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A report worth reading: High-Speed Rail in the U.S. - Potential and Impact on CO2 Emissions
From these variants we have created a "Worst HSR savings case". With the high CO2 intensity of electricity production, high HSR electricity intensity, and low occupancy, CO2 intensity of HSR travel is over 50 gCO2/pass-km, while in the reverse case it is only 7.5 gCO2/pass-km, vs 38 gCO2/pass-km in the projections. The worst case cuts CO2 savings by 20% in the Baseline case and 37% in the Global case, while the "best" HSR leads to about 30% more savings in either case. [...]

For those concerned about CO2 emissions, an outcome where both HSR and other modes have low intensities while shifting to HSR is the highest is the best (this is the case we illustrated in detail in Table 10). What saves the most CO2 overall in the US, however, may not reflect the maximum savings that can be tied to HSR, because the CO2 intensities of the modes shifting to HSR will also have fallen. Projections of CO2 from HSR that assume a low- CO2 profile of HSR because of technological progress in trainsets and electric power production should consider that for consistency similar progress would occur to reduce emissions from light duty vehicles and air travel.

I don't think there will be great emission reductions in air travel but that's a whole different area.

I remember there was a report specifically about the CO2/energy efficiency of California HSR that Clem Tiller or someone else corrected on a blog. Caltrain-hsr?, cahsrblog? - shit, I don't remember and I can't find the post anymore. Can anybody help me?

Schengen is toast!

by epochepoque on Tue Jul 19th, 2011 at 10:29:52 PM EST
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