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Yes, the term 'furloughed' is not commonly used here and doesn't have legal implications like "redundant" or "laid off". It is associated more with USA usage and has connotations of 'leave of absence', paid or unpaid, by mutual agreement, possibly because of a partial temporary shut down in production. Some workers here have been asked to use up some of their annual leave entitlement while remaining on full pay. The point of the government 70% wage subsidy is to reduce the level of formal redundancies and maintain the link between employer and employees in the hope of a rapid reboot post crisis. Total cost of these measures is €3.7 Billion  for the next 12 weeks, more than enough to wipe out originally projected budget surplus for the year. Basically it will have to be borrowed, although the government does have significant cash reserves at the moment.

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Fri Apr 3rd, 2020 at 01:58:03 PM EST
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On the continent, some countries have a system which is pretty much the equivalent of furlough in English language: people are still paid 70% of their gross salary and can find other employment meanwhile. Called "chômage partiel" or "chômage technique" in France or "cassa integrazione" in Italy.
by Bernard on Fri Apr 3rd, 2020 at 05:59:28 PM EST
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Other euphemisms in English include "gardening leave" = suspension pending disciplinary inquiry and "put out to pasture" = got rid of, possibly with "golden handshake"...

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Fri Apr 3rd, 2020 at 06:38:56 PM EST
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