Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
I suspect it may simply be a case of sleeper trains not playing very nice with the much larger cargo market - goods being the main thing moved on the rails at night. If so, a dedicated-to-passengers hsr network would likely have much better economics for longdistance sleeper service than the current rail net.
by Thomas on Tue Jul 19th, 2011 at 06:36:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sleeper trains aren't that fast and run when few passenger trains run and freight trains themselves are less frequent on conventional lines, too. No, sleeper trains aren't a capacity problem. Today in Europe, the economics of sleeper trains on high-speed lines would probably be coloured by the differential in track access charges.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue Jul 19th, 2011 at 07:14:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It seems to me that the number of running sleeper trains is quite smaller than in the 1990s or even 1980s, and the rail cargo volumes are probably lower as well. So capacity should not be a factor.

What about Eastern Europe? No chance for any upgrades, or even stopping the rot?

by das monde on Tue Jul 19th, 2011 at 11:35:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Occasional Series