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Coming from America, the idea that beer would ever be serve in any way other than supercold seemed odd.  Now, it did seem strange to me when I saw the Thai putting ice in their beer, but I could understand the thinking behind it.  But warm beer?  Incomprehensible.  I remember hearing several jokes about Brits and their warm beer.  But of course it's not just beer that should be ice cold, but everything, even water - or so I thought.

In my years living in Japan, though, Ive changed.  It started with water.  I mainly drink water straight from the tap, and just got used to drinking it at whatever temp it came out.  It was too much work to cool it down.  Now I prefer it that way.

Then it was wine.  People say that white should be chilled, but with my small fridge, and my buy and eat on same day shopping habits, chilling wine properly was too much work.  Now I'm used to it, and find that when its chilled, its too hard to really taste, especially with the fruity and sweeter wines from South America that I usually drink.

Just recently I have come to appreciate barely cooled and lukewarm beer.  I first noticed it with Belgian ales, that they really tasted completely different when cold, vs cool.  Now I'll leave beers out, and drink them at room temperature.

by Zwackus on Fri May 24th, 2013 at 09:29:43 PM EST
Hooray, chilling a beer suppresses the flavour. That is probably a good thing if it's a mass produced chemical sludge, you wouldn't want to taste it anyway; but for a good beer, serving it cold just misses out all the best bit part.

Plus, beer retains maximum carbonation at about 13 degrees C, so the colder it's served, the flatter it is

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat May 25th, 2013 at 05:08:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Most wines shouldn't be colder than a cold room temperature anyway.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 06:14:30 PM EST
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Tell that to the Americans I know, who refuse to drink white unless it's been chilled in an ice bucket for half an hour.
by Zwackus on Thu May 30th, 2013 at 07:48:26 AM EST
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Well, sure, but they're, you know, wrong?

Over-chilling kills wines. And beer with any flavour to it too, which just makes it join the fizzy iced-drinks category (triple but unsubtle sensation, fizz-chill-sweet ie sodas, fizz-chill-bitter ie lagers).

There was craft beer on tap at our local organic fair last Sunday. The brewer malts his own home-grown barley and has planted hops so he will soon have his own. The result is carefully made and pretty good. He has what I'd call a brown ale, that is really decent stuff out of the bottle. But fizzed-up and over-chilled out of the keg, it was just bland.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu May 30th, 2013 at 08:08:14 AM EST
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<shrug> Americans. What can you do?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu May 30th, 2013 at 10:03:25 AM EST
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So what do you say about Air France serving chilled red wine (this happened to me).
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Thu May 30th, 2013 at 12:15:44 PM EST
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They're out to please American customers?
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu May 30th, 2013 at 12:55:42 PM EST
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On a flight to Montreal?
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Thu May 30th, 2013 at 01:12:30 PM EST
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Transatlantic...
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu May 30th, 2013 at 03:05:24 PM EST
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Maybe this is me coming from a binge booze culture, but taste is not the only reason alcoholic beverages are drunk. There is also the alcohol, for the purpose of you know getting drunk. And then taste is just in the way.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se
by A swedish kind of death on Sun Jun 2nd, 2013 at 06:55:44 AM EST
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Some people actually manage to fool themselves that taste is what they're doing it for.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Jun 2nd, 2013 at 10:30:05 AM EST
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I regard getting drunk as a pleasant occupational hazard. However, if getting drunk is the sole intent, then you don't need to buy beer. Just get a bottle of cheap vodka and neck it. Plastered in under half an hour.

But why? What's the point?

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Jun 2nd, 2013 at 10:37:52 AM EST
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Vodka has greater risk of overshooting and passing out or spending the rest of the night puking.

Also, in Denmark at least, the vodka that gets you drunk cheaper than beer tastes like they dried it with benzene. Even diluting it 5:1 in cola will not overpower the aftertaste.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Sun Jun 2nd, 2013 at 01:25:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But if you just want to get drunk, who cares ?

If you want to enjoy the process, then we're back on my turf

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Jun 2nd, 2013 at 03:03:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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