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Immigration to Europe: A Non-EU migrant's perspective

by Jeffersonian Democrat Fri May 29th, 2009 at 04:41:49 PM EST

Last week, I wrote a diary that was one part desperation, two parts dark snark, and four parts Schloss Hefeweizen.  Needless to say, it didn't go over very well but it was about my despair about turning 43 on the 23rd and the French Foreign Legion's big "Non".

So what does age, the Legion, and immigration have to do with one another?  Not really a lot unless you are trying to find ways to contribute to a society you really wish to live in.

I've loved Europe since I was around eight-years-old.  It has always been a dream to live here.  I'm really nerdy when it comes to visiting castles and museums and reading Sagas and Arthurian Legends, that hasn't changed since I was 8.  My military experience provided me with the chance to experience exotic places from the Sinai to Honduras to Panama and elsewhere.  But only once did I come here for Reforger '85 in January 1985.  I've yet to experience another Winter here that cold.


I graduated University of Michigan in Russian and Eastern European Studies in 1996 after three semesters abroad in Moscow where I met my ex wife and current good friend.  I returned to active military as a Naval officer but eventually returned to graduate school in Germanic Languages and Literature at University of Virginia and received my MA in January 2005.

In the fall of 2004 I came over to Germany as a guest lecturer and loved this place so much I decided to stay.  I was also involved with a nice German woman and we were about to be married but everything fell apart in September and I think it has a lot to do with the miscarriage.

But I loved the more relaxed European lifestyle.  I wanted to live in the places I studied and see everything.

Here in Germany "Intergration" is a very big thing for immigrants.  But I cannot tell you how many times Germans have told me that I know more about their culture and literature than they do themselves.  My German is not perfect, especially in writing, but I speak fluidly and everyone understands me regardless of grammar mistakes.  I often brag how my family came to the US from the Principality of Hannover in 1870 according to Ellis Island documents and how their family Bible from 1725 traces us back to Jacob Luther, the brother of the Reformator.

But the obstacles of a Non-EU resident has hit me hard.

I have recently found out that the Auslandsamt made an initial mistake with my visa.  November is coming up when I will have 5 years residency.  However, despite allowed to work as a "Dozent", they listed me under paragraph 16, which is a student visa.

They admitted I should have been under paragraph 18 which allows you to work.  But, and here is the kick in the balls, now that I am again a PhD student, they can't change it.  The law states that under a student visa, the time of residency counts only as half.  The new EU visa is also not applicable because I am listed as a "student" rather than a "worker".

I feel as though I just wasted five years chasing a dream and living in poverty to accomplish that dream.  I mean, my only income is a veteran's pension and we all know how the dollar is doing.  I can so far not find employment where I am allowed to work and cannot work generally because of the law.

Last week I considered what I knew how to do, and therefore the Legion seemed an option that would give me the EU citizenship at the end of another five years.

Here's the thing that kills me, too.  I understand why it is so hard, I heard the same arguments in the US about the immigrants coming and stealing our jobs.  In Dortmund, I lived on a park.  Every morning there were people who looked like Turks or Middle Easterners wearing florescent uniforms and picking up trash.  That same park had a Stehcafe/kiosk where at the same time people who looked like typical Germans were drinking beer.

There seemed to be a disconnect there.  It seemed to me that like the US, immigrants will do whatever they have to to work and contribute to society in the hopes that their children will have more chances.  Immigration brings a richness of diversity to the culture.  We can look at food and festivals as anecdotal evidence.

I am an immigrant.  I want to work.  I do not want to live in poverty nor live on the dole.  I want to pay my taxes, I want to contribute to society.  I also feel that it is not only my responsibility to understand the political process but also my duty (that's my Americanism coming through), therefore I've become more active in Die Linke here in Jena and will probably join the SDS as well.

I view the xenophobia as ancient entrenched tribalism.  My own education addresses this.  It really did not get organized until the aristocracy recruited the Romantics against Bonapartism in the early 1800s with this new idea of "Pan-Germanism".  Thankfully, most of it died in the rubble of Berlin in 1945.  But it still exists in subtle forms, especially in immigration law.

Ironically, I can and have educated Germans on Goethe and Schiller but I would probably have an easier time if I were an IT specialist, scientist, or engineer.  Special visas for those folks.  But there is no need for philosophers or philologists.  Europe certainly has a problem with ageism as well.  It's protected as discrimination in the US but not here.  It is certainly not a given that I will even find a job after my defense even in academia.

This whole diary is anecdotal.  It's just my perspective and I am trying to live out my own personal dream.  These concerns are really affecting my ability to study and write without stress; I am writing my dissertation as well as studying Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse.

It's a shame, I actually want to intergrate and participate.  I am not the brightest, many others even here are much more brighter than I.  But I am not dumb either and I would think that I would be the ideal immigrant for a society that is losing its best and brightest to globalization.

All is not so dire, however.  I may be teaching next semester and that will change my visa status.  I've applied with the Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung and will apply with the Thüringen Stipend fund next month that I qualify for.  But in the meantime, I have an appointment with the Evangelische Studentengemeinde, a charity affiliated with the church, for help next week.

And that is a another kick in the balls.  I am fully able to work and pay taxes, yet this is the first time that I have to go groveling to a charity.

Display:
Good luck. I wish I could give you advice, but I'm still in the stage of wanting to move to Europe but with no idea how.

And there's no option of appealing to higher-ups (can you contact TV/local paper for a little media pressure?), trying to get credit for the years you lived there?

by lychee on Fri May 29th, 2009 at 05:11:31 PM EST
I will meet with the university's student legal help next week about getting the credit.

But I am not sure if they can help.

Despite the horror stories of German bureaucracy, the one thing they are are consistent on is that if you have the paperwork, they abide by it, and you can count on it.

Unfortunately, my paperwork is not in my favor on this because I didn't catch the mistake.

My only hope is the "as a foreigner, how would I know" defense, which is pretty weak in a court of law.

"Schiller sprach zu Goethe, Steck in dem Arsch die Fl÷te! Goethe sagte zu Schiller, Mein Arsch ist kein Triller!"

by Jeffersonian Democrat (rzg6f@virginia.edu) on Fri May 29th, 2009 at 05:58:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think you've got a lot to be sore about, JD. You're right about the attitude to immigrants (and this is only better for EU citizens from the older countries of the Union), and also the ageism (specially notable in France). And arbitrary administrative mistakes that screw things up (I remember one, in 1985 precisely - January that year was absolutely the damn coldest time I've known - that put off for several years the moment when I'll be able to claim a little minimum retirement pension; no going back on it, nothing I can do). I'm sorry this is happening to you.

I hope the possible teaching job works out. It sounds like the kind of help you need.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri May 29th, 2009 at 05:12:33 PM EST
well, what can you do?

I have a lot of people who would argue for me that I would make a good addition to German/European society but the law is the law.

I hope the teaching works out too (they're in the planning phases for next semester now at both Erfurt and Jena), that's really all I want to do with my life.  I am not interested in getting rich or in power, the teaching gives so much more satisfaction when your students actually grasp what you are teaching.

But dealing with the bureaucracy, I really did think it was simpler just to become a Legionaire and wear the Kepi Blanc.

"Schiller sprach zu Goethe, Steck in dem Arsch die Fl÷te! Goethe sagte zu Schiller, Mein Arsch ist kein Triller!"

by Jeffersonian Democrat (rzg6f@virginia.edu) on Fri May 29th, 2009 at 06:07:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]

the teaching gives so much more satisfaction when your students actually grasp what you are teaching.

How very true...! Though I do find a general weakness in basic culture, not allowing them to make the links between fields (as would say Edgar Morin)... Meaning that we must re-invent new ways or pursue in the hyper-selective way of keeping only those who have already a proper background... Thus defeating the purpose of teaching!

"What can I do, What can I write, Against the fall of Night". A.E. Housman

by margouillat (hemidactylus(dot)frenatus(at)wanadoo(dot)fr) on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 05:54:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
the demonization of immigrants has been one of the ugliest trends in politics over the past 20 years in Europe. I'm sure it's happened before, but it's definitely gone worse over this period.

I'm sorry to read your bad experience and hope it turns out well.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 05:39:38 AM EST
is actually quite racist, in fact.

Here I am, a white educated (specifically in the field of the native culture) American of German and Polish decent, third generation in fact, and I am having these bureaucratic problems.

I imagine an immigrant from Pakistan or Kenya has it way worse than I do.

That was really my read-between-the-lines point here.  I am already integrated and that is the main argument used against immigrants.  It doesn't logically hold up.  Therefore I believe it falls out of logic to irrational xenophobia and blatant racism.

I am experiencing the barriers of xenophobic policy.  It was shocking to me how the Auslandsamt openly stated that since I am an educated American that I was treated differently.

I certainly do not believe that I should have special consideration for that, but rather that immigration should be more accessible for all.

In the US as well, for that matter.

"Schiller sprach zu Goethe, Steck in dem Arsch die Fl÷te! Goethe sagte zu Schiller, Mein Arsch ist kein Triller!"

by Jeffersonian Democrat (rzg6f@virginia.edu) on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 06:49:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I imagine an immigrant from Pakistan or Kenya has it way worse than I do.

I can only imagine...
Looks like it's going to be rough for immigrants EVERYWHERE.
Few days ago here on TV they told us how immigrants from India became target of vicious attacks lately here in Australia.

Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind...Albert Einstein
by vbo on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 09:07:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
... Sweden or the Netherlands. Once you are legally a permanent resident, you are free to move to and live in any other EU country, if you can find work there. And if the bureaucrats give you any shit about it, you sue. There's an absolutely ironclad precedent from the European Court.

Precisely what happens if you lose your job in the new country of residence without being a full citizen yet isn't quite clear to me. But as long as you're a legal permanent resident (of one of the "old" EU countries - the "new" ones have special rules...), and you have a job, you should be home free.

(Disclaimer: IANAL and this is not legal advice. Contact your local immigration NGO - they know the rules.)

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 06:13:30 AM EST
The problem so far is that it is legal but not permanent residence.  The student status affects that.  And reading on the new EU visa that gives freedom of mobility specifically excludes those in student status.

That's my problem, I got locked into student status.

I was actually under the impression that the Netherlands and EU Scandanavian countries were actually more difficult to immigrate to.  I had considered Iceland until the meltdown as well as the Czech Republic as I believe the cost of living is lower.  But until I can secure the permanent part of the residency, I don't believe I have the freedom of mobility and that I have to start over with the required residency time.

"Schiller sprach zu Goethe, Steck in dem Arsch die Fl÷te! Goethe sagte zu Schiller, Mein Arsch ist kein Triller!"

by Jeffersonian Democrat (rzg6f@virginia.edu) on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 06:39:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Scandinavia is not a unified political entity on the subject of immigration. Sweden is more or less reasonable, but Denmark has gone completely batshit over the last ten years or so.

I have a friend who wanted to bring his American wife into the Union - he went first to Malmö (because he wanted to finish his studies in Copenhagen), then to the Netherlands.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 09:07:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, I have heard that Scandinavia is much more helpful... at least have been to Bosnian refugees. All tho they may just got that order from USA (like Australia)...

Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind...Albert Einstein
by vbo on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 09:11:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
As Jake said, Scandinavia is not a political unit and has quite different policies. There are lots of ex-yugoslavic (mainly from Bosnia) refugees in Sweden. Also notable are the quite large populstion of iraqi refugees.

Sweden has a legacy of immigration since those post-wwII days when swedish industries (standing undamaged and booming from Marshall-help induced orders) sponsored workers (finnish, yugoslavian and italian comes to mind) to move to Sweden and even though policies has gotten quite thighter since the early 1990-ies, it did so from a completedly other level then say Finland (which does only rarely grant asylum to anyone).

I doubt this will help JD, but here is the link to the swedish migration boards pages in english.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 04:08:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well you are in the same position like millions of (wanting) to be immigrants. I can hear you...because I am an immigrant too. For some (unknown) reason I always wanted to live in foreign country. When I was 18 I tried UK (having some relatives there and being able to speak sort of English language).Then I had to go back to Serbia cause my Mum became terminally ill and died soon. I had to take care of my younger brother so I stayed...then got married...and I abounded my dream.
But the destiny knew it better.
At the time when we decided to leave Serbia in 1993 (loosing any hope that the hell will somehow go away) we obviously would rather want to stay in Europe (closer to home) but...Europe wouldn't take us. We were not refugees (being from Serbia) so we couldn't go that path. We had to go trough point system. Even those from Bosnia had a rough path to EU as I understood (except in Scandinavia).Europe was closed for us Serbs from Serbia. So we had to look where it was "open". For educated Serbs from Serbia at the time there was two ways: Canada and New Zealand. Especially cause they were not that strict about language requirements.
Yes, if they NEED you they are not that strict. And to Canada and New Zealand at the time immigrated many highly educated and well experienced Serbs with their families...engineers, doctors, pilots...As I understand most of them found pretty good jobs in their field and are doing well. Because they were needed they had been given chance to work. There was an immigration officer in New Zealand who we managed to know personally later. He told us that they did not expect much of us but they are interested in our children. All though many of those Serbian families ended up here in Australia for better jobs, later.
But Europe is another story. Do not know much but looks like even those well educated Poles (now in EU) did not have same chance in UK...or am I wrong?
I do not want to be rough, but man it looks like you screwed your life big time. Your 43, leave your dreams in EU and look for the place where you can have decent life for the start (it's not easy though in the middle of this crises).... Everything else will follow...
There was a good saying in the movie "Curios case of Benjamin Button" that goes something like this: "My child I hope you'll do good in your life but even more I hope that if you stray away from good you'll have courage to get back and start it all over again" or something like that...That's what I pray for my children ...
Do not wait for the charity to save you. Or go to extremes like French Legionary.  It's not that we all live where we would like to live...Sometimes it's bad luck that follow us (all though this shouldn't be excuse) but most of the time it's about our choices ...


Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind...Albert Einstein
by vbo on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 08:48:53 AM EST
First of all, as one individual American, let me apologize for what we did as a country to Serbia.

As I stated, I was married to a Russian for eight years.  She was extremely critical of Serbians crying "Slavic Brotherhood" after years of defying the Soviet Union but there was still an understanding of average Serbs and their point of view.  We, the US, absoloutely ignored that.

She was also critical of the Polish side of my family calling Poles the "prostitutes of Europe".  But she was half Tartar and half Russian, so what do you expect?

Unfortunately, I no longer have home or family back in the US.  What I have is here in Europe.  If I went back, I would be there with a suitcase at the airport and then what?  On the street I imagine.

I guess if my dreams fail here in the EU, I could probably look toward Costa Rica, at least the have great surfing.

"Schiller sprach zu Goethe, Steck in dem Arsch die Fl÷te! Goethe sagte zu Schiller, Mein Arsch ist kein Triller!"

by Jeffersonian Democrat (rzg6f@virginia.edu) on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 09:17:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"Unfortunately, I no longer have home or family back in the US.  What I have is here in Europe."

:) Unfortunately, or fortunately. I think you should just focus on that and on the consequences of it, and things will begin falling into place. Don't give up hope.

Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last! (Martin Luther King)

by ValentinD (walentijn arobase free spot franša) on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 09:44:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Why don't you try Australia? You can get permanent residency up to 45 years of age. English is obviously not a problem for you. And I guess they may not have that many people that can teach here (especially languages).All my friends that were teaching found job here.
And Australia is great country for living and a very nice one.It's not perfect ...but hey there is no paradise on Earth.

Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind...Albert Einstein
by vbo on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 09:49:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
and I would be able to take up surfing again, just the great whites put a damper on it.

I'll google the Aussie embassy, I almost made the point system for New Zealand a couple of years ago due to education, only a couple of points short for that year.

But the surfing is better in Australia (though I should probably sell my x-country skies)

"Schiller sprach zu Goethe, Steck in dem Arsch die Fl÷te! Goethe sagte zu Schiller, Mein Arsch ist kein Triller!"

by Jeffersonian Democrat (rzg6f@virginia.edu) on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 10:02:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Even if you manage to pass point system for New Zealand you can freely come to live in Australia after becoming citizen.Have a closer look to both countries.And once you have permanent residence you are practically equal to citizens (at least after 2 years I think).In New Zealand you can even vote (which I am not so enthusiastic about any more) but here in Australia you need to be citizen to vote.
Actually when I look at it ( on the surface) Europe has/had much more of the security (pensions, health , work ) then those overseas countries but on the other hand from what I have heard they do not treat immigrants nowhere near equally to other citizens like those countries  overseas).  
As for surf the ocean is at least pretty worm here ( as opposed to New Zealand).

Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind...Albert Einstein
by vbo on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 10:21:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Jeffersonian Democrat:
I could probably look toward Costa Rica, at least the have great surfing.

lol, stop reading my mind...

if we all end up on portu-peas level, that's a hell of a free asset few europeans even have tried.

i'll see ya out there in the surf

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Jun 1st, 2009 at 07:42:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In no particular order, I will begin by the issue of the visa. You have to realize that european universities accept students from all over the world. This is why visa students come with restrictions and should be avoided as much as possible. Working visas are the only thing that matters from a legal immigration viewpoint.

Second, you also have to realize that european universities produce far more graduates on humanist sciences such as languages, philosophy, psychology, history and so on, than the job market can take. At the same time the situation is almost at the opposite about anything around engineering. One could argue that Europeans become a people of epicurean philosophers with no one to repair the electrical installation :)

Third, while your situation is not a matter of integration, you must also realize that that problem is posed when immigrants are already in. The wave of xenophoby you might feel in Europe is mainly related to three aspects:
illegal immigration (mainly from northern Africa into Italy, Spain, or Greece; also from Asia into the UK or Scandinavia);
work immigration concerning the latest EU members from the Eastern Europe;
and immigrants already in possession of their permanent residence or even citizenship, and not being integrated (for various reasons, imputable to both sides); this is particularly feeding xenophobic feelings: locals have a hard time calling this people "French" or "German"; they have a hard time describing themselves as such anyway.

The fact that you're so wonderfully integrated matters a lot, but not when there are legal problems. Bureaucracy always swears by the law, even if your obvious integration (and your white skin, because prejudices are a human quality) puts them in a friendly disposition.
I can assure you that an indian or algerian in possession of all required documents is treated absolutely professionally, and at least in France he'll have a good chance of talking to a clerk of his own race, since they started to staff immigration offices with people of foreign origins. He won't have a problem with xenophobic feelings, let alone policies; that may happen afterwards, if he doesn't integrate successfully.

Finally, all western countries protect 1) their job market and 2) their social security systems. It's a problem of money, and nothing else. If they don't need astronauts, they won't give them visa, period. There is no way to go beyond this. They welcome doctors, nurses, or engineers, because these are the profiles in low supply. Immigration is easier in NZ, Australia or Canada because those have always been immigration countries and have the required infrastructure as well as the necessary culture, but even them sort out candidates by their work field.
In short, the best way for you is indeed to find work as a teacher and then get a proper work visa. This is where your integration will help. Then you'll be able to find out if and how you can profit from the years you already spent there as a teacher, in view of permanent residence.

Hoping this will help,

Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last! (Martin Luther King)

by ValentinD (walentijn arobase free spot franša) on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 10:17:04 AM EST
In short, the best way for you is indeed to find work as a teacher and then get a proper work visa.  

Sometimes it's like this : One can't work on a student visa ( or can only work some student's jobs, like bar tender etc. and only certain amount of hours.
And to get working visa one needs job.Being already in the country on student visa it looks like it's not possible to get out of this circle...
I don't know what is the case here...


Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind...Albert Einstein
by vbo on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 10:31:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It only appears like a vicious circle. In practice, student visas (or marriages) bring the person in, then the person finds work, real work, then tries to persuade the administration that she doesn't "take the place" of a local who lives on social help, ie, there was no one else available for the job then and there. Once this is done (accompanying paperwork included), employee visa is at hand.

Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last! (Martin Luther King)
by ValentinD (walentijn arobase free spot franša) on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 10:51:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
then tries to persuade the administration that she doesn't "take the place" of a local who lives on social help, ie, there was no one else available for the job then and there.
-------
This could be a barrier.
All tho I can understand that jobs need to be secured for people already on welfare first...

Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind...Albert Einstein
by vbo on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 08:28:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I guess my gripe is that I came and believed I was here as a worker, a guest lecturer, rather than a student.  I have paid into the social security system from my limited work here.

Furthermore, I do not feel bad of having to draw on, in the future, the social security system after I learned that by treaty, the contributions I made every paycheck in the US are counted here.  Just as if a European immigrated to the US and their SS contributions would count with the US Social Security system by treaty.

This is reassuring:
"I can assure you that an indian or algerian in possession of all required documents is treated absolutely professionally"

On a grander scale than just my situation.

BTW, outside the Legion, thought of becoming a priest to teach as well.  My faith isn't that strong but have been celibate for over a year.

"Schiller sprach zu Goethe, Steck in dem Arsch die Fl÷te! Goethe sagte zu Schiller, Mein Arsch ist kein Triller!"

by Jeffersonian Democrat (rzg6f@virginia.edu) on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 11:00:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]

BTW, outside the Legion, thought of becoming a priest to teach as well.  My faith isn't that strong but have been celibate for over a year.  

Now if you are exploring possibilities...
I've got an e-mail this morning that is telling about German welfare system lately that is saying something like this:

NEW GERMAN PACKAGE OF SOCIAL REFORMS DRASTICALLY TREAT PEOPLE WHO REFUSE JOB THAT IS OFFERED TO THEM

Women that refused job of the prostitute is in danger to lose her welfare payment

Because prostitution in Germany is legalized , and brothel owners are paying tax and health insurance for their employees , prostitution has become job as any other and is listed in the data base for people that are looking for a job.
BERLIN-If you are unemployed women and you live in Germany, then you have to take ANY job offered to you by employment agency.If you refuse job you will lose your welfare payment.
Just this could happen to 25 years old unemployed waitress from Berlin that refused job of the prostitute!
Actually from 1 January , when this package of social reforms named Hartz IV,  started to be applied those people who refuse job will be taken of the list for welfare payments.
Having in mind that prostitution has been legalized two years ago (here in Australia too by the way - vbo) and owners of the brothels are paying tax and health insurance for their employees , prostitution is a job like any other and is listed in data base for those looking for a job -" Sunday Telegraph" is writhing and many other media also are talking about it.
Waitress, that is actually IT professional, have listed in her CV that she is willing to work in a bar because she had some experience as waitress working in a cafe some time ago(probably woman disparate to find any job - vbo).
Recently she received a latter from employment agency telling her that one "employer" is interested for her so she could call him.When she called his number she realised that she is talking to brothel owner.  
   According to reforms that are legislation now , every woman under 55 years of age, and is without job for more then one year, can be forced to accept any job offered, including one in sex industry or will lose social beneffits.
   German government contemplated possibility to exclude job at the brothel for moral reasons but they abounded the idea beacuse it will be hard to distinguish brothels from bars.
   According to this, employment agencies must treat equally those who are looking for prostitutes as those who are looking for waitresses or nurses.
When this waitress decided to sue this employment agency she she found out that they worked in accordance to law.If the agency decided not to take person off the welfare than they can be sued by employer.
  "There is not one paragraph in the law that wood counteract women to be "recruited" for work in sex industry" said Merchthild Garweg , lawyer from Hamburg specialized in this kind of cases and added: "New rules state that work in a sex industry is not immoral any more and job as it is can't be refused without losing social welfare payment".

Now please tell me this is a big JOKE !!!

Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind...Albert Einstein

by vbo on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 09:58:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
  1. Maybe you should try to insist on the Auslandsamt's (not your!) initial mistake. You had no doubt everything was fine with your visa and now - this?!

  2. I wouldn't associate your experience with "xenophobia". You have the same thing everywhere. The land isn't everyone's everywhere.

3)I am German but have been away for many years; so my nationality is of little help. I have this idea about German regional mentalities, though, that says you may have less problems with the administration in the old Lander - in Hamburg, Frankfurt or Munich, especially as an American academic. Maybe I'm mistaken, and maybe it wouldn't be an option for you to move if you have your ties in Jena and some job prospects already.
 
by Lily (put - lilyalmond - here <a> yahaah.france) on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 11:32:28 AM EST
It's just as bad in the US. There was a woman in Montreal whose fiancee lived in Maryland. Took her two years to get a visa to move to MD and get married.

It was an awfully depressing time for them both, but they're doing very well.

Two years though. Senators and congressmen weren't able to help against the heavy hand of Chertoff and the DHS.

"It Can't Be Just About Us"
--Frank Schnittger, ETian Extraordinaire

by papicek (papi_cek_at_hotmail_dot_com) on Mon Jun 1st, 2009 at 07:23:45 AM EST


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