Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.

Which Dostoyevsky character are you?

Fyodor Karamazov   0 votes - 0 %
Dmitri Karamazov   1 vote - 11 %
Ivan Karamazov   0 votes - 0 %
Alexei Karamazov   0 votes - 0 %
Father Zosima   0 votes - 0 %
Nikolai Stavrogin   0 votes - 0 %
Pyotr Verkhovensky   1 vote - 11 %
Kirilov   0 votes - 0 %
Prince Myshkin   2 votes - 22 %
Nastasya Filippovna   2 votes - 22 %
Rogozhin   0 votes - 0 %
Raskolnikov   1 vote - 11 %
Sofia Semyonovna Marmeladova   0 votes - 0 %
The Underground Man   2 votes - 22 %
 
9 Total Votes
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Something's different about the layout here now.  But I don't know what.

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky
by poemless on Thu Feb 26th, 2009 at 06:32:29 PM EST
European Tribune - Odds & Ends: ET as Dostoyevsky Novel Edition
Be kind, and write.

yes...

great diary!

after blogging now for 6 years, (damn, has it really been that long?), i have learned, finally, to make a great distinction.

Comments clash, not people

comments fly out of the opinions posters hold at that moment in time, and as such are purely ephemeral, while people are real, yet we can't know more than tantalising hints of who the real person behind the posts is.

for (most of) those sticking around at ET, there is a sanding down of the spikiness in commenting style, a style that comes in bristling or mouthy (might be a holdover of adequate strategy for getting ahead in meatworld), but here it jars the equilibrium people attain through calmly, candidly and politely challenging each other to grow and optimise communication. it's a splendid school!

it's all too easy for a cherished opinion to give a post a whiff of attitude, and with the world in the state it's in, i dare say many of us are holding dry tinder, needing only a spark to conflagrate.

comments clash, that can be healthy, if civility is retained. thanks for all those who set a good example to me, of how to plug into ET for what's wonderful about it, avoiding all friction.

there are some real peace artists here at the waterhole, i admire that enormously, seeing ever more strife is such a waste of precious time and energy.  

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 26th, 2009 at 08:05:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The description of the Petrashevsky Circle definitely seems applicable to this group. Hell, there's even a crazy power-mad leader named Nicolas involved!

I'm sure the comparison has its limits, but I found it to have some value.

Plus I always enjoy your diaries because the warm my own Russian history-loving heart. If I wasn't linguistically-challenged I might have made 20th century Russia/USSR my PhD field instead of the 20th century USA.

When I was a teenager and read Crime and Punishment in high school I was sure I was Raskolnikov. Perhaps I still am - haven't read the book in about 15 years.

And the world will live as one

by Montereyan (robert at calitics dot com) on Thu Feb 26th, 2009 at 07:09:42 PM EST
I think there are perhaps more Raskolnikovs here than we admit.  

Now people are probably going to read that and think I mean murderers, unfortunately...

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky

by poemless on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 01:15:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Of which I am one, apparently!

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky
by poemless on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 03:24:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have for quite some time had the nagging feeling that we are backing into the 19th century again. Iirc,  Kropotkin mentions the Terrorists among the many revolutionary gruops, taking their name from their wish to strike terror into the heart of th Tsar and his rling clique. Just to pull an example out of the hat.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se
by A swedish kind of death on Thu Feb 26th, 2009 at 07:14:31 PM EST
'The Internet treats Tsarism as damage and routes around it'?
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Feb 26th, 2009 at 07:37:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No kidding.  Masterpiece Theater is showing Oliver Twist, and they introduce it by talking about how Dickens's world is all too painfully similar to our current lives.  

BTW, do they eat Swedish fish in Sweden?  

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky

by poemless on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 01:20:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh yes, but of course it is not called swedish fish here. It is either Pastellfiskar or Salta fiskar (which taste salmiak). And the salmiak one is far more common and popular then the sweet ones. Though apparently there are taste differences. Wikipedia to the rescue

In Sweden the candy is marketed under the name Pastellfiskar, literally "pastel fishes" (in the meaning "pale in color"). Indeed, the fishes in Sweden are much paler in color with the yellow being nearly translucent and cream colored. The exception is the black fish which lacks any translucency. The taste also differs slightly with the Swedish version being somewhat less sweet but more fruit-flavored, especially the yellow one which is more tangy. The green fish, on the other hand, is not lime flavored (the green candy color in Scandinavia is in general associated with apple or pear flavor rather than lime). In texture, they are slightly thicker, have the text "Malaco" instead of "Swedish" embossed, and stick less to the teeth.[original research?]

Mmmm, salmiak. Sweet taste of ammonium chloride.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 02:59:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
salmiak?

It that like licorice?  There used to be a German grocer by me, and they had a whole aisle of strange European licorice candy.  There were these salty, kitty-cat shaped ones...  strange stuff.  

Swedish fish in the States are red and this intensely sweet flavor.  They are addictive.  Something about the texture and the flavor made me reel when I was a kid.  On rare occasions my mother would let me pick out some candy if we were out shopping, and I always got Swedish fish.  Now you can buy them anywhere, but back then, the only place I saw them was at the shopping mall where they had candy in bulk, scooped it out and weighed it for you, like in the olden days.  I think that's what made it a special treat.  

It looks like their slogan is "A Friend You Can EatTM" LOL!

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky

by poemless on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 03:11:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Fish ? Ah, an unconscious acknowledgment that David Lodge's Small World is the more apt comparison with ET :-) - as ceebs puts it: "I refer the author to my previous ... comment".


Last Friday, Stanley Fish wrote an essay in the New York Times attacking the "Civic Responsibility of Higher Education" and everything that document stands for. Fish is a brilliant Milton critic, controversialist, and builder of academic empires. It's said that he's proud to be the model for Morris Zapp, the cigar-chomping, aphorism-dispensing, fast-car-driving, bed-hopping hero/villain of two David Lodge novels, whose ambitions include being the best paid English professor in the world and saying everything that can possibly be said about Jane Austen, so that everyone else will have to shut up about her. The "Civic Responsibility of Higher Education," meanwhile, is a sober and idealistic statement of the university's role in democracy, written by some distinguished members of my organization's Advisory Board and signed by 528 college presidents.

[Lodge picked the right guy to satirize, he comes out with such pompous crap as this:]

    You cannot raise the standard against oppression, or leap into the breach to relieve injustice, and still keep an open mind to every disconcerting fact, or an open ear to the cold voice of doubt. I am satisfied that a scholar who tries to combine those parts sells his birthright for a mess of pottage; that, when the final count is made, it will be found that the impairment of his powers far outweighs any possible contribution to the causes he has espoused. If he is fit to serve in his calling at all, it is only because he has learned not to serve in any other, for his singleness of mind quickly evaporates in the fires of passions, however holy. ("The Spirit of Liberty," p. 138)

http://www.peterlevine.ws/mt/archives/2004/05/stanley-fish-vs.html  (well worth reading)



Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 03:59:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Uhm maybe you should just write your own Odds & Ends: ET as David Lodge Novel Edition.

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky
by poemless on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 04:01:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Please.

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky
by poemless on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 04:01:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Temper, temper :-)

No, to do my own diary on Lodge would ruin the further allusion to Lodge's formal devices by my intertextual interventions here - in my attempt to make THIS even more of a "mosaic of intertexts" (see below) - by playing a Fish/Zapp-like critical commentator role  :-) Here I make further intertextual play with a text on Lodge and intertextuality (as someone interested in literature I think you'll love this  :-) ):

The original title of this paper, proposed to the Advisory Committee of this Conference, was "David Lodge's Small World: Literary Evocations and Intertextuality," ... However, during the course of my readings and re-readings of Lodge's text for this paper, Julia Kristeva's following statement on intertextuality was always in my mind:


Any text is constructed as a mosaic of quotations; any text is the absorption and transformation of another (37).

... So, both to give the title of the paper an intertextual feel by alluding to Kristeva's notion of a text as "a mosaic" and to emphasize Lodge's deliberate but exceedingly playful and sophisticated practice of intertextuality in Small World (hereafter cited as SW) I have re-entitled the paper as
"David Lodge's Small World: A Mosaic of Intertexts.

Anyway - I'm playing here as displacement activity to avoid working on two other diaries :-) And I think, to refer to ceebs (again) referring to Tarantino (himself a major exponent of intertextuality), that if you have character, why identify with a fictional character?  


Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.

by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 04:35:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Salty licorice is salty from the salmiak. It is licorice the way it was meant to be eaten. Sadly appreciated only in a small corner of the world. Though you can ususally get them at IKEA when travelling.

poemless:

There were these salty, kitty-cat shaped ones...  strange stuff.  

Like these?

The sweet fish would be these:

But as you can see in Sweden they are stamped with the company name, as swedish fish makes little sense in Sweden. And the salty one is superior to the sweet ones.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 06:56:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I refer the author to my earlier art comment.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Feb 26th, 2009 at 07:29:09 PM EST
Great diary - shame about the theory :-) Nah, nothing like Dostoyevsky, his work has stuff like murder, not little squabbles, and it's localised. Clearly ET is much more like a David Lodge novel, with its fierce but trivial academic disputes and globalised settings. I was tempted to pick Nice Work for an enirely spurious personal reason. But it has to be "Small World" - how apt :-)


 The reason why I thought of using the Grail legend in Small World is a very simple one. When I started thinking about the novel, I wanted to deal with the phenomenon of global academic travel. The idea came to me at a James Joyce conference in Zurich, which in fact is one of the settings for the novel. I was getting into that international conference-going circuit myself for the first time. Indeed I went straight from Zurich to another conference in Israel. I was intrigued by the conjunction of high-level academic discussion with a certain amount of partying and tourism; by the mixture of cultures; and by the idea of people, all of whom know each other, converging from all over the world on various exotic places to talk about fairly esoteric subjects, and then flying off, only to meet each other again in another exotic venue. This is where I started: a kind of academic comedy of manners, with a global dimension.

http://www.lib.rochester.edu/Camelot/intrvws/lodge.htm

Like ET !  and it includes: "jousting with each other" :-)  

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.

by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Thu Feb 26th, 2009 at 07:34:03 PM EST
Great diary P.

Well, great in the sense that once I started I couldn't put it down and wanted it to keep going.

Since I've never read Mr. D. I can't really say if you are on to something or not and I certainly can't identify myself as a character created by Mr. D. (Actually I did read Notes from the Underground back in Law School in a Law & Literature class, but that was a long time ago and I don't remember much about it except that it was hard to follow).  

And while you've convinced me that I must finally bring myself to read one of Mr. D's BIG novels, it will have to wait until I finish Tolstoy since I committed to Anna Karenina last September and I'm still not finished with it.  (Life interfered.)

by Maryb2004 on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 12:55:53 AM EST
In what sense is it not great?

Forget Tolstoy.  Honestly - I'd rather put pins in my eyes.  How anything can be so epic and tedious at the same time, I don't know.  (I do like his short stories...)  

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky

by poemless on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 01:30:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Are you kidding?  I'm loving Anna - it's a giant soap opera.   With none of that philosophical stuff you say Dostoyevsky has.  No need to think - just enjoy.

Now, I'll grant you that these are characters that go through enormous thought processes to make a decision and then in the next chapter something happens, they change their mind and the whole thought process starts all over again. But since I overthink everything, I'm good with that.

by Maryb2004 on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 02:52:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ok.  Just don't, you know, fling yourself in front of a train or anything...

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky
by poemless on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 03:23:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But the train of history will run over you anyway:


    "In historical events great men - so-called - are but labels serving to give a name to the event, and like labels they have the least possible connection with the event itself. Every action of theirs, that seems to them an act of their own free will, is in an historical sense not free at all, but in bondage to the whole course of previous history, and predestined from all eternity."

Tolstoy, War and Peace



Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 04:49:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well NOW you've ruined it :)
by Maryb2004 on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 04:57:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Some days I think I am The Idiot.

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 03:29:59 AM EST
sorry Migs, that's already taken.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 03:46:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You think you are christ-like?

 

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky

by poemless on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 01:38:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]


you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 04:25:17 AM EST
This may be the funniest poster I've ever seen in my life. I can haz copy?
by PIGL (stevec@boreal.gmail@com) on Sat Feb 28th, 2009 at 10:09:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This may be the funniest poster I've ever seen in my life. I can haz copy?
by PIGL (stevec@boreal.gmail@com) on Sat Feb 28th, 2009 at 10:10:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
duplicate comment alert!

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Feb 28th, 2009 at 10:13:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
therefore, I will refrain from commenting.  However, in the spirit of taking part in your poll, if you are looking for my character, look no further.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 10:56:59 AM EST
To Quote Mr Wolf from Pulp Fiction

Just Because You ARE a Character, Doesn't Mean You HAVE Character.

;-)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 11:00:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Morning/Afternoon ceebs.  When did I ever claim to HAVE character? :)

P.S. Where's the Fri OT?  I've got some stuff, as promised.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.

by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 11:06:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The plot deepens and the eerie similarities go much further:

I am in fact also a follower of Fourier. Well, okay, a different Fourier, but still. At the very least I seem to be using his transform a lot.

As for which character I am: I have read only Crime and Punishment, a long time ago in High School. However the Character Selector for Crime and punishment(scroll all the way down after submitting. you don't have to sing up) informs me that I am:
Dmitri Prokofich Razumikhin

Dmitri Prokofich Razumikhin (Дмитрий Прокофьич Разумихин) - Raskolnikov's loyal and only friend. In terms of Razumikhin's contribution to Dostoevsky's anti-radical thematics, he is intended to represent something of a reconciliation of the pervasive thematic conflict between faith and reason. The fact that his name means reason shows Dostoevsky's desire to employ this faculty as a foundational basis for his Christian faith in God.
by someone (s0me1smail(a)gmail(d)com) on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 01:22:47 PM EST
Oh dear.  I came up as Raskolnikov.  

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky
by poemless on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 01:42:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But I'm afraid you're just another Raskolnikov, because you missed this hint in poemless' roman à clef:

while I am still alive, before I end up in a gulag or murdered by someone

Hmmm, so many murderers around here...

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 01:46:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Me too

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 01:46:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Good grief! Me too!

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 01:51:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Avdotya Romanovna Raskolnikova here with Dmitri Prokofich Razumikhin as close second.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se
by A swedish kind of death on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 03:07:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Omg.  Did other people have "close seconds?"  I had, like, 100% Raskolnikov!  This is freaking me out.  

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky
by poemless on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 03:15:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, I had the same exact combo as Swedish -- what does it mean?!?

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes
by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 04:53:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I look like I'm almost tied between Razumihkin (#1) and Semyon Zakharovich Marmeladov (#2).  

Of course, I have no idea who those characters are but some day it will all make sense to me.

by Maryb2004 on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 04:39:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I come up as Avdotya Romanovna Raskolnikova
with Katerina Ivanovna Marmeladova and Sofya Semyonovna Marmeladova tied for n°2 ...

"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet
by Melanchthon on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 05:04:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You would marry to save your family from shame.

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky
by poemless on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 05:37:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Certainly not!

"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet
by Melanchthon on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 06:21:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No surprise here - as I predicted above, I'm still Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov.

And the world will live as one
by Montereyan (robert at calitics dot com) on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 08:51:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm a hopeless but amiable drunk who indulges in his own suffering

(...)

by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Sat Feb 28th, 2009 at 11:53:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
An excellent read, as usual.

Between the bears and Dostoyevsky, we may have it covered. The two sides of anal. Reason and hormones. There are messages in both.

Watched Shawshank Redemption, would you believe, for the first time today. A very good movie imo. It also appears to continue to top the DVD rental charts, nearly 15 years after it was made. 3 quid in W H Smith. A bargain.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 01:47:30 PM EST
I have trouble believing you've missed it beforehand.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 01:49:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It is true, M'Lud...

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 01:51:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Another point for David Lodge


Lodge invented a literary parlour game called 'Humiliation' in Changing Places, which remains popular at dinner parties. Players name classics of literature that they have not read, the winner being the one who exhibits the most woeful literary lacuna. In Changing Places, Lodge's obnoxious American academic, Howard Ringbaum, admits that he has never read Hamlet - and thus wins the game (but loses his job). Lodge himself owns up to War and Peace.

He seems to be in accird with poemless about Tolstoy.

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.

by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 02:49:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Between Ivan Karamazov (disclaimer:I passed an exam the subject of which was The Great Inquisitor scene) and Prince Mychkin...

"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet
by Melanchthon on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 02:22:37 PM EST
Elaborate, please.  

I think my favorite characters are Myshkin and Nikolai Stavrogin.  I relate most to Nastasia Fillipovna and Ivan.  Sometimes, instead of explaining my "religious" views, I find it easier to just refer people to Ivan's monologue in the chapter, "Rebellion."

It seems Myshkin and Ivan "represent" incompatible ideas.  But in practice, they are somewhat similar, interestingly...


"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky

by poemless on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 02:29:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Your comment is on google already. To clarify it a bit for those of us who haven't read the Bros:


 He demands retribution, and not in some infinite time or space, but here on earth (i.e. Ivan rejects any eschatological solution to the problem). He rejects the view that there is some higher harmony that these things serve (i.e. he rejects any aesthetic conception of evil), declares that he could not accept any harmony that required the intense sufferings of such innocent children, and ends with a statement of rebellion against God, saying:

    "It's not God that I don't accept, Alyosha, only I most respectfully return Him the ticket." (Karamazov, p. 226)

The force of Ivan's indictment of the world's injustice is so great that he compels even Alyosha to admit that the situation as described requires rebellion.

    "Rebellion? I'm sorry you call it that," said Ivan earnestly. "One can hardly live in rebellion, and I want to live. Tell me yourself, I challenge you -- answer. Imagine that you are creating a fabric of human destiny with the object of making men happy in the end, giving them peace and rest at last, but that it was essential and inevitable to torture to death only one tiny creature -- that little child beating its breast with its fist, for instance -- and to found that edifice on its unavenged tears, would you consent to bet the architect on those conditions? Tell me, and tell the truth." "No, I wouldn't consent," said Alyosha softly. (Ibid.)

http://www.tparents.org/Library/Unification/Talks/Eby/Eby-Theodicy-b.htm



Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 03:04:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks.

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky
by poemless on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 03:22:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Who chose Verkhovensky?

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky
by poemless on Fri Feb 27th, 2009 at 03:25:15 PM EST
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