Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.

Internet Freedoms in France, part 00000110

by Alex in Toulouse Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 11:13:08 AM EST

I'll be monitoring debates at the French Assemblée Nationale (lower house of parliament) today, concerning the infamous DADVSI law ... and commenting here. This will be the 6th day of debate over a period of 4 months.

Promoted by Colman and bumped by Jerome


Past diaries on this topic:

French internet Law update
French govt: "privacy is overrated"
France: revolt on Internet intellectual property rights?
French move to outlaw open-source software?

See also:
The Pirates of Sweden

---

For your information, the image above is a parody of Google based on the term "Majors" which is used in France (and maybe elsewhere?) to define companies like Sony, Vinvendi etc which monopolise the entertainment media industry.

Links such as "images" etc all have a copyright symbol added to them, a button "free search" has been greyed out and only the button "I have money" is available.
etc etc

Display:
In the meantime, the talks are for now on the CPE job contract, and a Socialist "député" (member of parliament) has just said, ironically:

"With this wonderful new contract, a MacDonald's personnel manager will now have 732 days to decide whether a young box carrier is alright for his job"

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 09:37:35 AM EST
A few really good amendements have just been thrown away by the UMP.

Though it was brilliantly argued that we would be in line with other European countries if they had passed.

Ok, it's official, we're regressing.

These were still only about private copies, but we'll soon get to the really nasty parts of this law (ie the DRM and inter-operability parts).

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 10:40:36 AM EST
You know what? This is too depressing.

I'll comment when I can, but for now I'm listening half-hearteadly.

I've never seen such a concentrated and distributed lack of intelligence in a group of people (UMP députés), and it's making me mad.

The Conseil Economique et Social, a consultative public organism, has released a memo a few days ago explaining that downloading should be cosidered as an act of private copying, and not of piracy (just like it is in a majority of European countries).

The union of teachers in France has declared that it would start civil disobediance about this law, as this law does not provide them with an exception clause that enables them to show what they want to their students. (ie they can now only show 30 seconds of a music clip, etc)

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 10:53:56 AM EST
Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 05:06:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Come to Washington DC

"I said, 'Wait a minute, Chester, You know I'm a peaceful man...'" Robbie Robertson
by NearlyNormal on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 06:37:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's official, the law now maintains the tax on blank media (CDs etc) to compensate for private copies, while forbidding private copies.

Talk about being brutally incompetent ... and who pays the price? Us.

Also, instead of the "global licence", ie a tax compensating for private copies on downloads, the government wants to put fines into place. This de facto creates a shift in revenues towards the government's budget, rather that to artists.

I think we've already mentioned this, afew or I, in one of the past diaries, but today it's been voted and confirmed.

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 12:50:49 PM EST
Pure brilliance. I'm impressed by that.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 12:52:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A member of the Green party asked "But why make people pay for private copies on their blank media, if you want to generalize DRMs that prevent private copies? Besides, not everyone buys CDs to music or movies"

To which the minister interrupted her with something along the lines of: "yeah right, and why else would people buy blank CDs"

Green woman: "euh, companies and individuals may also use them for archving data, such as photos of your family for example"

Sheesh!

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 12:56:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And what if mail order CDs from outside France?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 01:00:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes this has been commented on various forums I visit, and I myself used to buy CDs in Luxemburg (because they weren't taxed).

But no one seems to have mentioned that a few months ago, some complementary customs directive was passed ... it argued that something purchased online in France, is still subject to French tax laws (or something like that, I don't exactly remember)

So you now have to physically go to the right office in Paris to get a form, complete it etc, before you can legally purchase CDs in Luxemburg.

No one in the public knows this of course, and only a few Luxemburgian CD-selling websites have mentioned this (in the form of a warning to French clients that they had to get that form filled).

What happened to European free-trade laws? What's going on?

Has everyone gone mad?

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 01:08:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So far, each time opponents to this law have developped a very strong argumentation about some terrible limitations this law will cause, to hospitals that archive data, etc etc, and more generally each time the opposition says something logical, the UMP answers "it's a European directive we have to implement". It's always Europe's fault!

But the truth is that the European directive is minimalistic, and several countries have implemented it this way. And that France is trying to go a lot further than the original directive. To the point of being absurd and near-fachist.

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 01:04:57 PM EST
My favourite excuse. Did anyone ask if France has any little influence over the EU?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 01:07:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No one did.
by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 01:18:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Earlier, Christian Paul (Socialist) read to the other members of Parliament, an email he had received from a French citizen.

It goes something like this:

"Mr Minister, copyright on a particular media, is valid for 130 years. Please explain to me how your plan to implement DRMs everywhere, with an alleged 0-5 private copies allowed via copy mechanisms planned inside these DRMs, will make it possible for anyone to have a private copy that still works in 130 years, when technology will have totally change?"

(ie. if you're only allowed to make yourself 0-5 private copies only via a DRM, then how would you copy an old 8mm film onto a DVD, for example, if these represented two technological forms spread over 130 years).

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 01:15:03 PM EST
Or better said:

"will 0-5 copies be enough to migrate your media over 130 years, to pass it along different technological gadgets and hopefully pass it on to your kids etc?"

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 01:16:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ps: the 0 to 5 number is real, ie the Minister has claimed that he has not forbidden private copies, but that these would now be dependent on the DRMs on each media (so up to the companies making them), with the possibility of a private commission reviewing the number of copies every so and so.

pfff

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 01:18:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
pfff is the word.

If the majors get DRMs out, it won't be to allow copies.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 02:40:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The government, trying to appear magnanimous, has just accepted a Socialist/UDF(center-right) amendment exonerating the medical & educational world from the blank media tax.

They want to make it appear as though this is progress. pfff.

Why should schools or hospitals have to pay a tax financing pop singers anyhow?

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 01:24:15 PM EST
No, my mistake ... the government rejected it for Education (only Medical).

Ok schools and universities must keep on financing Michael Jackson ...

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 01:25:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ooops, my mistake again, not even Medical, only the field of "Medical Imagery" (which uses a lot of blank media probably)

Wow ... but don't be fooled, it's not because they will pay Michael Jackson that hospitals in France will now have the right to play his music in the hallways. That's a different matter altogether and concerns a seperate sum to pay to the SACEM.

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 01:28:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ok, we are now finally talking about DRMs (Digital Rights Management devices - ie. technical copy protection methods, like Sony's infamous Rootkit) and inter-operability.

Christian Paul (Socialist) has just asked the Minister to define the term "inter-operability" because he says he "fears that the government has no clue as to what it is".

The Minister's answer in a few minutes?

ps: forgive me for typos, grammar mistakes etc, I'm in a hurry and typing in two places (while listening to the debates)

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 01:55:08 PM EST
The problem is that DRM and inter-operable are not terms that are, well, inter-operable!

Still waiting for the Minister's definition ... there seems to be some rebellion in his ranks.

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 02:00:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One of the UMP rebels laboriously details how a DRM online test works. And then explains that as soon as you want to listen to your song on another player than the iPod on which you purchased it ... the same laborious stuff gets into place and at the end rejects your demand.

Still waiting for what the Minister will have to say to this. My bet: "we are proposing a very modern law, inter-operability will be present, let us not engage in partisan politics..."

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 02:04:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Christine Boutin (another UMP rebel) explains that future DRMs will be implemented directly into processors, and since Europe does not produce any processors, we will be totally losing the control of our PCs to foreign PRIVATE firms.
by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 02:07:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If any positive amendment passes, it will be this one.
The suspense is on ...

I think a lot of potential rebels in the government's majority are scared of what limited operability, and a return to the dark ages of computing (remember, before USB plugs, when everyone had their own standard?) could mean. Since DRMs and inter-operability are incompatible, this whole law may crash once again (which only serves to prove that this entire law has poorly prepared).

Open Source software is now being discussed. "How can one legally write free an open software OS that would circumvent DRMs directly built inside of computer chips?" asks a député.

This would indeed be the end of open source sofware ... which is unconceivable, given the potential for innovation that they represent.

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 02:13:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nope, it didn't pass.

There are more amendments to come on this issue (of inter-operability), but when the first one gets rejected, this kind of hints at what's to come ... ie. a disastrous result for the Open Source community and for the future of privacy on the net, here in France.

Ok, they've all gone to eat now, and I'll go and smash a brick with my right fist or something.

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 02:28:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
For info, this intelligent amendment (number 137) which has just been rejected, stated:

"Manufacturers and exploitants will be provided all items necessary to accomplish inter-operability"

So it didn't pass, and thus, to give you an example of what this means:

Microsoft is no longer obliged to give out details about the .doc format to the Open Office suite developers. At least in France, that is. Well not that it had to provide these details in the past, but at least in the past you could decompile and figure out the format on your own ... now if you do that, you risk 3 years of jail and a 300 000 euro fine.

Well ok, I'm exagerating ... maybe not for the .doc format, but you get the idea of where this is going to take us. Particularly if you give private companies the legal protection to impose whatever reign they choose. Do you think Microsoft is going to be friendly and altruistic, knowing that it's already been condemned for market position abuse here in Europe?

Other amendments are to come in the area of inter-operability, this was only the first one to be discussed. But like I said, if the government rejects this one, we all know where this is going.

Hahaha (sad laughter), the government is trying to take us back into the eighties (of computing)!

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 02:45:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Minister's reply (I'm summarizing): "democracy is great, DRMs are not that bad blablaba"

He still hasn't defined "inter-operability", neither even mentioned it (though he has been mentionining it for months before this question, saying before that "our law will make us a modern pioneer in Europe when it comes to inter-operability"). Utter bullshit.

I think the Socialists will again ask him to define this term, and block parliament until he does.

Maybe we have a small chance here.

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 02:23:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Here it comes: "it is the freedom to choose the software and medium you want, and to access something that you purchase whichever way you choose".

Ok, so he knows the definition (more or less). But then?

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 02:24:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
My first rection to this is that you don't know how good you have it if the legislation you are stressed out about is one putting taxes on blank CD's....

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire
by p------- on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 02:11:44 PM EST
That's Article I of the law (private copies, taxes, blank CDs).

They've now finally started talking about the really horrible aspects of this law ... the other Articles.

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 02:14:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Giving free reign to DRMs, and forbidding any measures that circumvent them, means watching every exchange on the internet to make sure they are in conformity with, and do not endanger, the DRMs in place. This will be the end of all privacy. (think Microsoft Vista for example)

The blank media tax and related issues, represent an important aspect of this law, sure ... but don't worry, these are not the aspects that I'm worried about (only the ones that I find most ridiculous).

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 02:18:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well that's reassuring, I mean, well, you know what I mean.

Still doesn't hold a flame to the Patriot Act.  But you are getting there ... ;)

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire

by p------- on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 03:03:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
IBM has announced they will not upgrade their in-house windows workstations to M$ Vista... That should get people thinking, but it won't.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 05:40:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A Communiste député (Dutoit), just proposed to add labels to CDs equipped with DRMs:

"This CD is dangerous for your computer".

hehehe

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 04:09:01 PM EST
Works for me.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 04:15:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Interesting turn of events.

The government seems to want the Army to be provided with any DRM source code that may threaten, in whatever way, national security.

Microsoft recently refused this in the UK.

This should be interesting ...

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 04:36:33 PM EST
More on this. The government wants to pass an amendment precisely stating that to prevent Administrations & Companies from being threatened by DRMs, DRMs source code must be provided to the State.

The thing is, the same amendment has, in its summary, "Administrations, Comanies, and Individuals".

This has prompted a Green member to point out that the State acknowledges that every computer is at risk, but is willing to protect only its Administrations and French Companies  (and not individuals).

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 04:47:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wankers.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 04:47:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That one is a no-brainer: national security requires open source, or at least that the vendor disclose the full source code to the government.

Who in their right mind would deploy software into, say, the control systems of a nuclear weapons facility, that hasn't been verified by the computer security staff and compiled in-house?

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 05:13:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
On the Navy base near Landivisio (Britanny), almost every PC is equipped with Windows NT. (I know this from an insider). You won't believe how foolish people can be ...
by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 05:15:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And every goon has administrator access to the computer (because that's the only way to get anything done under Windows) and they get their regular "automatic updates" from Microsoft...

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 05:19:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That was one of the first things that got me laughing tonight!

And you know ... knowing a bit about how the French Navy works (someone from my family is there), I can confirm that these guys are clueless about everything concerning personal computers. They have nice systems when it comes to avionics and such, but everyone uses Windows NT and they probably do have the "automatic update" server running !!

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 05:27:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ok, how hard it is for someone to intercept the outgoing internet connection, insert a router, and "pretend" to be microsoft, and send in an "update" with a trojan?

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 05:33:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Probably quite simple!

Besides, they probably still use CRC monitors without any security mechanisms whatsoever (their emissions can be measured and converted into the actual screen content)

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 05:38:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have a friend working on IT systems for the French Army, and they have a simple, sensible rule: sensitive work is done on computers that are not connected to anything in any way. No external links, no external disks, no plugs, nothing. No information in, no information out of that particular workstation.

Not sure how they do backups, though.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 05:57:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Probably using blank CDs bought from Luxembourg.

Total isolation is SOP for sensitive military computing. But this subject reminds me of the difference between administrators and technocrats. No one who really understood the issues would be proposing this kind of legislation.

So - a farce. Entertaining, in a rather chilling way, for those of us who aren't personally involved.

But sooner or later they'll be going after independent blogs.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 06:18:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You're very right about blogs, the Minister has announced that this law is only the first among many, and that his next step will be to do something about the dissemination of news on the internet. According to him, journalist is a profession and only accredited people should report the news on the internet.

The good news is, in 13 months we elect a new president and a new lower parliament here in France ... so we can always stop this nonsense before it goes too far.

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 06:22:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Please reassure me that these idiots won't be reelected.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 06:45:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have a bad feeling that Sarkozy (aka as Napoleon IV) may get elected president next year, but the parliament cannot possibly go to the right this time (which will make France de facto a left-wing country, as there is only so much that the President can do to screw them, besides dissolving parliament and calling for a new election ... which everyone would punish him for, I think).
by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 06:50:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This is becoming surreal. A député has just cited two users of the French forum on which I am discussing this law ("Libertés Numériques" in http://forum.framasoft.org)

I was just chatting with them as I type, and they get cited by their usernames live at Parliament!

Excellent!!!

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 05:03:29 PM EST
Like I said, this is direct democracy at work:

The député Wauquiez just said live at parliament: "this is addressed to antistress, kebra, Milvus" and 2 others whose names I didn't note, maybe mine :)))

http://forum.framasoft.org/viewtopic.php?t=15059&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=3180

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 05:06:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
La Ligue Odebi (http:www.odebi.org => website down earlier, possibly shut down by the police), a respected voice here in France on issues concerning internet freedoms, has just launched a call for digital disobedience.

http://www.odebi.org/new/theme/

Since no exception from the blank media tax has been declared for hospitals, the Odebi Ligue calls all French internet users to download massively, as many illegal things as they can, in order to steal from the pockets of artists as much as artists will now be stealing from our hospitals.

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 06:26:58 PM EST
We now have 2 députés on the framasoft forums.

Vanneste, the man leading the Commission that wrote this law (username "desesperately")

Wauquiez, the député who cited some of us live at Parliament. (his username is his name)

I had a bit of a run-in with Vanneste a few days ago, concerning Illegal Primes. I explained to him on his personal blog that this would be a problem and that there was thus no way for his law to control everything, and he came back to our forum after a month of absence there, to specifically target my comments there about Illegal Primes, calling them "juridically ridiculous". After which he proceeded with a call for the deletion of the French Wikipedia page explaining Illegal Primes.

ps: my username on the framasoft forums is "moddeur"

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 06:35:27 PM EST
Why are the Framasoft forums visited by députés and their consultants (many have indeed declared visiting them)?

Because they are linked to by the http://www.eucd.info initiative which gathered 150 000 signatures in a petition against this law.

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 06:39:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ps: Wauquiez has been confirmed by a moderator since he used his email at the Assemblée Nationale to receive a link to validate his new user profile.

About Vanneste I need to confirm, but I'm quite sure I saw a moderator confirm him as well.

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 08:15:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Since Laurent Wauquiez's (député ie. member of lower parliament / UMP Haute-Loire) identity on the Framasoft forums has now been confirmed by his Secretariat, let me share with you the 3 exchanges I made with him yesterday evening (read the entire thread in French here)

1)

Alex (user "moddeur"):
"And on a scale of 0 to 9 ( 0 = inexistant , 9 = extreme), how would you qualify the pressure that cadres of the UMP party have exerted on rebels such as you, and members of parliament Suguenot, Cazenave etc?"

Wauquiez:
"10"

2)

Alex (user "moddeur"):
"I think that several of us here will willingly contribute money to buy you several boxes of yummy appetizers if you pronounce the words "Long Live Open Source Software" tomorrow at the Assemblée Nationale (ie. the Lower House of Parliament)

No response.

3)

Wauquiez (the député):
"it's difficult to hold a debate with some of you"

User Sythuzuma-Ka:
"such is life on online forums and in communities ... this being said, annoying people are not always annoying, and inversely"

Alex (user "moddeur"):
"Absolutely, moods vary according to the rythms of life ... this morning I got up on the wrong foot and had a chip on my shoulder. Now I'm full of zest and wouldn't mind exchanging a few word puns with a Member of Parliament"

Wauquiez
"lol it'll have to wait until tomorrow or else I'll be getting more remarks from satan - that name suits you well, by the way" (note: his remark concerns another user: "S-ATAn" who was close to insulting the Député all the time)

ps: the guy said "lol" several times (he's the youngest member of parliament, 31 years old)

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 08:45:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Alex - great live reporting. I have one technical question. Where are you getting your live Assemblée Nationale proceedings from? Is it streamning online or on the radio or ??
by Alexandra in WMass (alexandra_wmass[a|t]yahoo[d|o|t]fr) on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 08:35:44 PM EST
Hi Alex.

I watched the webcasts (they're now in bed so you won't see anything there): http://www.assemblee-nationale.fr/12/seance/seancedirect.asp

La Chaîne Parlementaire (LCP) is another way to watch (but I think it's cable only, and besides you're not in France)

You can also download partial or complete videos for debates of previous days on the framasoft forums:

http://wiki.framasoft.info/EUCD/TelechargerLesD%e9bats

by Alex in Toulouse on Tue Mar 14th, 2006 at 08:51:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Merci merci!! I had no idea they had live streaming video of the Assemble Nationale. Great!!
by Alexandra in WMass (alexandra_wmass[a|t]yahoo[d|o|t]fr) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 09:34:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You're in for pain, right now the Socialists have left, angrily (after accusations of spinelessness from the right). There are shouts, protests ... the President of the Assemblée, that idiot Debré, is saying "yeah yeah go out, you are ridiculous".
by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 09:51:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What a shrill, that Debre.

I see a French Pirate Party contesting the next parliamentary elections...

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 09:56:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That would be really nice, but I dare say it probably can only work in a country with a small population, like Sweden.

For France I see massive protests around the youth job contract (CPE), I see Sarkozy resigning from the office of Minister of the Interior when it'll be appropriate for him to do so (in order not to be associated with the brutality of the police force on the children of France ... as his last slick move to seduce the masses ... because the average French person may be dumb enough to think that it's a good thing when the police beats us "rebellious foreign-born youths in the suburbs", but they will think otherwise when they see their own kids being beaten up). In 1995 the country was paralysed with a far less ambitious job contract. This Saturday there will be the first mixed (students & workers) demonstrations. I'll be joining in Toulouse and will try to take some pictures and post them here. Then again, there are those 3 rugby matches in the afternoon so I won't stay too long ... just long enough to scand a few slogans like "We don't want jobs, we want money and fame!" (mixing in with the students, who'll all be staring at me and thinking I'm with the secret service, what with being 10 years older than them and holding a camera).

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 10:11:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Which reminds me that I need to call a friend's kid's boyfriend, who's 18-something and who'll be there. This way I can infiltrate the students with him. I'll only need to wear a teenage outfit or something and use teenspeak.
by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 10:14:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Of course. Blue Hawaian shirt indicated. With Bermudas and tongs?
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 10:50:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Have you posted links to the Pirates of Sweden diary in your internaute forums?

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 10:15:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's there at the top of this page. afew was the first to mention in one of the French internet diaries that the Swedish Pirate diary was related.
by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 10:17:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
So, why haven't your friends flooded ET?

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 10:23:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They're not all very fluent in English. But some have visited a few diaries (for example I was told about the excellent article on the French banlieues by that French teacher in the US, forgot your name sorry!!, and afew's diary on handicapped & unemployment figures in the UK was also mentioned).

Some of my friends have a blog of their own, but it's hard left and in favour of degrowth (focuses on climate issues, Chiapas and such things): http://lalisteasuivre.blog4ever.com/blog/index-4524.html

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 10:29:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They're not all very fluent in English.
See what we're missing out on for not being multi-lingual? If they're all half as funny as you are...

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 10:33:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There is this great picture on my friend's blog (from Charb, a cartoonist in Charlie Hebdo magazine):

It's about the recent riots in France, is entitled "how to talk to scum" and shows this adult saying:

  • "you're contributing to global warming!!"
  • "bouuuhouuu sorry Mister"

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 10:39:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If we could get Charb on ET...
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 10:53:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The government passed an amendment allowing private copies from TV (probably because that's the only thing they are familiar with, ie. recording with a VCR!).

This is crazy (but good), and shows how dumb they are. TV is about to become totally digital, and is bound to be linked to the internet like it is to some extend in Japan (and is already very interactive with satellite packages like TPS or CanalSat)

So I can copy anything I see on digital TV, but not on the internet? hehe

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 10:56:54 AM EST
Dutoit (Communist), points out:

"since we are now maintaining a tax for private copies, but are now no longer allowed to make private copies, we have just provided French people with a new right ... the right not to make any copies, how innovating!"

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 11:10:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In fact, the right to be deprived of a long-standing right and to pay for it.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 11:17:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This député's (Dutoit) collaborator for this law is available on the FramaSoft forums (right now), if you have any questions to ask him, live:

http://forum.framasoft.org/viewtopic.php?t=15394&start=0&postdays=0&postorder=asc&hi ghlight=

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 12:29:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Got back here too late.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 03:33:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
PC TV cards, anyone?

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 11:16:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The number of private copies allowed for every media will be fixed by a "Mediator College" (comprised of private company representatives and other actors of this industry).

In other words, if Sony decides that 0 copies for DVDs is what should be allowed, then 0 copies is what you'll get.

This de facto takes the issue of private copies out of the hands of legislators.

And Europe cannot be blamed here, as the 2001 European directive only states, in a typical freely interpretable manner (article 5): "Member States may or may not, implement exceptions [..] for private copies"

Text of the Directive (in French, sorry no time to find the English text as I am watching the debates and commenting on Framasoft at the same time):
http://www.freescape.eu.org/biblio/IMG/pdf/directive_ue_auteurs.pdf

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 12:15:32 PM EST
This Mediator College will be comprised of 24 members:

12 from major distributors (Sony, Vivendi etc)

6 from industrials (those that create blank media and hardware, I suppose)

6 from consumer protection groups

--

Now you do the math ...

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 02:05:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was listening to them talk about this Mediator College (plus some other organism they want to create). I don't know what chance this has of ever really functioning, other than they all meet and have lunch in a good restaurant.

OTOH, when the software and cultural content people get their DRMs legally in place, and open-source software dealing with the DRMs is illegal, then the DRMs will be the law.

That's why the minister and government are sorcerer's apprentices.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 03:31:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
About the P2P issue:

I was just thinking (and commenting this on framasoft) that Google will become illegal. Because it links to illegal content as much as P2P software like eMule does. Neither Google nor eMule physically hold any illegal media, but they both point to media locations ... which is a felony under this new law.

So if they want to shut down eMule, then why not shut down Google?

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 03:36:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They're about to vote on the Vivendi amendment.
It states that any software that is "obviously" used for piracy, will be illegal.
Firegox, Internet Explorer ... everything will just become illegal.

This is tremendously horrible.

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 03:56:06 PM EST
Any software "obviously" enabling file-sharing and not containing any DRMs, will be illegal.

Shit, this is really scary (it was always the scariest one in this law, but I hadn't quite prepared myself for the actual vote on it).

I think it's going to pass, this will be the end of internet innovation in France. And of freedom ...

This is it.

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 04:00:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Earlier today, there was a scandal at the Assemblée, when a UMP député said that he was scandalised by the comments of a Socialist Regional Counsellor on his region's website. The Socialists had then all left the Assemblée.

Right now, as they are discussing this horrible Vivendi amendment, Billard (Green députée), explains that the regional website I mention above was hijacked, and that anti-semitic etc crap was placed on it. But does this mean that internet should be made illegal, she asked? Internet is also used to transfer pedophilia content she went on ... but should internet be made illegal for this? Thus, even if some software is used to share illegal files, if it also shares legal files, should we make it illegal?

Other comparisons used: "should we make hammers illegal, because they can hurt people? should we make hunting rifles totally illegal because Dick Cheney shot his friend? should not instead find ways to control their usage?"

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 04:12:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
On the positive side - isn't this completely unenforceable? They can't seriously expect to ban Firefox and Google.

For one thing France will become the laughing stock of the rest of the planet if people start being jailed for using Firefox. For another - it's not going to last, is it? People will start dumping truck loads of blank CDs outside government buildings and setting fire to things.

My guess is the government will be dead before these laws start being enforced to their maximum possible extent.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 04:18:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm exagerating about Firefox, but be extension Firefox should theoretically become illegal too. (for now they are concentrating on Bit Torrent etc)

They argue that they only want to authorize file-sharing used for research only or sharing (in piracy) non-copyright protected stuff.

The thing they don't understand, is that even if the scientific community wrote a new P2P software to exchange their researche, it would at some point escape into the general public, then be used for illegal downloads, then becom illegal, and then the scientific community would just have to write a new one.

This is priceless ... these people are utterly dumb.

Anyhow, you are right ... this law is unenforcable, and will soon enough be dead in the water..

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 04:28:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They argue that they only want to authorize file-sharing used for research only or sharing (in piracy) non-copyright protected stuff.

I meant that is used for research or that is not used to pirate copyright protected stuff.

I'm typing this while watching, so I make a lot of mistakes.

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 04:29:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There have been quite a number of good speeches against the Vivendi amendment, and now they are taking a break to discuss a possible compromise on it.

The minister makes out the amendment will only penalize software written "with manifestly illegal intent", but the fact is that the only way (it seems to me) you can show your intent is not manifestly illegal is to include or work with DRMs.

But it's clear the deputies are talking about a review in six months or a year whatever happens. And, like TBG, I feel that the further they go, the sillier they will look, and the less chance the law will ever have of being applied. (I hope....)

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 04:33:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The scariest part of amendment 150, is the 2nd bit.

« 2° d'inciter sciemment à l'usage d'un dispositif mentionné au 1°. »

If you encourage people to use Bit Torrent, you will now risk 3 years of jail + 300 000 euros of fines. Linux distributions via Bit Torrent will be in deep trouble.

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 04:37:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They're back in and Bloche is attacking the word "manifestly" for being ambiguous. (Bit Torrent clients, for example, are not written with manifestly illegal intent since BT was invented for other purposes than those it may now be used for).
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 04:46:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Found on the FreeBSD website:

"The FreeBSD project encourages the use of BitTorrent for distributing the release ISO images"

Bam! 3 years in jail for FreeBSD!

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 04:47:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Mme Boutin is fighting mad! Very good short speech saying that Internet users are being stigmatized, the talk from the minister doesn't disguise the fact that the amendment hasn't changed in its fundamentals, etc.

I used to hate this woman. Heh.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 04:48:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
She also said the amendment is ridiculous because inapplicable.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 04:53:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Besides, like it has been said on the framasoft forums, P2P software can be distributed using ... P2P software.
Where does it stop?
by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 05:02:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thankfully the amendment 363 has been voted, so it may screw the 150.
by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 05:07:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 05:09:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's the first time that I see Bloche (Socialist) get mad.
by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 05:11:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The minister has said he isn't backing down on the amendment 150. The socialists and UDF have asked for a public vote.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 05:02:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
OK, they've voted heavily in favour of the amendment 150 and all the sub-amendments proposed by the government. No compromise on anything at all.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 05:09:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Now they're trying to apply tariffs to open formats.
Next thing you know they'll start saying that free software will have to be commercial.

I'll be moving to Barcelona when my software is ready.

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 06:13:30 PM EST
This is fucking ridiculous. This law is dead in the water. It is unenforceable. It will lead to international court cases. It is contrary to the common market. It will be the death of healthy, innovative, French software companies like Nuxeo.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 06:31:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
French judges are going to hate this law.
by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 06:36:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Let's hope the Constitutional Council kills it.

On a positive note, might this and the CPE débâcle be the beginning of the end of the UMP? I mean. I can't imagine any intelligent conservative voting for them rather than the UDF.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 06:57:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
By the way, in the closing hours, they voted amendment 316 which allows DRMs to be circumvented for purposes of research, security, interoperability. Which kind of screws the text!

Anyhow from this day onwards, it's official, I am now a Consultant in Research, Security & Interoperability.

Let me get a screwdriver and see if I can take my DVD player apart. And let me try to copy this other DVD just to see if I can, thus satisfying my research objectives.

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Mar 15th, 2006 at 08:03:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Now you can circumvent DRMs for interoperability?

This is just too funny.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 01:30:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Does a Linux HowTo count as a research paper? The answer in the next DADVSI lawsuit.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 01:33:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, the minister was in fact pretty much bundling off his responsibility on to judges by saying that the jurisprudence couldn't fail to be clear. He was talking about the wording "manifestly illegal intention".

In other words, he was refusing to listen to criticism in its proper place (parliament), and to improve the wording of his bill, and placing the responsibility on the lawcourts that will have to judge all the cases the majors will not fail to bring -- against software that can always be shown to have other applications and not to be "manifestly" written with illegal intention.

Producing complicated laws that can't really be applied is a common failing of the French legislature. All the same, Donnedieu is a Number One Wanker.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 01:49:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Interesting series of events. C. Paul (Socialist) wants to know if any external pressures from lobbies influenced the government, and cites the example of B. Carrayon (right-wing UMP) who in a France 2 TV channel news report had mentioned that there were considerable pressures on people like him, around this law, pressures which he had even qualified as "morally reprehensible".

Now this Carrayon was one of the UMP rebels on this law, who voted against this law. In December that is. And suddenly, in March, he's totally changed and fully supports the government.

So, C. Paul cites an email written by Carrayon to a member of the Framasoft forums that I mention higher up in this diary.

Which Carrayon denies ever having written.

The mail then resurfaces in our forum with full headers. (see below)

Then Carrayon says he was in his home town when it was written (ps: this he can easily prove).

But by doing so, he doesn't realize that he's just raised the issue of identity usurpation on the internet, And since punishing piracy etc is central to this law, this is an interesting event. Also, even it if in the end it doesn't change anything for us, it's at least a "compensation proof" that even the rebels were made to bend on their knees by the government, and that the lobbies are VERY STRONG.

Here is the mail exchange content, I will not translate it (basically Carrayon says that this law is shit in it).

> Bravo Mr Carayon. Vous avez montré cette nuit combien un député
> pouvait se comporter de manière minable en votant l'amendement
> Vivendi-Universal. Vous et votre groupe avez fait tout au long
> de ces débats la démonstration de votre mépris de la démocratie.
> Je ne sais pas entre incompétence ou corruption lequel de ces termes
> convient le mieux à votre groupe, peut-être les deux, en tout cas,
> sachez que des dizaines de milliers d'internautes ont assisté à vos
> turpitudes et à cette parodie de démocratie.
> J'espère que le retour de baton sera très violent, et pour ce qui me
> concerne, je jure devant Dieu que jamais plus je ne voterai pour une
> engeance telle que la votre et celà même si se représentait le cas
> de figure de la dernière élection présidentielle. Honte à vous.
> Je ne vous salue pas.

Return-Path: <bcarayon@assemblee-nationale.fr>
Delivered-To: online.fr--------@free.fr
Received: (qmail 5929 invoked from network); 16 Mar 2006 11:17:23 -0000
Received: from smtpout.assemblee-nationale.fr (80.118.139.171)
by mrelay5-2.free.fr with SMTP; 16 Mar 2006 11:17:23 -0000
Received: from domino1.assemblee-nationale.fr ([10.255.255.91])
by smtpout.assemblee-nationale.fr with ESMTP; 16 Mar 2006 12:17:24 +0100
X-Brightmail-Right: No
X-IronPort-AV: i="4.02,197,1139180400";
d="scan'208"; a="13469383:sNHT184013664"
Content-Type: multipart/mixed; boundary="pORA.43nhM9VVr.1EqPT.Ftb8RWr"
Received: from [10.10.130.40] ([10.10.130.40])
by domino1.assemblee-nationale.fr (SMSSMTP 4.0.0.59) with SMTP id M2006031612172303686
for <lamar2@free.fr>; Thu, 16 Mar 2006 12:17:23 +0100
From: Bernard Carayon - ?iso-8859-1?q?D=E9put=E9_du_Tarn? <bcarayon@assemblee-nationale.fr>
Organization: ?iso-8859-1?q?Assembl=E9e? Nationale
To: Le Fennec <--------@free.fr>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2006 12:17:16 +0100
User-Agent: KMail/1.8.2
References: <127202215265.20060316031013@free.fr>

Bonjour Monsieur,

Je vous invite à relire les débats et notamment l'amendement qui a permis de
limiter plus que fortement la portée du détestable amendement VU. Sans
l'intervention de Richard Cazenave et de moi-même, le troisième alinéa
excluant les logiciels de partage de la mesure n'aurait pas été voté.

Nous faisons ce que nous pouvons avec une mauvaise directive à transposer et
un texte de projet de li initial détestable. Merci de regarder les apports
(intéop - voir à la fin du texte, sécurité informatique (amdt 273), etc...)

Enfin l'insulte devrait rester étrangère au débat démocratique.
Bonne jouréne
Cordialement
Bernard Carayon

by Alex in Toulouse on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 11:46:25 AM EST
Jérome can you edit my comment to get rid of that person's email internet in the middle of the headers??

I didn't notice it, this may be problematic.
(though Carrayon cannot sue the internet user for the simple reason that Carrayon says he did not write that mail).

Look for this one place where "@free.fr>;" is not preceded by "--------"

by Alex in Toulouse on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 11:51:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It will have to be deleted and reposted.

We can troll-rate the comment to hide it in the meantime, too.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 11:52:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Good idea. Let's troll rate it.
by Alex in Toulouse on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 11:55:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oops I can't troll-rate myself :))
by Alex in Toulouse on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 11:55:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, who would want to do that?

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 11:57:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It is confirmed by the way, French universities and public research labs will have to open up their intranets to representatives of Sony, Microsoft etc.

Article in French


DADVSI: les établissements publics de recherche et d'enseignements contraints d'ouvrir leur SI aux ayant-droits

En parallèle avec la très controversée licence globale, le projet de loi DADVSI vient de statuer sur un vide juridique concernant l'utilisation des livres, images, musique et autres supports en vue de l'éducation des élèves français. Le ministère de la culture vient donc de passer des accords « exception recherche et éducation » avec le ministère de l'éducation et les sociétés d'ayants droits. Par ce texte il contraint les établissements à ouvrir leur SI aux représentants des ayants droit à savoir des sociétés privées « afin de permettre l'identification des ?uvres visées par l'accord, un identifiant et un code d'accès à l'intranet ou extranet sont communiqués par l'établissement aux représentants des ayants droit. » Plus loin, l'article 10 spécifie les droits de ces agents : « Les agents assermentés de chaque représentant des ayants droit auront la faculté d'accéder aux réseaux informatiques des établissements afin de procéder à toutes vérifications nécessaires. ». Ces dispositions prisent sans aucune concertation posent de nombreux problèmes de sécurité et de confidentialité. Si les DSI n'ont pas encore fait entendre leur voix, le corps enseignant dénonce ce contrat avec les ayants droits et rejette en bloc les accords passés qui limitent et contrôlent leurs pratiques pédagogiques. Que diront-ils quand ils comprendront qu'ils ne peuvent même plus écrire sur leur réseau informatique en toute confidentialité ?

by Alex in Toulouse on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:10:21 PM EST
Any calls for civil disobedience?

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:25:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In the Education world yes, it's been launched (you can sign the petition here ("signer l'appel" on the right). You can see the civil disobedience news when you scroll down on the first page to March 9th.

http://www.politechnicart.net/exception/php/index.php

by Alex in Toulouse on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:28:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Repeating comment here for clarity purposes (previously made in Week-End Open Thread)

Question:

"Name two members of the French entertainment industry who are jubilating at the prospects opened up by the new DADVSI law (see: Internet Freedoms in France), to the point of being obscene."

Answer:

One of them is Costa-Gavras, who said "of course we can control the internet, they do it in Tunisia and China, but here we would be doing it for the right reasons"
http://www.lcpan.fr/droit_auteur.asp?tc=000629#000629
(it's a video ... his comment starts shortly after the 20th minute)

The other is Kyo, who said "of course we can control the internet, they do it in China"
http://www.silicon.fr/articles/14186/Sarkozy-veut-chasser-les-logiciels-de-P2P-Au-karcher.html

by Alex in Toulouse on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:17:35 PM EST
Bastards! Taking their moral guidance from China.

The French internat will go underground, you'll see.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:24:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think your prediction will indeed come true.
If this law doesn't shoot itself in the foot, that is.

I mean amendment 150 and 267 are so fucked up that just about every internet software can now be deemed illegal.

This has prompted me to suggest on the framasoft forums that we all give money to the independent artist organisations like SPEDIDAM or ADAMI (who were in favour of the "global licence" option) ... so that they can pay the best lawyers in France, and start attacking MSN Search, Google (for providing links to illegal stuff and thus behaving as P2P software) and Vivendi Universal (for using BitTorrent to release udpates for its most popular online game), as soon as this law is in place. We have to be the first to attack, it's our best defence. And it will be so nice to see this law backfire on the bastards who promoted it.

by Alex in Toulouse on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:31:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
These idiots do't understand that it's geeks who work in the guts of the corporate internet and keep it running.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:33:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One of those geeks thanks you very much for this acknowledgement :-)
by slaboymni on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:35:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There is a thread on the framasoft forums running allegories on the type of approach that the "blame the software not its worst users" part of this law motivates.

Indeed, by either declaring "illegal" any software that is "manifestly used" to exchange copyright-protected stuff, or by asking the editors of such a software to include DRMs to avoid this type of use, this law tries to wag the dog.

Some of these analogies here:

Many people die in hospitals. It is therefore necessary to implement DRMs at the entrances of hospitals to prevent people who would die inside from entering.

Beards and moustaches can be problematic for face identification software, thus allowing terrorists to get away with anything! It is thus necessary that any person with "manifest" facial pilosity get a barcode stuck on the forehead.

Plyers can cut through barb-wire. Plyers must therefore have plastic gags added to their tips to prevent them from cutting.

by Alex in Toulouse on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:46:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
2 members of France's lower house of parliament (Assemblée Nationale), the députés Carrayon and Cazenave, both UMP rebels on the DADVSI law, will be present for a live discussion on the FramaSoft forums ("Libertés Numériques" area), Tuesday 28th of March (after-tomorrow), from 18h30 to 20h00.

A good opportunity for anyone who wants to talk to them live (in French) on issues concerning the DADVSI law, as anyone registered can post on the forum (ie. no moderating before posting ... only after to filter out racist, pedophile and any other filthy comments).

FramaSoft is once again bringing direct democracy to France, kudos to them!

by Alex in Toulouse on Sun Mar 26th, 2006 at 04:44:33 PM EST


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