Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:

Today, not only do all these things exist, but, in combination, they've taken us from connected to hyperconnected. Now, notes Craig Mundie, one of Microsoft's top technologists, not just elites, but virtually everyone everywhere has, or will have soon, access to a hand-held computer/cellphone, which can be activated by voice or touch, connected via the cloud to infinite applications and storage, so they can work, invent, entertain, collaborate and learn for less money than ever before. Alas, though, every boss now also has cheaper, easier, faster access to more above-average software, automation, robotics, cheap labor and cheap genius than ever before. That means the old average is over. Everyone who wants a job now must demonstrate how they can add value better than the new alternatives.

Our dear Moustache is so enamored that he predicted such connectivity nearly a decade ago (in the preceeding paragraph to the one copied here), though he ignores those writing about the phenomena three and even more decades ago. Did he forget a key part of this hyperconnectivity?

the demand for electricity will grow as devices and data proliferate, and the production of electricity comes from rotating hardware of major scale. It will be quite some months before 3D printers can make high quality, 20 yr life 3 MW wind turbines. /snark

Plus, there's a whole lot of movement of physical things like food and water and people. And buildings have to be built.

So his Randian call for people to innovate (there's a difference between real innovation and Randian innovation) leaves out the entire dynamic of the physical world. Perhaps he should reread his gushing discovery of Yurpeen two speed toilets.

But then, he's The Moustache of Understanding, and you're not.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Sun Feb 17th, 2013 at 04:25:10 PM EST

Others have rated this comment as follows:

Display:

Occasional Series