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For my own sake I put up these links as I'm no legal expert .... and I'm not sure Frank or a blogger has already published this information. ET is in need of a library on BrExit. :)

EC: Brexit overview and timeline

11 January 2019
Council decision on the signing of the withdrawal agreement

The Council (Article 50) adopted a decision on the signing of the withdrawal agreement. It also approved a draft decision on the conclusion of the withdrawal agreement and decided to forward that draft decision to the European Parliament for its consent.

    [...]
    One or more Member States may request that the Commission representative be accompanied, as part of the Union delegation, by a representative of that or those Member States in a meeting of the Joint Committee or of a specialised committee in case particular matters to be addressed at that meeting are of a specific interest to that or those Member
    States. In particular, Ireland, the Republic of Cyprus and the Kingdom of Spain, respectively, may request that the Commission representative be accompanied by:
    (a)
    a representative of Ireland, in the meetings of the Committee on issues related to the implementation of the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland where those issues are specific to Ireland/Northern Ireland;
    (b)
    a representative of the Republic of Cyprus, in the meetings of the Committee on issues related to the implementation of the Protocol relating to the Sovereign Base Areas in Cyprus;
    (c)
    a representative of the Kingdom of Spain, in the meetings of the Committee on issues related to the implementation of the Protocol on Gibraltar.

Brexit: what has to happen in UK and EU parliaments to ratify withdrawal and future trade agreements

The future relationship

However, the situation on the EU side is constitutionally more complex than with the divorce part of the Brexit process. In addition to the EU parliament, which must consent to the future trade agreement, all 27 member states will need to ratify it according to their national constitutional provisions.

This is because the future trade agreement between the UK and the EU would be a mixed agreement, dealing with some matters for which the EU is responsible and with some matters which fall into what's called "shared competence" between the member states and the EU. For example, the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) ruled in 2017 that provisions relating to investor-state dispute settlement procedures and non-direct foreign investments fall into areas of shared competence.



Global Warming - distance between America and Europe is steadily increasing.
by Oui on Sun Jan 13th, 2019 at 06:00:34 AM EST

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