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This seems to me to require a reduction in German dominance, an increase in the powers (and Europe wide accountability) of EU institutions

But the uncomfortable truth is that Germany wouldn't have any dominance in any of the institutions on its own, and the austerity dogmatism of the past five years wouldn't have been possible if even just a minority of other European governments would have made a real stand against it. (And don't just think of votes and vetoes in bodies, also think of bringing out certain ideas into "pubic" (that is MMS that is VSP) discourse.) Instead, most other EU governments and the Commission went along in one way or another: Finland's and the Netherlands's governments as fellow Eurozone hawks, the UK's and Sweden's and Visegrád countries' as fellow hawks on the sidelines, France's and Spain's ad at times Italy's as "model students". Methinks we need to throw out austerian governments in several countries and win the next EP elections before considering possible institutional changes.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Feb 12th, 2015 at 11:39:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Case in point:

Stubb: No more patience with Greece | Europe | DW.DE | 12.02.2015

Prime Minister Stubb, Finland has until now helped with the financial rehabilitation of Greece. How much patience do you have left with the Greeks?

Alexander Stubb: At this point, we have very little patience to spare. Finland has provided a loan of a billion euros ($1.4 billion). Bear in mind that our entire state budget is only 53 billion euros. So we are not talking about trifles here. We think that Greece should definitely keep to its contracts and obligations. That is what European integration is about. If one country were to break with its obligations, it would be unfair to those who have paid. And it would also be unfair to countries that already had to undergo difficult adjustment programs, such as Ireland, Portugal and Spain. We expect the Greeks to do their bit.

The compromise is very simple. They could receive an extension of the current bailout program, which in our opinion would be in Greece's best interests. But then they would have to push on with their structural reforms. The body monitoring these structural reforms is the International Monetary Fund (IMF). The IMF has 70 years of experience with situations like this. I don't think we should allow any scope for populism in Europe. We have obligations and contracts, and we must stick by them.

Oh yeah, the IMF's 70 years of experience in monitoring structural reforms ruining countries...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Feb 12th, 2015 at 12:47:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
O don't blame him. Some evil gewmrna forced him to say that.
by IM on Thu Feb 12th, 2015 at 05:09:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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