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I don't question the 'usual case' you outline, but this case violates it right from the opening description: the police did not 'pick up some lefties'. Instead, two women on their own went to a police station with allegations of improper conduct (neither thought they rose to the level of rape) that the police exaggerated, apparently, and then brought to the 'weekend substitute prosecutor'.

By the way, it's not confirmed, but most news sources indicate that at least one and maybe both of the women are widely known individuals, not Mata Haris, who have worked for several years or more in Sweden at sort of leftist/alternative jobs, or for those sorts of organizations.

fairleft

by fairleft (fairleftatyahoodotcom) on Tue Aug 24th, 2010 at 11:19:07 PM EST
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The police certainly didn't pick up and interview Assange, which might have been a reasonable first step if the case had any credibility. Apparently the prosecutor's office didn't even try to contact him, which is surely bizarre in the circumstances.

Was he detained/charged at all?

As for 'widely known sort of leftists' - sources?

Interestingly:

CORRECT: Swedish Prosecutor To Look Into Assange Case This Week - WSJ.com

Under Swedish law, molestation is defined broadly and can refer to anything from groping someone to inappropriate, non-sexual behavior, for example, disrupting public order.

As I understand it Swedish law has an extremely broad definition of rape which includes almost any non-consensual or inappropriate activity. So if the rape case has been dropped, I'd suggest that makes a conviction for molestation somewhat unlikely.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Aug 25th, 2010 at 12:22:46 AM EST
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That the prosecutor didn't contact Assange for a statement is neither bizarre nor unusual under Scandinavian jurisprudence. Taking statements isn't the prosecutor's job, it's the police's job. What is bizarre (but unfortunately not unusual) is that the prosecutor didn't tell the police to do their job properly and in full before they bothered him.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Wed Aug 25th, 2010 at 02:14:46 AM EST
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No - it is bizarre not to tell the accused about an arrest warrant when the rationale for the warrant is to prevent the accused from fleeing the country.

In this case the press found out about the warrant immediately but Assange didn't - which certainly seems bizarre to me.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Aug 25th, 2010 at 06:58:08 AM EST
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According to the person who seems to be most aware of how they operate, Jake S, it is pretty much standard procedure for the apparently right-wing police to release 'damaging to leftists' info to the press immediately, presumably before they've notified the leftist. This notion that something 'bizarre' is going on is without evidence at this point. Just standard right-wing-assholes-worldwide police and prosecutors.

fairleft
by fairleft (fairleftatyahoodotcom) on Wed Aug 25th, 2010 at 11:44:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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