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Foolish comment added to retweet by security analyst and pro-NATO warmonger ...

Translation:
That such a person takes himself seriously: we have made ourselves vulnerable to blackmail for gas, and then also for nuclear weapons. Deterrence and Ukraine had nothing to do with each other, as there has never been a nuclear guarantee for that country.

Dear Rob, a pre-emptive strike by the Kremlin for the decades of threats from the US, UK, and NATO. Are you just a tool or a fool?

'Sapere aude'

by Oui (Oui) on Mon Jul 25th, 2022 at 06:29:19 PM EST

    In a veiled nuclear threat, he added: "Probably, it's for us so that we can burn the Budapest Memorandum. To make it burn better. But for us it has already burned down in the fire of the Russian troops," Zelensky was referring to the 1994 document, which guided Ukraine's surrender of its nuclear arsenal inherited from the former Soviet Union.


'Sapere aude'
by Oui (Oui) on Mon Jul 25th, 2022 at 06:35:54 PM EST
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The memorandum gave security assurances to three ex-Soviet countries--Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus--following which, along with other agreements signed between 1993-96, the trio gave up its atomic weapons.

An anti-VV Putin rant here @ET in 2008 ...

Matters will escalate. Ukraine is already looking to block Russia's Black Sea Fleet from returning to the naval base in Sevastopol

'Sapere aude'

by Oui (Oui) on Mon Jul 25th, 2022 at 06:38:35 PM EST
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'Sapere aude'
by Oui (Oui) on Mon Jul 25th, 2022 at 07:22:14 PM EST
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Zelenskyy Relieves NSDC First Deputy Secretary Demchenko

'Sapere aude'

by Oui (Oui) on Mon Jul 25th, 2022 at 07:23:50 PM EST
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'Sapere aude'
by Oui (Oui) on Tue Jul 26th, 2022 at 11:18:35 AM EST
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Ukraine, Nuclear Weapons, and Security Assurances at a Glance

At the time of Ukraine's independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, Ukraine held the third largest nuclear arsenal in the world, including an estimated 1,900 strategic warheads, 176 intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), and 44 strategic bombers. By 1996, Ukraine had returned all of its nuclear warheads to Russia in exchange for economic aid and security assurances, and in December 1994, Ukraine became a non-nuclear weapon state-party to the 1968 nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT).

Well intended, but completely off base as this chance for nuclear negotiations passed two decades ago.

'Sapere aude'

by Oui (Oui) on Mon Jul 25th, 2022 at 06:52:49 PM EST
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Nuclear strategy and ending the war in Ukraine | The Hill Opinion - July 19, 2022 |

U.S. nuclear weapons were introduced into Europe in the 1950s as a stopgap measure to defend NATO democracies whose conventional forces were weak. The number of nuclear weapons in those five countries peaked around 7,300 warheads in the 1960s, then dwindled to about 150 today, reflecting NATO's growing conventional strength and its diminishing estimation of the military usefulness of nuclear weapons. But even 150 nuclear weapons could be more than sufficient to touch off a dangerous confrontation with Russia.

The world is as close to the nuclear abyss today as it was during the Cuban Missile Crisis. In fact, contemporary nuclear risks may actually be worse. Whereas Cuban Missile Crisis lasted just 13 days, the fighting in Ukraine will likely continue and tempt fate for many months to come.

Negotiations are therefore essential to defuse nuclear tensions. Even though it has no direct role in the Ukraine war, it's appropriate for NATO to have a role in encouraging negotiations to end it. 

...
NATO's nuclear arsenal failed to deter Russia's invasion of Ukraine and has almost no utility as a weapon of war. But NATO's nuclear weapons can still be put to good use, not by threatening to launch them and escalate the war, but by withdrawing them to make room for new negotiations and eventual peace.

Nobel Peace Laureate Oscar Arias was the President of Costa Rica from 1986 to 1990 and 2006 to 2010. 

Jonathan Granoff is President of the Global Security Institute, and a Nobel Peace Prize nominee.

1) When these bombs were initially deployed, the original targets were eastern European states. But as the Cold War ended, and these states became part of the European Union and in some cases NATO itself, the practice has become provocative, destabilising and dangerous.

There is strong opposition to these weapons being sited in Europe, including from some of the host nation governments. Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands have all, unsuccessfully, called for the removal of US nuclear weapons from their countries.

'Sapere aude'

by Oui (Oui) on Mon Jul 25th, 2022 at 06:53:59 PM EST
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