my God I found it.. and it was more than a year ago...

http://www.eurotrib.com/story/2009/8/27/103113/865

there are no links in the diary.. but any symbolic anthropology textbook is full of examples.

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Sun Jan 2nd, 2011 at 07:29:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
thanks for the link


She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Mon Jan 3rd, 2011 at 11:58:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
kcurie:
most antrhopologists just call them myths we live by.. but I do not like to use the word myth in non-scientific enviros given the wrong connotation it has
Take a cue from George Lakoff and call them Metaphors We Live By.

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jan 3rd, 2011 at 12:18:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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