Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
It's more of a 'hearing' or interview that takes place in the process of evidence collecting. After a suspect has been charged (and legally represented), further interviews might then be called interrogation.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Aug 25th, 2010 at 11:55:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sweden operates under Scandinavian Civil Law ... about which I know nothing.  

Apparently, then, the prosecutor has an active role during the investigation?

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Wed Aug 25th, 2010 at 10:14:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm not sure about the role of a Swedish prosecutor. But the info is in here somewhere.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Aug 26th, 2010 at 02:51:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes. If for no other reason then because the prosecutor has to show up in court and present the police's case for why they want to continue to detain the suspect(s) beyond N hours (with N being 6 in Sweden to 24 in Denmark). I gather that Swedish prosecutors also function as the formal head of investigations, but I'm unclear as to the details.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Thu Aug 26th, 2010 at 06:55:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm not sure, but I think N is 72 hours in Finland - depending on the seriousness of the potential charge measured by the maximum length of potential imprisonment.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Aug 26th, 2010 at 01:18:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Occasional Series