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Flüchtlinge: Die zwei Realitäten Europas | ZEIT ONLINE

Auch ganz normale Menschen - nicht nur die, die man gemeinhin "Gutmenschen" nennt -, sind jetzt plötzlich stolz darauf, dass sich ihre Gesellschaft von seiner besten Seite zeigt.

,,Gutmensch" is a term right wingers use in order to ridicule humanitarian efforts as naive and short-sighted.
Gutmensch - Wikipedia

Im Januar 2012 erhielt das Wort bei der Wahl zum Unwort des Jahres 2011 in Deutschland den zweiten Platz. Die Jury kritisierte die aus ihrer Sicht 2011 einflussreich gewordene Funktion des Wortes als ,,Kampfbegriff gegen Andersdenkende".[2] Mit dem Wort werde ,,insbesondere in Internet-Foren das ethische Ideal des ,guten Menschen` in hämischer Weise aufgegriffen, um Andersdenkende pauschal und ohne Ansehung ihrer Argumente zu diffamieren und als naiv abzuqualifizieren".

Kampfbegriff is the next expression that I have some difficulty in translating, though.

by Katrin on Fri Sep 4th, 2015 at 08:54:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Why don't we start calling anyone who says "Gutmensch" a "Schlechtmensch" or a "Bösemensch"?

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Sep 4th, 2015 at 09:09:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Good idea. I usually say "Demagoge", but probably the target audience doesn't understand that.
by Katrin on Fri Sep 4th, 2015 at 09:22:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In English we can do a one-up on Bush the Lesser's "evildoers" and call them "do-evilers" or "do-no-gooders".

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Sep 4th, 2015 at 09:31:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Migeru:
Why don't we start calling anyone who says "Gutmensch" a "Schlechtmensch" or a "Bösemensch"?

They would play the victimisation card that they're used to playing.

"Of course I'm bad, according to the tenets of the dominant world view that rejects me as heterodox, and considers the orthodox as good."

In France, nasty right-wingers call Gutmenschen "les bien-pensants".

I used to be afew. I'm still not many.

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Fri Sep 4th, 2015 at 11:00:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In Italy they're called 'buonisti', do-gooders.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Sep 4th, 2015 at 09:15:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
droit-de-l'hommistes (copyright Sarkozy?)
by Xavier in Paris on Thu Sep 10th, 2015 at 09:04:03 AM EST
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I always say Schlechtroboter. Better a gutmemsch then a bad robot.
by IM on Tue Sep 8th, 2015 at 06:22:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Kampfbegriff, a battle cry? reminds me that the word "slogan" came into English from Scots Gaelic, where it originally meant... "battle cry".

I used to be afew. I'm still not many.
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Fri Sep 4th, 2015 at 10:43:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But in German, the connotation is that you also fight the attacked by re-defining him with the word.

(Another example, from Hungarian: Jobbik speaks of "intruders" instead of illegal immigrants or refugees.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Sep 4th, 2015 at 10:58:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Exactly, the word is a weapon in the battle, not only a battle cry.
by Katrin on Fri Sep 4th, 2015 at 01:50:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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