Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.

Too many videos

Yes   0 votes - 0 %
No   2 votes - 100 %
It depends   0 votes - 0 %
 
2 Total Votes
Display:
Here's a waltz that's far from ploddy.

Stan Getz & Bill Evans - Grandfather's Waltz



Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Tue Apr 1st, 2008 at 08:50:01 PM EST
but it's a much forgotten classic video and I was going to post it as a general comment on this subject.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 1st, 2008 at 09:16:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Embedding disabled!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iA8r7nk_oL0

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Wed Apr 2nd, 2008 at 12:00:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks so much rg, can't wait to dig into this.  What a treat.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Wed Apr 2nd, 2008 at 03:30:01 AM EST
Fun with the 9-beat : the brubeck quartet (who liked cutting beats in strange parts) cuts it in Two-Two-Two-Three along with the standard Three-Three-Three (or, how cutting up the beat is as important as it's number) :

Brubeck quartet : Blue rondo a la turk

As you say, an important part of rock riffs is having a note on the "4and", not on the "5":

In this famous riff, the beats are One and Two and Three and Four and Five and Six and Seven and Eight and



Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères

by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Wed Apr 2nd, 2008 at 10:09:07 AM EST


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 2nd, 2008 at 04:59:21 PM EST


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 2nd, 2008 at 05:12:50 PM EST
Minor hit!? I thought it's one of his most known songs!

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 4th, 2008 at 03:11:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This one keeps changing, and at some points if you listen you'll see that drums and melody are running at different speeds

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 2nd, 2008 at 05:58:41 PM EST


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 2nd, 2008 at 06:27:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 2nd, 2008 at 06:22:57 PM EST


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 2nd, 2008 at 07:19:36 PM EST
Excellent!  I love these videos.  If you wanna know, there it is--

Great choices, ceebs.  I really enjoyed them all; each for a different reason.  I really liked the Beatles, no, it's John Lennon singing about love is a warm gun.  Did I mention hills?

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Wed Apr 2nd, 2008 at 07:49:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'll cary on looking, as you say this week is a hard one to find stuff.

(What will the next one be by the way)?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 2nd, 2008 at 07:57:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There's lots in the threes and twos, I think, there must be great archive material--dancing in fields.  Dusty porches and banjos.  Lots of jazz...I'm going to stick with my idea of the eights for a mid point; enough to chew and then chew it.  Fours and threes and twos need elaboration--so sixes and eights elaborate.

I mean, who cares?  As long as the rhythm works and then--where's the melody?  

I enjoyed the Beatles track because there they were, wandering through the beats, rich popstars asking the same questions and with the money to record something different--

All the excellent percussionists--and the public wants melodies--but melody and harmony...so I thought: Melody & Harmony for next week.  How does that sound?

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Wed Apr 2nd, 2008 at 08:25:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ain't that two different diaries ? :)

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères
by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Wed Apr 2nd, 2008 at 08:47:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well neither on their own is a particularly safe google image search. (NSFW in case you hadn't figured it out)

However combined it does give you a page of smut free viewing.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 at 03:59:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
;)

Well, I thought about that...but...hmmm...

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 at 04:32:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Really great selection, and real good education. Discerning rhythym was never my forte, and I wasn't even aware that there is more than 2 or 3 or 4. (In the selection, the one I just failed to 'resolve' was the 6-beat of the Sevillanas, I somehow count five...)

Lemme test myself: is this 8-beat?

UNKLE - Burn My Shadow - 05:26

I only heard a few Broken Social Scene songs on internet radio before, and you guessed right that I like it!

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 at 01:19:58 PM EST
I saw them live in Paris, they were playing as the first part of a Feist concert. It didn't sound so well ; without the clean sound of studio recording (and possibly an not so perfect balance) it became more noise than music.

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères
by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 at 02:35:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Re six beats, Bernstein (I discover) used two versions of the six beat in 'America' from West Side Story--in one line!

First half (6/8 with two beats to the bar):

One  two   three        Four  five  six
I      want   to            be     in    A-

Second half (6/8 with three beats to the bar)

One two Three four Five six)
me            ri              ca

O-kay-by-me-in-A
me--ri--ca--

Ev-ry-thing's-free-in-A
me--ri--ca--

(For-a-small-fee-in-A
me--ri--ca--!)

Just before she starts singing they clap out the rhythm.



Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 at 02:42:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Non-embedding video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSsMGNwYDdg

I'd call that an eight--following my theory.  All the counting, though, it can depend--if you count quick enough it'll be four fours; if you count slow enough it'll be a single four...same with the threes--minuets are in sixes, I look up a minuet by Bach--and the time signature is 3/4--(playing one melody line across two bars instead of keeping it all in one bar)

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 at 02:47:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I know this is 17 beat from your link:

Sufjan Stevens - No Man's Land - 05:01

(And no it wasn't me who made this video :-) )

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 at 02:32:34 PM EST
In the end it seems that this diary is more about time signatures than rythm itself - there is still a diary to be made about more specific rythms such as the syncope etc...

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères
by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 at 03:34:45 PM EST
Yeah...my idea for going through the beats was to hopefully widen the possible range out from the four beat.  This is something I've been writing about for a while, so I thought I'd go through up through the count, using examples to show how the standard rhythms (polka, waltz, etc...) are put together--and how they can be given a natural feel.   I suppose time signatures are ways of writing down various rhythmic forms, so the 6/8 exists--it could be written as two bars of 3/4 but that wouldn't imply the relative emphases--; and that's one type of shorthand.  Using the dance names--minuet, paso doble, buleria (I don't know the names!) is another way.  But I think you're thinking of something else.

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.
by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 at 04:54:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I had a more micro view of rhythm, closer to the one you'd learn when academically studying music : syncope for example, which is when the rhythm is accentuated before the beat (as in Smoke on the Water or I Wanna be in America), the effects of fast or slow rhythms, square rhythm such as found in pop as opposed to the more broken rhythms in rap... Rhythm as only underlying the melody, or as the main feature of the music (think african drums)...

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères
by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 at 07:25:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah yes, accents--the guy who demonstrates the 5 beat goes through three or four different patterns on the five, moving the accents about--I've always liked 7 beat as 3-2-2 but I enjoyed the 4-2-1 of Shoreline.  I had a look at some videos about the various beats in flamenco 12/8--fiendishly complex!

Here's an example, where the guy explains the accents, claps out the accents (and explains clapping techniques)--and he plays well!

Understanding Flamenco - Part 3 (8:11)



Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Fri Apr 4th, 2008 at 04:15:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Display:

Occasional Series