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My conclusion from reading the court coverage is that it is highly likely that the court will rule against the government. As for a constitutional volcanic eruption, that is what the UK has been having for the last month anyway.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Sep 22nd, 2019 at 03:51:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I would be wary of reading this either way, and I think the Guardian is being recklessly optimistic.

This won't be decided on the merits, and in spite of appearances there are no reliable tells from the bench.

It will be decided in behind-the-scenes discussions which will never be made public. We can assume Crown representatives will have a say.

It turns out that Johnson - with current plus-one - was invited to stay with the Queen at Balmoral in April.

I don't find that an encouraging omen.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sun Sep 22nd, 2019 at 04:04:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I can't find a trace of an invitation in April, but in late July-August for early September. Here are a couple of press snips on that:

As per tradition, the monarch extends an invitation to the Prime Minister and their spouse each year to spend a few days each summer at Balmoral.

Prime Ministers and their partners traditionally visit the Queen at her Highlands estate in late summer, typically in the first week of September before the Commons returns after recess. It is believed Mr Johnson and his partner Carrie Symonds will be no different.

The big question for the press being Ms Symonds is not married to Mr Johnson, who is married to another woman.

But it seems all PMs are invited to Balmoral towards the end of the summer hols. Even Corbyn would be (really? Why not, at least he's married to Mrs Corbyn, even if she's his third wife...).

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Sun Sep 22nd, 2019 at 05:07:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually you're right. And it seems the visit didn't go as planned.

Chaos curtains Johnson's first visit to Queen

This is encouraging.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 10:00:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There was already the problem (and Her Majesty takes these things seriously) of the married-man-accompanied-by-his-mistress, never before had such an illicit couple spent a night under Balmoral's lofty roof. (If they were allowed to spend just one night, I bet they were up in the attic with the draughts, the spiders, and the second-rate Scottish ghosts in kilts.)

Here we learn that the advice Boris gave the Queen on prorogation (immediately seconded by the Queen's loyal and trusty Rees-Mogg accompanied by two Tory stooges aka the Privy Council) was kicking up such a stink that a visit of several days was curtailed to less than one. A surprising departure from tradition, if we suppose the Queen was satisfied with the use that had been made of her assent.

Cameron has annoyed the Palace by letting on that he asked the Queen to intervene in the Scottish independence referendum. An interesting thing to note about it is that he says he had a lot of discussion with (Palace) Private Secretaries and so on. Makes one wonder if Boris fully and fairly discussed prorogation with the Queen in person, or at least what unpleasantness (distrust?) the episode has left in its wake.

One may not be amused.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing, Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 02:24:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Last April, Boris was just another ex-Minister of the Crown, amongst many. It would have been "most irregular" to have invited him then, giving the appearance of bestowing Royal Favour upon one of many aspirants to High Office. Now had he been a hunting, gambling, drinking buddy of the Prince Philip up for a merry jaunt that might have been another matter, but AFAIK he doesn't even own a horse! What a Cad!

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 10:50:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
One is not at Balmoral until July.

In April, Scotland is still... One believes the expression is "brass monkeys".

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing, Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 02:29:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
and when it's not brass monkeys, the midges make it all but uninhabitable.

Which gives me an idea for how to punish boris after the revolution...

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 06:59:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is it better to be Queen, titular leader of a smallish country, but who has all sorts of monarchical perks and wealth and news coverage and PR (e.g., the Downton Abbey movie, for crying out loud), or is it better to be the Queen, relic of a now-useless monarchy, gradually diminishing in importance under EU democracy?

If there is actually a volcano-level problem with the UK's constitution (what was it when there were actual riots in the streets of London, and murdered heirs, and dukes duking it out; asteroid-level???), maybe it is better to be Queen of the UK with a hope of regaining some limited executive power under a reworked constitution...

by asdf on Sun Sep 22nd, 2019 at 05:24:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There is nothing within the Treaties governing EU membership preventing the UK bestowing greater powers on HRM beyond the general requirement that the UK be a democracy. Indeed it can be argued that symbols of national uniqueness become more important, not less, in a situation where much sovereignty is pooled and many of the more boring, mundane, technical governmental decisions are taken at EU level.

Regulating food standards, for example, no matter how important and well done, is not the stuff that inspires patriotism, national fervour, and pride in and identification with the worthy organisations which perform such tasks. Insofar as many people need stuff to identify with, be it their favourite football club or their national armed services, identifying with Royalty is possibly less harmful than some other options, even if it does tend to amplify and perpetuate class divisions.

However that is for individual member states to decide. Subsidiarity and all that...

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 11:03:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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