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Fifth Columnists, freelance division

Escobar | Behind Hong Kong's Black [Bloc] Terror, 13 Oct

"Revolution in Hong Kong", the previous preferred slogan, at face value a utopian millennial cause, has been in effect drowned by the heroic vandalizing of metro stations, i.e., the public commons; throwing petrol bombs at police officers; and beating up citizens who don't follow the script. To follow these gangs running amok, live, in Central and Kowloon, and also on RTHK, which broadcasts the rampage in real-time, is a mind-numbing experience.

I've sketched before the basic profile [16 Sep] of thousands of young protestors in the streets fully supported by a silent mass of teachers, lawyers, bewigged judges, civil servants and other liberal professionals who gloss over any outrageous act - as long as they are anti-government.

But the key question has to focus on the black blocs, their mob rule on rampage tactics, and who's financing them. Very few people in Hong Kong are willing to discuss it openly. And as I've noted in conversations with informed members of the Hong Kong Football Club, businessmen, art collectors, and social media groups, very few people in Hong Kong - or across Asia for that matter - even know what black blocs are all about.

Vltcheck | Some in Hong Kong Feel Frustrated, as Their City is Losing to Mainland China, 3 Oct

While the Mainland Chinese cities have almost no extreme poverty, (and by the end of 2020 will have zero), in Hong Kong, at least 20% are poor, and many simply cannot afford to live in their own city. Hong Kong is the most expensive place on earth. Just to park a car in could easily cost over US$700 per month, for just working hours. Tiny apartments cost over a million US dollars. Salaries in Hong Kong, however, are not higher than those in London, Paris or Tokyo.

The city is run by an extreme capitalist system, `planned' by corrupt tycoons/developers. The obsolete British legal system here is clearly geared to protect the rich, not the majority. That was essentially why the "Extradition Bill" was proposed: to protect Hong Kong inhabitants from the unbridled, untouchable, as well as unelected de facto rulers.

But there is this `deal', negotiated before Hong Kong was returned where it belongs, which is - to China. "One country, two systems". It is an excellent contract for the turbo-capitalist magnates, and for the pro-Western "activists" [29 Sep]. And it is extremely bad one for the average people of Hong Kong. Therefore, after months of riots sponsored by the West, the Hong Kong administration scrambled the bill.



Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Fri Oct 18th, 2019 at 03:57:18 AM EST
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