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LQD: Harper Govt purveys Suncor PR

by DeAnander Thu Oct 14th, 2010 at 04:29:01 AM EST

I've been too busy with real-world tasks (and pleasures) for the last few months to do much blogging, but winter is i-cumin in and sometimes the outrage-o-meter pegs so hard that only blogging will relieve one's feelings...

I'll just let Richard Littlemore and Stephen Leahy tell the story:

The Conservative government of Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper has launched a huge Suncor-sponsored campaign to reframe climate change as a good thing for Canada's economy. [RL]

The first comprehensive look at the expected impacts of climate change on Canada offers an embarrassing and misleading "don't worry, be happy" vision, citing more golf days and better access to northern deposits of oil and gas courtesy of global warming, critics say. [SL]

frontpaged by afew


RL goes on to report -- one senses that perhaps  intervals of head-banging interrupted his typing -- that

In a joint project between the government's National Roundtable on the Environment and the Economy and the (in this case compromised) Royal Canadian Geographic Society, the Conservatives have introduced "Climate Prosperity," on the face of it, a benign educational program that "lays out the physical effects of climate hange on Canada."

But (points for transparency), the government also admits the thrust of the campaign on its tar-sands-funded  website:

"While the phrase ‘climate change’ is familiar to many — and a scientifically accepted phenomenon —  the phrase ‘climate prosperity’ is newer. It is a phrase the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy wants Canadians to embrace."

Canada, which has been actively blocking international efforts to negotiate an extension or useful replacement for the Kyoto Protocol that would actually begin to deal with the threats of global warming, has a different plan. As NRTEE President and CEO David McLaughlin explains it: “Adapt and prosper will be increasingly central to Canadian governments, communities, and businesses as these effects become more and more evident.”

It is, perhaps, to the Conservatives' good fortune that they have allies in Canada's newly remade national newspaper, the Toronto Globe and Mail. For more than a week, the Globe has been rolling out a series of stories celebrating all the great benefits that will accrue to Canada in a climate changing world.

 [follow his links for further doses of flabbergastification]

The Monty Pythonesque report is full of error, per reputable climate scientists [SL:]

Among the serious scientific errors in the "Degrees of Change" chart is a statement that the Arctic summer sea ice will decline by 50 percent around 2070. This September, the ice declined nearly 30 percent. With the rate of decline about 12 percent per decade and accelerating virtually every year, sea ice experts estimate there will be 100 percent loss of summer ice within the next decade or two.

"That 50 percent by 2070 is completely wrong. I don't know where they are getting that figure from," said Andrew Weaver, a leading climatologist at Canada's University of British Columbia.

Informed by IPS that Weaver's 2007 work with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is cited as the source, Weaver responded: "I was lead author of the sea ice section. We never said anything like that in our report."

Weaver said summer sea ice wasn't expected to survive the end of century even using the now outdated data that greatly underestimated the rate of sea ice loss.

Not surprising perhaps, when the official policy is that government-funded scientists should sit down and shut up when the grownups are talking:


A blanket "gag order" imposed by the Stephen Harper government in 2005 has become ever more restrictive. Now cabinet ministers must give their approval before a scientist can comment on anything, including their own research published in a public journal.

"It's terrible, unbelievable really, that this government silences its scientists," said John Stone of Ottawa's Carleton University and a prominent member of the IPCC. Stone is also listed as a final reviewer of the chart.

[...]

"This project has the fingerprints of the fossil fuel industry all over it," said Harvey.

In fact, the report and chart was sponsored by Suncor Energy, Canada's largest oil company, a major operator in extracting oil from Alberta's tar sands and that markets gasoline as Petro-Canada. Suncor has been fined several times for pollution violations at its tar sands operations, even under Canada's oil-friendly governments.

[RL:]

If you pick your way through its [the NTREE's] membership, through the collection of politicians and business people, you will, perhaps, not be surprised by the direction of the spin. The Round Table lacks any representation from science and, as environmentalists, must settle for the CEO of a biodiesel company, and the executive director of Environment Probe, "a public interest organization that promotes property rights and market mechanisms to protect the environment," (appearing like a well-funded, green-cloaked business lobby to fight government regulation).

In defence of some of the actual material, if you look past what spin doctors like Ibbitson promote as the exciting bits - eg., an expansion in the Canadian cruise-ship industry and easier access to northern oil and gas - much of the rest of the material appears to be accurate, scientifically sound - and horrifying.

But let's not concentrate on the negative, shall we. Let's turn away from the rest of the disenfranchised world and embrace Climate Prosperity.

Finally it seems the fossil industries and their captive politicians have been pushed past denial and into full-on, raving delusional psychosis.  The amorality of their position is barely veiled, it's out in the open and in print:  climate destabilisation is a Good Thing(TM) folks, because our country will come out ahead (hey, better golfing weather!) -- no matter how many other billions of lesser people may suffer or die.  The venality of their position isn't veiled at all:  the government's role as a talking head for fossil industry giant Suncor is announced with pride, not even the most cursory attempt at concealment.

I cannot help but be reminded of the final scene in Life of Brian... but with updated lyrics:  "Always look on the bright si-ide of mass extinction..."

Meanwhile, Canada looks like a nation of imbeciles to the rest of the thinking world.  Holy cow, it's embarrassing.  It should be embarrassing.  I hope the voters are embarrassed.  I hope the residents of Hagensborg BC, recently hammered by a record-breaking flood, remember that their destroyed homes and businesses are really "prosperity" as defined by Harper and his oil-company cronies.

Pitchforks and torches are too good for 'em.

Display:

The venality of their position isn't veiled at all:  the government's role as a talking head for fossil industry giant Suncor is announced with pride, not even the most cursory attempt at concealment.

and these guys consider Earth First! extreme.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 14th, 2010 at 05:36:35 AM EST
But with talk like this, you now have the answer to a modified statement/question of yours from another thread (something to the effect of); How will Geitner/Obama/the US nation react to the next Dust Bowl.

Destination, Canadian Border!

Never underestimate their intelligence, always underestimate their knowledge.

Frank Delaney ~ Ireland

by siegestate (siegestate or beyondwarispeace.com) on Thu Oct 14th, 2010 at 06:49:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks for the diary, De. I reckon we will soon see the same kind of propaganda from the Russian government.

"Ce qui vient au monde pour ne rien troubler ne mérite ni égards ni patience." René Char
by Melanchthon on Thu Oct 14th, 2010 at 07:11:54 AM EST
That would depend on how much confidence Medvejev and Putin have in their ability to control Gazprom. If they view the oil and gas extraction business as part of their turf, they're likely to defend it. If they view it as a separate patronage network, they might not be so willing to throw political capital after defending it.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 12:48:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
the tundra belt (Russia and Canada) would do well to reflect on this year's Russian grain harvest.

For a start, it's a question of Massive Climate Disruption, with ever more frequent extreme weather events, more than simple "global warming". Not conducive to long-term agricultural planning. The optimal growing zone will shift northwards, statistically speaking... but a new stable climate regime is probably at least centuries away.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 04:31:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
the tundra belt (Russia and Canada) would do well to reflect on this year's Russian grain harvest.

And on forest die-offs apparently related to warmer climates making climax species vulnerable to parasitic beetles, etc. The timber industry cannot be too pleased with that development.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 12:37:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Given the timespans involved in many timber species, rapid change is a really bad scenario for timber industries. Pines are in Sweden harvested after 90-150 years while spruce is harvested after 70-150 years, and together they constitute more then 80% of Sweden's forests.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se
by A swedish kind of death on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 05:01:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Timber industry here in the NW has been in "rapid liquidation" mode since the housing boom of the 80s.  Rapid change is what they are inflicting, not what they are worried about.  The pace and brutality of clearcutting has intensified markedly since the 70's (and it was bad enough then).  Their replanting strategies are slightly less stupid than they were 30 years ago (less monoculturist and more location-appropriate), but they still bend the (inadequate) regs to the breaking point.  I've personally seen logging to the very bank of rivers and streams (no setback as required by law), and I've personally heard rock shrapnel splashing into the water from illegal road blasting.  Ain't no law enforcement out there in the boonies.

What do I mean by "inflicting" rapid change?

For example the First Nations band that used to live up Knight Inlet was flooded out this Fall for the first time in yonks.  

Why such a violent flood, unlike a normal Fall?  Well doh, the timber companies (aided and abetted by the Crown) have denuded the valley floor and mountain slopes of trees -- which means the trees are no longer absorbing and respiring water and anchoring soil, which means that in the new, intensified rainfalls we're experiencing (thanks to climate destabilisation which is also intensified by cutting down all those trees) we get violent flooding.

There are even rumours that the government may not "allow" the band to return to their ancestral home (where they've lived for merely, oh, 10,000 years or so quite successfully), as it may no longer "be safe" for them to live on what is now a flood plain.

Did the band get any of the profits from the clearcutting?

Are you kidding?

As to how much carbon was released by the extensive forest fires this summer in inland BC -- fires which grow more violent each year as the standing deadwood of bug-kill pine expands -- no one afaik has hazarded a guess.

There is absolutely no plan to let the forest regenerate;  the timber industry in BC is busily redefining itself as being in the "fibre" business (pulpwood not real timber) and is busily "harvesting" pencil-thin trees at 20 years and younger.  This is trash wood, good for nothing but OSB and kraft paper:  it goes to chip mills (often offshore, raw logs bundled and shipped off to China or wherever).

I know of a few -- two?  three? -- family-owned woodlots that are genuinely, sustainably operated.  One famous one near Nanaimo now has more timber standing than it did 30 years ago, despite making a good living for the owners.  But the dominant operating strategy is clearcut-n-run.  The industry's fading (as are all the resource extraction industries here in the NW, stripmined out in the feverish series of gold rushes between "discovery" and today), but it's not learning.

The difference between theory and practise in practise ...

by DeAnander (de_at_daclarke_dot_org) on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 02:21:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
So no opposition expected from the wood industry. Pity, here in Sweden the wood industry appear to have figured out that not only do they stand to loose from climate, they also stand to gain from forest-products being used instead of oil and coal.

Sweden had a lot of clear-cutting and decreasing forests in the 19th century, when timber companies bought forests for a song and then cut it down and moved on. This lead among other things to the conservation movement and national parks being established. Unless I am misinformed the rules are now working so that the forests has increased, in turn leading to more timber then a 100 years ago. There are from time to time scandals with crooks buying, clear-cutting and not replanting. When the law catches up with them the company is looted and the crooks gone. But these scandals are minor and both the large owners of forest - the government, the church, local government as well as forest companies (SCA, Stora Enso, etc) - and most small owners (mostly family-owned) seems to manage their forests well.

With owning forest comes also hunting rights, which socially is a big deal in rural communities. So it is a large part of the rural way of life.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 04:55:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
First in the demographic transition, first in sexual equality, first in democracy, first in education, and first in ecological wisdom. How tiresome.

I suggest that supra-national Scandy energies should be dedicated to developing some new revolutionary weapons technology, so overwhelming that the rest of the world could simply surrender without a fight, and a belevolent protectorate could be established to protect humanity from itself.

Time to revive Bonk Inc?

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Sun Oct 17th, 2010 at 06:34:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I wish some major media figure -- Colbert? -- would get hold of this and do a comedy routine that would go viral on Youtube -- some huge pie-in-face global exposure for the incredibly, smugly corrupt Harper regime.  But there's more material than there is time or famous comedians to tackle it... given what's going on in the US, Mafia-biz-as-usual in Ottawa is hardly going to get anyone's attention.

Besides...

Wasn't it Tom Lehrer who said that he had to stop writing political satire when Kissinger was awarded the Nobel?  that "satire was dead"?  Or was that Jules Feiffer?  (quick Google:  it was Lehrer, my brain cells are still retaining some info).

I like what Littlemore has to say about the mission of his blog:

Democracy is utterly dependent upon an electorate that is accurately informed. In promoting climate change denial (and often denying their responsibility for doing so) industry has done more than endanger the environment. It has undermined democracy. There is a vast difference between putting forth a point of view, honestly held, and intentionally sowing the seeds of confusion. Free speech does not include the right to deceive. Deception is not a point of view. And the right to disagree does not include a right to intentionally subvert the public awareness.

Although all public relations professionals are bound by a duty to not knowingly mislead the public, some have executed comprehensive campaigns of misinformation on behalf of industry clients on issues ranging from tobacco and asbestos to seat belts. Lately, these fringe players have turned their efforts to creating confusion about climate change. This PR campaign could not be accomplished without the compliance of media as well as the assent and participation of leaders in government and business.

The world’s best-qualified scientists agree that climate is changing and that the burning of fossil fuels is mostly to blame. Although there is no debate in peer reviewed science journals, the well-funded and highly organized public relations campaign has left the impression – in mainstream media – of a lively and continuing scientific controversy.

Scientists from within the fossil fuel industries’ own organizations raised red flags about climate change as early as 30 years ago – and they specifically dismissed the credibility of deniers by 1995. Yet the fossil fuel industry has continued to support efforts to subvert the science, attacking real scientists and promoting a cast of “skeptics” in their place. DeSmogBlog looks behind these deniers to test their credentials and to search out their source of funding.

Question:  should "freedom of speech" cover the right to produce and deploy campaigns of massively orchestrated deceit?

Creo que no.  Especially in areas where human life and happiness is urgently at stake -- like food and climate security, toxicity, economic policy -- disseminating self-serving counter-factual propaganda on behalf of the moneyed classes seems like a classic case of shouting Fire in the crowded theatre.

But who should decide what is deceitful?  In our fear of Government Censorship, Soviet style, we "liberals" seem to have walked spang into the lion's mouth of Corporate Brainwashing, Hill&Knowlton Style.  What's to be done?

The difference between theory and practise in practise ...

by DeAnander (de_at_daclarke_dot_org) on Thu Oct 14th, 2010 at 02:11:44 PM EST
I suppose it is an individual call as to whether a situation is self-satirizing or satire-proof.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Oct 14th, 2010 at 04:17:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the Florida Oil Spill Law blog, which has been following the BP Maconda (Deepwater Horizon) blowout and ensuing disaster in the Gulf of Mexico.  

Now it is kind of depressing:  BP has de facto superseded the US Government in all matters relating to the Gulf of Mexico (and President Obama himself has been taking orders and mouthing lies written for him by BP) and meanwhile the blog has been posting accounts and short videos from local people which reveal heartbreaking snippets of mass death, human health problems, and environmental devastation that will not recover for decades--if ever.  

Recently the Government has started claiming that Corexit--whose main ingredient 2-butoxyethylene is more toxic than the oil--is resulting in NO human health effects.  

But I find it heartening that that story is meeting resistance.  As one local put it:  "The Government is a joke."  

Too true.  It's not going to change, either.  It's not just climate change, and its not just the Gulf blowout.  It's everything.  I remember your post recounting how your local government (and newspaper) were celebrating the destruction through over-fishing of your local fishery.  Same greed and willful stupidity.  It is built into the very heart industrial civilization.  

The powers that be are all playing the strategy Last Man Standing.  Beyond that they see no future at all.  

And for them, there isn't one.  

The Fates are kind.

by Gaianne on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 12:18:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The powers that be are all playing the strategy Last Man Standing.  Beyond that they see no future at all.

Cue in Bob the Angry Flower:



By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 01:55:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
While Harper's regime parrots Suncor's agitprop (Canadians will emerge as "winners" from climate chaos), more realistic indicators suggest otherwise:

It's become clearer than ever that those nations that fail to lead on renewable energy risk becoming the big losers. Increasingly, money is flowing towards the green future. As the US Senate baulked at even the weakest of climate and energy bills in August, Deutsche Bank announced its annual "green" investment dollars – worth $6bn-$7bn (£3.8bn-£4.4bn) – would now focus on opportunities in China and western Europe. The bank's head of asset management described the US as "asleep at the wheel on this industrial revolution".

While Washington and others slept, China this year emerged as the leader in the green energy race.

footnote

Not looking like winners to me.

The difference between theory and practise in practise ...

by DeAnander (de_at_daclarke_dot_org) on Thu Oct 14th, 2010 at 11:07:21 PM EST
the parasite has almost finished choking the host in its immature, unreflective, reflexive greed.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 09:12:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Impossible Hamster Club :-)

The difference between theory and practise in practise ...
by DeAnander (de_at_daclarke_dot_org) on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 02:21:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
against the rogue Harper regime.

The Europeans and the Europeans could send warships to enforce it. (Easy enough to blocade the Northwest Passage.)

Though there is the problem of the porous southern frontier.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 03:34:26 AM EST
eurogreen:
The Europeans and the Europeans

? we have clones already?

:)

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 09:15:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"You have clones?" -- Some call them Americans. :-)

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 12:41:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
is what I meant to write
... obviously.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 01:02:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I suspected so but couldn't resist.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 12:17:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Future Chaos: There Is No "Plan B"  Guest post By Chris Martenson  Jesse's Café Américain

The hard news is that there is no "Plan B." The future is likely to be more chaotic than you probably think. This was the primary conclusion that I came to after attending the most recent Association for the Study of Peak Oil & Gas (ASPO) in Washington, DC in October, 2010.

The impact of Peak Oil on markets, lifestyles, and even national solvency deserves our very highest attention - but, it turns out, some important players seem to be paying no attention at all.

ASPO conferences tend to start early, end late, and be packed with more data and information than should be consumed in one sitting. Despite all this, I was riveted to my seat. This year's usual constellation of excellent region-by-region analyses confirmed what past participants already knew: Peak Conventional Oil arrived a few years ago, and new fields, enhanced recovery techniques, and unconventional oil plays are barely going to keep up with demand over the next few years.

But there were two reports that really stood out for me. The first was given by Rear Admiral Lawrence Rice, who presented the findings of the 2010 Joint Operating Environment (a forward-looking document examining the trends, contexts, and implications for future joint force commanders in the US military), which spends 76 pages summarizing the key trends and threats of the world. "Energy" occupies six of those pages, and Peak Oil dominates the discussion. Among the conclusions (on page 29), we find this hidden gem, which uses numbers and timing that are eerily similar to those that I put forth in my April 2009 report, Oil - The Coming Supply Crunch:

   By 2012, surplus oil production capacity could entirely disappear, and as early as 2015, the shortfall in output could reach nearly 10 MBD.

These projections are in line with what Luis De Sousa presented in his recent diary: The oil 'peak' has been reached. But this largely falls outside of the limits of discussion in the "mainstream media", servants of the existing order that they are. The most we can expect is an occasional "special report" on the subject.  

Chris notes that the existing paradigm for rationing scarce resources is by price and that that might not be the best way in the face of massive impending shortages. He cites agriculture as a prime example. He also notes that while the military and many businesses can see the problem coming and are doing what they can to prepare, on the political front nothing is being done in most countries because the short term costs are great and impact powerful economic incumbents whereas the benefits are long term and will only become obvious after the crisis hits.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 01:07:41 PM EST
Meanwhile, Canada looks like a nation of imbeciles to the rest of the thinking world.

If it is any consolation, I believe that, in the old classification system, an imbeciles are a step above  morons, the defining demographic for the USA. But what and where is this "thinking world" of which you speak?

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 06:37:49 AM EST
we surround you!

Canada, Italy, Brazil...People Power is Winning!

MAKING THE DIFFERENCE A victory in depth: Stopping "Crony-Media" in Canada Canadian Avaaz members successfully protected their democracy this month by shutting down a bid to subsidize a new, biased news channel with close ties to the Prime Minister's office. 83,000 people signed a petition against special government handouts for Sun TV - a propagandistic TV channel set up by Prime Minister Harper's former spin doctor, Kory Teneycke. The project was conceived after a secret lunch between Harper, Teneycke, and the infamous Rupert Murdoch, who ruthlessly exploits his vast media empire to manipulate political leaders of several major countries. Murdoch has spawned the radical right tea party movement in the US after being spurned by Barack Obama, employs 5 of the leading US Republican presidential candidates, and no UK government has won an election without his support in 30 years. Canadians were determined to stop Murdoch's "crony-media" style of subversion of democracy from being brought to Canada.

After Avaaz mobilized against SunTV, the media empire threw every big corporate tactic at us - smear pieces in a dozen of their newspapers, threats of lawsuits if we didn't immediately suspend the campaign, and even links to a criminal sabotage of our petition campaign. Avaaz members didn't scare and fought back with 83,000 petition signatures, 21,000 personal letters to the government's media commission, and over $400,000 donated to take on any lawsuits, fight the media battle and pursue a criminal investigation into the sabotage. The donations also allowed Avaaz to hire Canada's top lawyers and experts to help challenge SunTV's application to the government.

The result was a victory on all counts! Kory Teneycke was forced to resign, admitting he had "debased the debate" and SunTV abandoned its attempt to get its launch funded by a government handout. Murray Dobbin, a well-known commentator, wrote, "It is a huge victory for every Canadian who took time to write, email, phone or otherwise protest this grotesque plan to move Canadian political culture to the far right. And a victory in particular for Avaaz the on-line social movement that flushed Teneycke and his bully tactics into the open."

avaaz me hearties!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 12:54:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
thanks melo, I needed a note of cheer.

The difference between theory and practise in practise ...
by DeAnander (de_at_daclarke_dot_org) on Mon Oct 18th, 2010 at 07:40:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
you're welcome!

hope you come slumming blogging more often...

share the lerv

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Oct 18th, 2010 at 08:14:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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