Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
I could write a lot about it, being involved and all. But since we are talking abuot local elections, it is not really that interesting.

How involved and "why not really that interesting"? "All politics is local."

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Sep 14th, 2011 at 10:26:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A minor election campaign (mayor) and a nominal candidate (council).

Yes, all politics are local. But in say, Goslar they imported a mayor from Bavaria, member of the CSU, who defaeted a SDP/Grüne/FDP candidate handily. That is nice story, but it don't really tells us much about the general political mood in Germany.

by IM on Wed Sep 14th, 2011 at 10:34:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Cities are the Research and Development laboratories of the future.  Only cities have the population, infra-structure, and wealth - as well as the tolerance - to support the Creative Class (here and here) from which new solutions will arise.

Which puts DoDo's post a couple of days ago Berlin's Gentrification Row: Locals Rage Against Rising Rents:

Berlin's Kreuzberg and Neukölln districts were once known for cheap rents and diversity. But their edgy urban charm has attracted both affluent residents and international investors, jacking up rents in the process. Now long-time locals are fighting to keep their flats.

Above the gritty caverns and stale air of the Hermannplatz subway station, thousands of Berliners came together last Saturday in the city's Neukölln district in a gesture of solidarity. Middle-aged parents pushed baby strollers alongside leather-clad adolescents with colorful hair, protesting what they all see as the systematic displacement of the city's lower (and even middle) class residents.

critically (IMO) important.  It is these neighborhoods that are the attractors of and for the Creative Class meaning they are the potential incubators of 'What's Next.'  Destroying these neighborhoods eliminates the  social wealth of networks, contacts, meeting places, small businesses, etc. where, eventually, the CC, over time, creates the vibrancy underpinning for economic development.  

Regional and State authorities are spending millions to artificially create a Silicon Valley¹ while the city government of Berlin is busily destroying one!  

This doesn't make a whole lot of sense, putting it mildly.  

The only way to stop this nonsense is for people to get active in local politics and change things around.

Thus, the upcoming Berlin city election is important.

¹  Which emerged spontaneously by the exact process I described in the above paragraph

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Wed Sep 14th, 2011 at 11:43:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, yes, But I am living in a depopulating town. And in the whole of Lower Saxony there are about two cities,Hanover and Brunswick. I don't really think Salzgitter or Goslar or Oldenburg or even Wolfsburg is a laboratory of the future.
by IM on Wed Sep 14th, 2011 at 12:03:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well ... they could be.  

A quick look at the list of towns you gave allows me to suggest Oldenburg looks like a possibility.  The Carl von Ossietzky University, according to Wikipedia "specializes in cross-disciplinary studies" with a 18,000, or so, student body both of which are Good Things.  The town has a population of ~160,000 meaning there is enough people to support "off-beat, odd ball" ventures.  Close to Bremen so ventures based in Oldenburg can use some of its infrastructure, e.g., the airport, as well as having the potential to attract customers from Bremen, or expand into the city 'on the cheap,' and could also be a source of financing for business expansion.  (?) The plaza in front of the Oldenburg castle could be used as an inexpensive venue for a town market - if it isn't already used as such - for local businesses, offering a wide range of products (and services?) to bring-in people from Bremen.  The port can be leveraged in a couple of different ways as well.

The necessary condition for this is an Oldenburg city government that doesn't have its head up its bum.  

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Wed Sep 14th, 2011 at 12:43:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Financialization eats creative classes for breakfast. I suspect that is what is driving the destruction of the Kreuzberg and Neukölln districts. But the process is either facilitated or impeded by city governments. The cities like development fees, building fees, etc., but it might be nice if they gave some consideration to the long term impact of what they are permitting. But that flies in the fact of dogma that says "markets know best" and that economics is an autonomous sphere upon which evil government must not encroach.  The Kreuzberg and Neukölln districts of Berlin need candidates that will point all of this out, oppose the development and expose the real agendas (I suppose to be) at work.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Sep 14th, 2011 at 01:45:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Financialization eats creative classes for breakfast.


She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Wed Sep 14th, 2011 at 02:38:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Occasional Series