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Biden's Afghanistan exit decision looks even worse a year later | Op-Ed by Peter Bergen |

Last week, President Joe Biden took a victory lap when he announced that the US had tracked down and killed its most wanted terrorist, al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri, who was living in a house in Kabul, Afghanistan. Don't expect a similar celebration on August 30, the first anniversary of the US troop withdrawal from Afghanistan, which ended the longest war in American history. Any realistic assessment of that action shows that it will long be seen as a defeat rather than a victory -- and it's likely no one will own up to the responsibility for the decision.

The US launched a war against Afghanistan in 2001 after the Taliban regime harbored Osama bin Laden, giving him the ability to plot and carry out the 9/11 terrorist attacks which killed almost 3,000 Americans.

As US and NATO troops battled Taliban and al Qaeda forces, the new US-backed government in Kabul also presided over two decades of progress in Afghanistan. To be sure, Afghanistan wasn't Norway, but it was becoming a somewhat functional, democratizing Central Asian state that saw striking progress in reducing child mortality and increasing life expectancy, one that provided jobs for women and education for millions of girls; it nurtured scores of independent media outlets, and held regular, if flawed, presidential elections.

All of that changed when the US began withdrawing and the Taliban took over the entire country on August 15, 2021. Women's rights evaporated. They have no right to work, except in a narrow set of female-related jobs such as cleaning women's toilets in Kabul; when they travel distances of more than 45 miles they must be accompanied by a male relative, and the Taliban have ordered women to stay at home and to cover themselves completely should they ever venture out. Their male relatives will be punished by the Taliban if women don't follow these directives. Girls do not have the right to be educated after the age of 12.



'Sapere aude'
by Oui (Oui) on Sun Aug 14th, 2022 at 12:09:09 PM EST
The Fall of Kabul ... Interview last Afghan president Ashraf Ghani

Earlier interview 8 Sept. 2021 ...

Ghani Says He Fled Afghanistan to Avoid Kabul Bloodshed

'Sapere aude'

by Oui (Oui) on Sun Aug 14th, 2022 at 12:11:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]


'Sapere aude'
by Oui (Oui) on Sun Aug 14th, 2022 at 12:12:47 PM EST
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