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Elections are still on the way. Final date will be decided today. Tentative date: September 12.

Principally, it would've been possible for Rutte to start looking for a new working coalition. But giving the lengthy mess it took in 2010 to form a working coalition and the resounding failure to cooperate with Wilders, are some  reasons to hand that decision to the people.

Left unsaid in the diary that over the past 1.5 years several political 'coalitions of the willing' had emerged that kept the government going. For European affairs, Rutte's cabinet could never rely on Wilders, but still found support in opposition parties, particularly Labour often plugged the gap. For the extension of, say, military missions in Afghanistan, the cabinet relied on the same political alliance that now hammered out the new austerity plans.

The bigger left parties - SP and Labour - have already announced they don't see the need for jumping through the austerity hoops in times of economic recession. I'd guess this will become part of their political campaigning. In this regard, they will be joined by the biting anti-EU rhetoric of Wilders.

The larger left-orientated parties - SP, Labour, Greens - have not formed a majority for decades, and this still applies today. Also note that the Greens, moving more and more to the economic right, have signed up for austerity measures.  

by Nomad on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 at 04:36:47 AM EST
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Greens continue to confuse monetary austerity with environmental conservation.

guaranteed to evoke a violent reaction from police is to challenge their right to "define the situation." --- David Graeber citing Marc Cooper
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 at 04:42:30 AM EST
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Confuse and confuse... if they want people to inhabit caves in a preindustrial society, austerity is the right policy.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Sun Apr 29th, 2012 at 02:37:47 PM EST
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The larger left-orientated parties - SP, Labour, Greens - have not formed a majority for decades

Political incompatibility? Where are the red lines which prevent coalition? Are they still inviolable in the current situation?

On paper, it looks as if the left, fragmented as it is, ought to get a majority. Does this leave us staring at a (disastrous) centre-left/centre-right coalition, in the German style?

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 at 04:49:58 AM EST
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No, Dutch society is in principle very bourgeois, left wing parties have only been able to form a majority government by ruling together with the centrist christian parties, either protestant or roman-catholic.

Furthermore the socialist party portray themselves as the true left wing party, the greens are confusing liberalism in society with liberalism in economic policy and Labour is somewhere in between. Also the greenleft party usually derides the socialists and Labour as old-fashioned and like now does not want to co"operate with them, because they themselves are the only true progressive (tm) party.

Or to exaggerate a little, the greens are the student city dwellers, labour the old poor people on the country side, although only in certain parts of the country admittedly, and the socialists the new working poor.

And yes, german politics is kinda like dutch politics.

by Wilfred on Tue May 1st, 2012 at 07:36:55 AM EST
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A depressingly familiar picture.

Last Thursday I attended an event with the Danish greens, where it was explained to them, using small words, that the left needs to have an industrial policy if we are to have a prayer of countering right-wing populism.

Based on the Q&A session afterwards, I would be pleasantly surprised if a third of those present understood anything of what was said. Based on the discussion in the audience following the Q&A session, I would be pleasantly surprised if half of those who understood what the talk said did not know it when they arrived.

Lots and lots of nice people and good will there. But no economic analysis worth the paper it's written on.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Tue May 1st, 2012 at 01:53:10 PM EST
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Lots and lots of nice people and good will there. But no economic analysis worth the paper it's written on.

Been there, done that. You are a true hero Jake for actually trying to educate people. It's more than I usually have the energy for. Keep up the good work!

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Wed May 9th, 2012 at 07:56:48 AM EST
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.
See map for geographic presentation of Election Results 2012. Labour party (PvdA) is well represented in all large cities: Amsterdam, The Hague, Rotterdam, Dordrecht, Utrecht and even in Maastricht. In the rural area, the two northern provinces Friesland and Groningen are very strong Labour (in the past Communist).

"But I will not let myself be reduced to silence."

'Sapere aude'

by Oui (Oui) on Tue May 1st, 2012 at 05:50:28 PM EST
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Wilfred:

Or to exaggerate a little, the greens are the student city dwellers, labour the old poor people on the country side, although only in certain parts of the country admittedly, and the socialists the new working poor.

Often, I find a description of the groups involved has more predicative power on what a party will do then an analysis of the stated ideology.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Wed May 2nd, 2012 at 02:22:26 AM EST
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