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Cat:"What act of [the Crown in] Parliament provides removal of the PM (so-called executive)? because there some folks shining SCOTUK brilliance."

To my knowledge there is neither such a specific act nor clear common law precedent. The UK is faced with a novel situation here. (Imagine that! The ancestors did not think of everything.) There is, however, the ancient common law tradition that, in such cases, the sovereign 'finds' the law. Parliament is the sovereign, so it will be up to Parliament to find the law.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Sep 25th, 2019 at 03:48:54 PM EST
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The UK has an unwritten constitution and a body of law derived from tradition and acts of the sovereign. For there to be a law prescribing how to remove a rogue PM, some Parliament would have had to have passed that law. Absent exigent circumstances such as the present situation, as the saying goes:"Turkeys don't vote for Christmas." Nor would Monarchs ever have decreed the method by which they could be removed.

It took the entirety of the Stuart Dynasty to establish the principle of Parliamentary sovereignty. It was only during the time of the latter Stuart monarchs that political parties emerged as self conscious entities. And, until the first decades of the 20th Century the House of Lords remained hereditary. At least the UK now has the examples of other governments styling themselves as democratic to which it can look for practical examples of alternate forms of government.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Sep 25th, 2019 at 04:08:29 PM EST
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