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HAMAS the new nobody

by name Thu Jan 26th, 2006 at 11:39:06 AM EST

back when these things were still accepted as supreme truth, theodor herzl (or whoever) proclaimed that palestine was "a land without people for a people without land" - according to the jewish/zionist sagas nobody was there before the jews to legitimately claim the land. after herzl came golda meir with her assertion that there was no political partner on the palestinian side, in fact, that there was nobody there at all (i wonder who ariel and others like him had been murdering all those years).


then came arafat, who managed to make himself and the cause of palestinians heared by the world, who managed to make the UN accept him, who practically forced the israeli side to concede that there was, in fact, a political will and a partner for negotiations on the palestinian side.

arafats fatah was for many years the political party/movement of choice for palestinians until, over time, it descended more and more into a mire of corruption, crime, subversion and finally came under the control of the money grubbing mafia and US/EU/israel stooges who head it today.

the good things of fatah were that they could always readily be accused of terrorism, crime, corruption, of being non-representative, whatever. it was thus easy to dismiss them as nobody for a variety of reasons, real and contrived.

today the hamas, a religious movement helped into existence by israel to counter the secular fatah, won the elections in a landslide. palestinians were more or less fed-up with the mismanagement and lack of legitimacy of the new, post-arafat 'leadership' so dear to everybody else.

during the past years israel has been busy murdering hamas' less radical leaders: yassin and al-rantisi come to mind, both of whom had shown themselves inclined to dialogue, to make a just peace with israel but not without concessions on the israeli side. what is left today from hamas' leadership is probably far more radical and militant than the dead old guard, likely far less inclined to concessions than the current fatah and the previous generation of hamas. this and the fact that in public opinion they are perceived as far less corrupt than the current fatah honchos makes them popular, representative of the political basis and thus dangerous to US/EU/israeli colonialist interests.

after a couple of conveniently timed suicide bombings in israeli pizzerias and coffee shops, and perhaps even across the EU - especially in countries where sympathy for the palestinian cause and/or distrust of israel run high - hamas will go the way of all political movements perceived as legitimate by palestinian majority: they will become the eternal nobody of palestinian politics until they have been delegitimized, subverted and corrupted enough for israeli, EU and US taste.

when that has happened, the game will start over: hamas will drown in a sump of corruption and crime, open season will be declared on their leadership for real and contrived acts of "terrorism" as scary as saddam's nukes, the palestinians will eventually reject them and elect by landslide another contender in the political arena, who in turn will be declared the new nobody.

nobody has died. long live the new nobody !

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Very good diary. Not sure everyone wiil agree but worse, not everyone will understand it. I hope I'm wrong.
by Euroliberal on Thu Jan 26th, 2006 at 01:53:24 PM EST
name has caused quite a few blisters around here with his diaries and comments on Israel, but this one is spot-on.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Jan 26th, 2006 at 01:55:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
same thing happens everywhere. This is a subject that's a hard nut to crack.
by Euroliberal on Thu Jan 26th, 2006 at 03:16:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
  • do I understand you correctly when I read you post as suggesting that future suicide bombings in Israel or Europe should be considered, possibly, as manipulations to decredibilise Hamas?

  • do you really think that the new leadership is less moderate than Sheik Yassin?


In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 26th, 2006 at 05:23:24 PM EST
He did say real and contrived. Considering the Spanish People's Party still claims that "it has not been ruled out" that ETA played a role in the March 11 Madrid bombings, you can't rule out that any violent incident will be blamed on Hamas whether or not it's them that instigated or carried it out. This is not to pre-judge the likelyhood of Hamas actually carrying out additional terrorist attacks.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 05:53:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Another question, of course, deals with Israel's policy of targeted assassinations of the Hamas leadership, and whether they will deem it appropriate to "take out" sitting members of the Palestinian parliament....
by the stormy present (stormypresent aaaaaaat gmail etc) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 12:18:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Never mind parlamentarians, how about 9-year-old girls? This is from deep in an article from today's breakfast:
The Independent: Hamas scores stunning win - but what happens now?
As Ahmad Qureia, the Palestinian Prime Minister, and the cabinet resigned in response to the defeat, gunfire broke out between Fatah supporters and Hamas activists in Ramallah. More ominously, Israeli soldiers shot dead a 9-year-old Palestinian girl in the Gaza Strip near the border with Israel. They later claimed she was carrying a large bag and ignored warning shots.
Meanwhile, Israel has started a diplomatic offensive to isolate Hamas, one of whose objectives is to stop all international donations to the Palestinian Authority in order to bankrupt Hamas.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 12:31:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, I suspect that's why Bush sounded so untroubled about the Hamas election victory in his press conference yesterday.  He knows they're being set up to fail.

From the LA Times

"Starting tomorrow, who is going to pay the salaries of 150,000 civil servants without money from donor countries, who will almost certainly stop giving them money?" asked Amnon Lipkin-Shahak, a former Israeli army chief of staff who has participated in negotiations with the Palestinians.

I also think the Muslim Brotherhood here in Egypt approached its parliamentary elections in a much smarter way than Hamas.  The Brotherhood would have won outright in a fair election (which it wasn't) if they'd fielded candidates in all the constituencies.  But they fielded only 150 candidates (there are 444 seats) partly, I think because the leadership was aware that with a parliamentary majority, they'd actually be expected to achieve something, which working within the system here would be practially impossible.

Of course, they were also aware that Mubarak et al would never have let them run if they'd put up candidates for all the seats, so it's only partly comparable.

by the stormy present (stormypresent aaaaaaat gmail etc) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 01:36:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The independent mentioned 100,000 civil servants loyal to Fatah.

When have you seen Bush actually troubled at a press conference? I mean, for comparison.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 04:56:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
OK, good question.  That would be pretty much never.

Wait... Actually, he looked really put out when talking about who leaked the warrantless domestic spying program to the NY Times.  So leaks trouble him, but nothing else seems to.

by the stormy present (stormypresent aaaaaaat gmail etc) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 09:50:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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