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Why is this sort of gesture so attractive to politicians?

No one, I presume, is compelling the French state not to follow the proposed new rules without the need for them to be written into the constitution. Could it be that the politicians would not want to be blamed for expenditure cuts, so they do not want any discretion not to make them?

by Gary J on Fri Sep 9th, 2011 at 08:11:55 PM EST
Gary J:
Why is this sort of gesture so attractive to politicians?

Duh, this is the belief du jour: the ideology you must profess to appear as one of the Serious PeopleTM. It positions Sarkozy right next to Merkel, away from the profligate tax-and-spend Socialists.

Expressing the faith is enough by the way: Sarkozy has never followed that rule himself and, even if written into the Constitution, it has plenty of loopholes to allow wiggle room. And Sarkozy isn't the kind of guy who'll let a rule decide what he can or cannot do.

No, the main, if only, interest of the rule for Sarkozy is as a weapon to attack the Socialist and run for re-election next year; that's all. "Irresponsible" is the prevailing adjective lobbed at the Socialists: irresponsible for refusing this "common sense rule", irresponsible for opposing the teachers job cuts and calling for 50000 new teachers hiring in the next 5 years (François Hollande yesterday), ... The trend is well established by now.

by Bernard on Sat Sep 10th, 2011 at 04:34:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I suppose if a majority of the voting public falls for the "responsible" "common sense" nature of these policies we will have the civilizational collapse we deserve.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Sep 10th, 2011 at 05:02:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Indeed; but so far, if the polls are any indication, the public is not buying it.
by Bernard on Sat Sep 10th, 2011 at 05:13:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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