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The only way the House of Commons can avoid this scenario would be to vote confidence in Corbyn and ask the Queen to to demand Boris' resignation and appoint Corbyn PM.

Assuming that the Supreme Court decides the prorogation is illegal I could well imagine that Commons would vote confidence in Corbyn for an interim government. First, it might be wise to pass a law requiring that Parliament consent to future prorogations, lest Boris immediately again progogue Parliament. Even in that circumstance I could see Bercow refusing prorogation and sending a committee to the Queen seeking Corbyn's appointment. What do you think of the liklihood of these developments?

BTW, does Parliament have a jail to which they could send a dismissed PM who has been found in contempt? Would the Tower do? Or would the Supreme Court be in charge of this action> If Boris wants to go back to the spirit of the first half of the 16th Century regarding the Constitution why should he not be subject to punishments appropriate to that age? Cutting of his head would certainly add an exclamation mark to the end of this particularly grotesque legal time travel experiment.


"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 03:28:09 AM EST
How might the Supreme Court rule? by Joanna Cherry QC MP, plaintiff

Cherry doesn't mention which department of UK "constitution"  would enforce a judgment of the UK Supreme Court.

In the US which branch of government enforces orders of a court?

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 04:17:33 AM EST
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(I for one am puzzled as how to measure the mid-point of a constitutional crisis. I hope the SCOTUK addresses these and other riveting questions relating proper prorogations to legislation by the several parliaments. )

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 05:47:59 AM EST
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Crime and its Punishment in Victorian Hong Kong by Revue Francaise de Civilisation Britannique (FR, EN)

See also Issue XXIV-1 | 2019 | Les Enjeux de l'interdisciplinarité en civilisation britannique

As ethnography goes, these are pretty amusing samples of principles of the ahhh discipline.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 05:59:22 AM EST
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I doubt the UK Supreme Court will find the prorogation illegal - at most somewhat excessive - and perhaps therefore order an earlier return of Parliament as the most appropriate remedy - something I don't think Boris would be too bothered about.

After all, what can Parliament do, prior to October 19th.? Listen to an earlier Queen's speech? How wonderful! Listen to Ministers proclaim what wonderful things they will do with the money they will receive in a budget that will never happen? Riveting. Ventilate its own divisions as to what should happen next? Music to Boris' ears...

The Queen may not receive visitors not sent by her Ministers, and even if she does, one will listen politely and seek the advice and guidance of the PM and President of the Privy Council (Rees-Mogg). Who's this Bercow chappie?

Possession is 9/10ths of the law, and therefore Boris can at most be found guilty of 10% of it. A way will be found for him to purge his contempt. Put not your trust in lawyers! [Psalm 146:3-5 King James Version (KJV), Schnittger Edition].

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 06:16:34 AM EST
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From the mouths of hebrew prophets to you ears, but of course. British convention demands "flexibility."

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 06:39:29 AM EST
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BTW, does Parliament have a jail to which they could send a dismissed PM who has been found in contempt?

They can lock someone in the clocktower, though the last time that happened was 1880. The last time they fined anyone was 1666.

More modern parliaments have put these powers on a statutory basis, both to define them and to prevent challenges.

by IdiotSavant on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 01:58:55 PM EST
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Even with the renovation works going on?
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 02:02:54 PM EST
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That just means an additional sentence of asbestosis.
by IdiotSavant on Thu Sep 19th, 2019 at 10:47:51 AM EST
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