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The end of the Tories

by Frank Schnittger Tue Sep 17th, 2019 at 09:57:16 PM EST

The dog that didn't bark

As the UK drifts ever closer to B-day, you would expect there would be a flurry of activity - tense overnight negotiations, crunch summits of key leaders, emotional parliamentary debates and cliff-hanging votes on difficult compromises. The reality is that nothing much is happening, and probably won't be happening for another month or so.

Parliament is prorogued, all the media focus will be on the annual party conference season, no serious detailed technical negotiations on the Withdrawal Agreement are taking place and Boris, having seen Juncker for the first time in his two months of premiership, decided he could afford to alienate the Prime Minister of a small EU member state - Xavier Bettell.

In London the Supreme Court is hearing a challenge to the legality of the lengthy proroguing of Parliament. But what difference will it make, even if it finds in favour of the plaintiffs? Parliament may end up returning earlier, but the key date - October 19th. has now been etched in stone - it is either a deal agreed by Parliament by then, or it's another extension, or at least that is what the law says.


But Boris has already said he will defy that law, so what's another legal finding on the legitimacy of the prorogation? Of course it will add another crack to the foundations of the UK Constitution - either putting the supreme Scottish and English courts at odds with one another, or putting the courts at odds with the Executive. No doubt the Mail will declare said judges to be TRAITORS if they dare to challenge the legality of the prorogation. Just another small step on the road down to fascism...

Boris has been declaring he is "slightly more optimistic" about securing a deal following his discussions with Varadker and Juncker - an optimism not shared by the EU leaders - both of whom have been quick to note they have yet to receive written proposals from the UK on alternatives to the Backstop. UK government ministers have been wheeled out to the Sunday talk shows to declare their optimism that progress is being made, but when asked for specifics they quickly retreat into "you wouldn't want me to declare our negotiating position on air, now would you?"

So what is really going on?

Two realities have slowly been sinking into the UK political psyche. The first, is that while the EU does not want a no-deal Brexit, it is increasing reconciled to it happening, and they are certainly not going to resile on previous commitments to Ireland to try and avoid it coming about. Real money is now being spent on the preparations, and the opposition to providing Boris with any kind of victory is becoming more and more entrenched. Ask Xavier Bettell.

The second is that if the UK does want a modified deal, the only area in which some compromise might be possible is in the reduction of the all UK backstop into a Northern Ireland only backstop - call it what you will. Of course the DUP will be outraged, but as Oliver Callan has neatly summarised, there are literally dozens of ways in which N. Ireland laws already diverge from UK laws - often at the behest of the DUP - and none of these differences are said to undermine the Union with Britain.

So if Boris wants a deal, "the landing zone" has been clearly defined. He may just want to wait until the last minute to blind-side the DUP and claim that he has driven a hard bargain. He may calculate that they will then have no option but to acquiesce, given the disastrous consequence of no deal for the N. Ireland economy. If so, he may be disappointed. They have had a century of practice of saying NO, and really have never quite figured out a way of saying anything else.

But does Boris really want a deal?

Any deal Boris can negotiate will put him at loggerheads with the Brexit party - the real threat to him winning a general election - and with most of the ERG, some Tory rebels, and probably the DUP as well. He cannot afford to go into an election championing a deal that is very little different to May's deal with half the conservative party and all of the Brexit party against him.

The Leave vote would be split, and Corbyn could romp home on less than 30% of the vote. So the only way Boris could agree to a deal is if he has had some private assurances from Corbyn that he will provide a parliamentary majority for it, and that is not going to happen. Labour is becoming an increasingly Remain party, and the opposition to anything Boris might cook up is absolutely visceral.

Polls now show "no deal" to be the most popular form of Brexit amongst leavers in any case, and no amount of Yellowhammer papers predicting doom and gloom is going to make any difference. Brexit has become an emotional crusade, not a rational economic or political choice. The last four polls show the Conservatives with an average 9% lead over Labour and with the Remain vote badly split between Labour and the Lib Dems. So for Boris, a general election it has to be, and preferably after he has delivered Brexit on Nov. 1st., and thereby destroyed the very raison d'etre of the Brexit Party as a competing political force.

So what we are seeing now is mere window dressing to give the appearance of negotiating with the EU so that he can later blame "EU intransigence" for his failure to secure a deal which would have been "in everyone's interest". There may be some further grandstanding at the EU summit on 17/18th. Oct., but that will be it. There really isn't a whole lot going on. If the DUP are going to be sold down the river, it will be after a no-deal Brexit has happened and Boris has secured his overall Commons majority in a general election.

We don't even know if the current Withdrawal Agreement with a N. Ireland only Backstop will still be on offer after a no deal Brexit has happened, as attitudes will have hardened further, and unanimity will be required from the EU side. But here the EU's unanimous stance to date is actually extremely helpful to Boris. As long as Ireland is ok with the deal, it is likely the EU Council would still find a consensus to agree - despite the anger it will undoubtedly feel at the economic disruption and increased costs Brexit will have caused in the meantime.

So what is Boris' game plan?

So the main outstanding problem for Boris now is how he can force a general election given the constraints of the Fixed Term Parliament Act. Corbyn is most unlikely to give him the two thirds majority he needs, so the only way to force an election is to lose a vote of no confidence and ensure no one else can win a vote of confidence within 14 days.

Losing a vote of confidence shouldn't be a problem, especially if he defies the law and doesn't seek an A.50 extension by October 20th. as he has promised he will not do. And Brexit will have happened by the time the 14 days have elapsed and so he will get his cherished no deal Brexit on Nov. 1st. followed by a general election.

Of course any Prime Minister with a shred of honour and dignity would resign on Oct. 20th. having failed to secure a deal, having lost a vote of confidence in the House of Commons, having failed to ask for an A.50 extension, and possibly having been held in contempt of Court for breaking the law and ignoring a Court Order.

His difficulty will be that should he resign, the Queen might ask the Leader of Her Majesty's Opposition to form a Government which would then ask for an A.50 extension. And the beauty of that situation from a Commons perspective is that Corbyn wouldn't even have to win a vote of confidence in the House of Commons first - sparing the rebel Tories and Lib Dems the horrific prospect of having to vote for Corbyn as Prime Minister!

So Boris would probably try to brazen it out: Ignore Parliament and the Courts on the grounds that - like any dictator - he is merely carrying out the "WILL OF THE PEOPLE, and wait for Nov. 1st to come along followed by a general election he will in all probably win with the Brexit Party neutralized. A general election win can also retro-actively wash away any crimes Boris may have been deemed to have committed, and any pretence that the UK is a law abiding democracy will have been abandoned.

So is a no deal Brexit now inevitable?

The only way the House of Commons can avoid this scenario would be to vote confidence in Corbyn as PM and ask the Queen to to demand Boris' resignation and appoint Corbyn PM. Many Lib Dems and rebel Tories will no doubt yammer on about finding a "compromise caretaker" PM to avoid having to vote for Corbyn, but the fact is that Corbyn will be delivering the vast majority of any votes for an alternative PM, and will be in a position to demand that he is the only logical alternative.

Lib Dem and rebel Tory MPs will be able to console themselves that they are only voting for Corbyn in a caretaker capacity to request an A.50 extension, and that he will not be allowed to implement his "socialist agenda". Most, I suspect, will bite the bullet if the alternative is an imminent No-deal Brexit.

So what would a Corbyn government do?

But once Corbyn is appointed PM the whole ball game changes. Firstly, the A.50 extension will give him a breathing space until at least the 31st. Jan. 2020. Secondly, a mid-winter election is against all UK electoral tradition. Thirdly he can claim he will need a few months to legislate for a second referendum where the options will be Remain and a "credible Brexit deal". Fourthly, he will claim he needs time to negotiate a better "credible" Brexit deal for Britain, and also a better deal for Britain should voters decide to remain within the EU.

Many former Remain voters now support Brexit because they believe the first referendum vote should be respected, and because they feel it would be humiliating for the UK to remain within the EU after all that has happened. Critical to allowing them to change their minds would be to demonstrate that the second public vote is actually quite distinct from the first and offers a choice between a very precisely defined Brexit deal and a better deal for Remaining. The is no shame in voters changing their minds when offered a different choice.

The Brexit deal would be negotiated by Corbyn's Brexit secretary and would consist of May's deal with a N. Ireland only Backstop and a greatly expanded political declaration. (It is noteworthy than Boris has never even mentioned renegotiating the political declaration).

The Remain deal will be negotiated by Corbyn or his Foreign Secretary with the incoming Ursula Van der Leyen Commission, and will consist of a reform of Commission policies from a social democratic perspective, as opposed to the neo-liberal reforms sought by previous UK Tory PMs. It probably won't contain much the Commission wasn't planning to do anyway, and can't be very radical as it will also require EU Council and Parliament support.

However it has previously been noted that there is nothing in the Labour Party manifesto which is incompatible with EU law, and which isn't already happening in other EU member states. Some issues, like state aid to troubled companies, might need some finessing, but there is no reason why the European Investment Bank cannot set up a separate division to supervise such aid and avoid charges of national governments aiding their companies to compete more effectively with rival companies from other member states.

The vast majority of Labour policy priorities - improved public services, increased corporate taxation, anti-trust legislation against monopolies, public ownership of key infrastructural services, workers rights, consumer rights, human rights, climate change etc. are not incompatible with EU priorities, and it is only because previous UK attempts at EU reform have been Tory led that more has not been achieved.

What would the political outcome be?

So the second public vote, to be held in the Spring, if necessary after another A.50 extension, will offer voters a choice between a precisely defined Brexit deal and a "reformed", "more caring" and "more accountable and transparent" EU. Farage will shout blue murder because his preferred option - a no deal Brexit - will not be on offer. He may even call for voter abstention, in the hope that a depressed turnout will ensure that any Remain vote, even if it wins the referendum, will not exceed the 17 Million who voted Leave in the first referendum, and thus help him to delegitimize the result and call for a third "best of three" referendum.

The Tories will be in a difficult position. They could follow Farage's absolutist no deal lead, but many pragmatists may argue that any Brexit is better than no Brexit, and that once the UK is out there is nothing to prevent them sundering further ties with the EU in due course as Ireland had done following the initial, very partial independence from Britain in 1922. They will of course also claim that the DUP has been betrayed and the Union threatened, but I doubt many will care. In essence, the Leave vote will be divided between no deal abstainers and more moderate pragmatists. In that circumstance I would expect Remain to win, possibly by a margin similar to the 2:1 margin the 1975 referendum on EU membership was carried.

Of course the shallow consensus that tolerated Corbyn in office for far longer than many expected will dissolve just as soon as the Referendum is over and a general election will then be called. The Lib Dems will try to position themselves as the real opposition to Corbyn who they will continue to claim is lukewarm on Remain even if he has actively campaigned for Remain in both referendums. They may even oppose the "socialist" deal for Remain Labour will have negotiated with the EU. The Tories will be in melt-down having failed to "deliver Brexit" and Farage will try to garner the vast bulk of an angry and disillusioned Leave vote.

I would expect Labour to win that general election, probably with an overall majority, and with the Lib Dems, or even the Brexit party, displacing the Tories as the main party of opposition. There will be a price to pay for having foisted Brexit upon the nation and the national humiliation which followed, and that price will cost the Tories their place in the duopoly of power at Westminster.

Display:
As Fintan O'Toole's article is behind a paywall, I reproduce below a small section which illustrated the argument some Brexiteers are making in support of accepting an imperfect Brexit deal:
The pro-Brexit Conservative MEP Daniel Hannan directly compared Theresa May's Chequers proposals of June 2018 to the approach of the pro-Treaty side in the early years of Irish independence.

"When the Irish Free State left the UK, in 1921, there were all sorts of conditions about Treaty ports and oaths of supremacy and residual fiscal payments. And what very quickly became apparent was not just that those things were unenforceable once the split had been realised; it was that everyone in Britain kind of lost interest in enforcing them.

"And although there were some difficulties along the way in the 1920s, it turned out to have been better to have grabbed what looked like an imperfect independence and then built on it rather than risking the entire process."

In this vertiginous analogy, in the 1920s and 1930s Britain is the EU and Ireland is, um, Britain. Now, the EU is Britain and Britain is Ireland.

When the room stops spinning and vision is restored, what can be focused on is the breathtaking nature of the shift in self-image. The British are now the people against whom they themselves once unleashed Oliver Cromwell and the Black and Tans, the gallant indigenous occupants of a conquered and colonised territory rising up against their imperial overlords.



Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Tue Sep 17th, 2019 at 11:19:03 PM EST
The only way the House of Commons can avoid this scenario would be to vote confidence in Corbyn and ask the Queen to to demand Boris' resignation and appoint Corbyn PM.

Assuming that the Supreme Court decides the prorogation is illegal I could well imagine that Commons would vote confidence in Corbyn for an interim government. First, it might be wise to pass a law requiring that Parliament consent to future prorogations, lest Boris immediately again progogue Parliament. Even in that circumstance I could see Bercow refusing prorogation and sending a committee to the Queen seeking Corbyn's appointment. What do you think of the liklihood of these developments?

BTW, does Parliament have a jail to which they could send a dismissed PM who has been found in contempt? Would the Tower do? Or would the Supreme Court be in charge of this action> If Boris wants to go back to the spirit of the first half of the 16th Century regarding the Constitution why should he not be subject to punishments appropriate to that age? Cutting of his head would certainly add an exclamation mark to the end of this particularly grotesque legal time travel experiment.


"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 03:28:09 AM EST
How might the Supreme Court rule? by Joanna Cherry QC MP, plaintiff

Cherry doesn't mention which department of UK "constitution"  would enforce a judgment of the UK Supreme Court.

In the US which branch of government enforces orders of a court?

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 04:17:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]

(I for one am puzzled as how to measure the mid-point of a constitutional crisis. I hope the SCOTUK addresses these and other riveting questions relating proper prorogations to legislation by the several parliaments. )

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 05:47:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Crime and its Punishment in Victorian Hong Kong by Revue Francaise de Civilisation Britannique (FR, EN)

See also Issue XXIV-1 | 2019 | Les Enjeux de l'interdisciplinarité en civilisation britannique

As ethnography goes, these are pretty amusing samples of principles of the ahhh discipline.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 05:59:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I doubt the UK Supreme Court will find the prorogation illegal - at most somewhat excessive - and perhaps therefore order an earlier return of Parliament as the most appropriate remedy - something I don't think Boris would be too bothered about.

After all, what can Parliament do, prior to October 19th.? Listen to an earlier Queen's speech? How wonderful! Listen to Ministers proclaim what wonderful things they will do with the money they will receive in a budget that will never happen? Riveting. Ventilate its own divisions as to what should happen next? Music to Boris' ears...

The Queen may not receive visitors not sent by her Ministers, and even if she does, one will listen politely and seek the advice and guidance of the PM and President of the Privy Council (Rees-Mogg). Who's this Bercow chappie?

Possession is 9/10ths of the law, and therefore Boris can at most be found guilty of 10% of it. A way will be found for him to purge his contempt. Put not your trust in lawyers! [Psalm 146:3-5 King James Version (KJV), Schnittger Edition].

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 06:16:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
From the mouths of hebrew prophets to you ears, but of course. British convention demands "flexibility."

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 06:39:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
BTW, does Parliament have a jail to which they could send a dismissed PM who has been found in contempt?

They can lock someone in the clocktower, though the last time that happened was 1880. The last time they fined anyone was 1666.

More modern parliaments have put these powers on a statutory basis, both to define them and to prevent challenges.

by IdiotSavant on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 01:58:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Even with the renovation works going on?
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 02:02:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That just means an additional sentence of asbestosis.
by IdiotSavant on Thu Sep 19th, 2019 at 10:47:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Here in the USA, Congress (each Huse I believe) can only dismess itself by majority vote of a quorum.

I shudder to think of a system whereby Donald Trump can just dismiss Congress on his own say-so.

Sounds more like dictatorship.

by StillInTheWilderness on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 03:52:48 AM EST
Suspending "parliament": Why it could  happen in USA
US Constitution, Art. II, Section 3
just add "national emergency" executive order (EO)

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 04:08:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Got me there.
by StillInTheWilderness on Sat Sep 21st, 2019 at 03:02:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
he seems to have dispensed with the Constitution, so why not? He is your Sun King, l'etat, c'est moi.

Good luck with getting him out of the White House after he "loses" in november 20

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 02:50:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nope.

Team Trump has plumbed more than a few plot holes in US Constitution which United States Code (USC) could have have plugged IF more members of current and past legislatures were not simply FUNCTIONAL ILLITERATES pimping patronage and predisposed to, well, "fairness" for all under de law.

But they aren't. PLUS, writing code is hard werk. So. Blue Screen of Death FTW, it is!

"Convention" meets 5th Amendment, again!

archived inequity and iniquity
that cumulative work product is defective

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 04:33:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
< wipes tears >

When questioning the witness Corey LEWANDOWSKI:

REP. KEN BUCK (R-CO): Do you believe that Vladmimir Putin is sitting in his office right now in the Kremilin laughing at those on the other side of the aisle are doing and believing that those on the others side of the aisle are useful idiots, helping ...
REP. SHEILA LEE (D-CA): Objection, Mr ... I have a point of order.
COMMITTEE CHAIR, REP. JEROLD NADLER (D-NY): The [?] lady will state her point of order.
REP. SHEILA LEE (D-CA): I have a point of order. According to the rules and the
rules of this committee and the House rules, um, we cannot attribute derogatory names to our colleague or motive to our colleagues. And I believe the gentleman [REP. KEN BUCK] said, 'those on the other side of the aisle are idiots.' ...
[emphasis added]

At least one fact not in evidence.


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 07:31:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Of course the diary above is only one possible scenario amongst many, but it has come to be my mainstream expectation. I have avoided describing many others as it is long enough as it is.

But I have also re-read it many times to try and discover what is the least likely twist to the tale: where is it most likely to go wrong with the result that the outcome could be very different.

On reflection, the most likely flaw in my story is that Parliament will simply fail to get its act together. It may vote no confidence in Boris but fail to vote confidence in anyone else to form a government resulting in a no deal Brexit happening by default and a subsequent general election victory for Boris.

One should not underestimate the importance of fierce rivalries, petty jealousies, personal dislikes, ideological objections, and sheer cussed incompetence in shaping major events. Wars have been caused by less.

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 10:28:01 AM EST
Clearly, your scenario is not to the advantage of the Libdems.

Would they, therefore, prefer to prevent or defeat a confidence vote in an alternative PM not of their choosing, thereby precipitating hard Brexit to their own electoral advantage?

I think they would.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 01:44:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In my scenario the Lib Dems end up displacing the Tories in the Westminster power duopoly, with Jo Swinson becoming leader of her Majesty's Opposition - quite an advance on where they are now. I doubt they would retain much credibility/support if they ended up enabling a no deal Brexit because of their antipathy to Corbyn.

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 02:37:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have no idea what happens. Will TWBJ (that wanker B... J....) obey the law? Are ther actually any laws that can stop him doing what he wants? Will he ask for an extention just cos he's been told to do it?

There is no way of knowing. I rather suspect that there will periods of Octber/early November where large quantities of alcohol may be the only way I'll be funtional.

It's a very good job that, at a time of civil ferment, we will shortly be able to legally buy industrial quantities of explosives, ostenibly to celebrate Eid/Diwali/Halloween (not actually a British thing) and Guy Fawkes night. Anybody who thiks that there will be no possible consequence arising from that is probably on better booze than I can afford

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 02:56:01 PM EST
The event which has has not occurred is Mr No-Deal "breaking" one or more laws, specifically, failure to submit a request (SCHEDULE FORM LETTER) on behalf of parliament for "A.50(3) extension period" before expiry of the current A.50(3) extension period.

Should that event occur, the presses will inform errybuddy what de jure or de facto penalty one or more "branches" of UK "constitution," excluding royal prerogatives, imposes on Johnson.

OR you could search legislation.gov.uk to "suggest" relevant statute(s).

Errybuddy already knows the result (which is not a penalty) of any expiration of "A.50(3) extension period."


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 04:52:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I would say that in the current Anglo-American political systems, where "break all the rules" is the rule, the possibilities offered here are not nearly radical enough.

Trump has shown that a strong executive can command fealty from even the most powerful and wealthy people if the right pressure is applied. There is zero sign of a collapse of the republican party in the US, despite his incredibly long list of failures. One should not expect a collapse of the Tories if Brexit fails OR if it succeeds: the politicians will find plenty of arguments to justify ongoing support in either case.

Johnson has a pile of options, it seems, from my naive viewpoint. For example, if the current proroguing of parliament is found illegal, just prorogue it again. If the current proroguing expires, just prorogue it some more.

Or, claim an emergency situation due to, say, a flood from hurricane , thus justifying special PM privileges to control government. The Civil Contingencies Act seems to provide the necessary features.

Or, temporarily move the PM's office to Northern Ireland to avoid interference by troublesome law enforcement officers.

Or, call up the POTUS and ask for some ridiculous proclamation that will stir up all sides, perhaps something like "the US will be buying Scotland for conversion to a golfing estate."

Or get out the campaign bus and double down on the impossible promises. It works for Trump.

Once you break out of the tradition and good behavior and reasonable proposal zone, there are plenty of possibilities.

by asdf on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 03:46:10 PM EST
Once you get one assumption wrong, an array of alternate futures present themselves, and for each of those alternates, a further array of downstream scenarios present themselves.

You can analyse yourself into paralysis if you try to cover all eventualities, so I have focused on the most likely outcome at each point in the decision tree conscious that even one minor error can result in a very different array of outcomes.

No one end outcome seems very likely, all are a consequence of a string of events that are inherently unusual or unprecedented even if each individual decision seems logical enough. In hindsight many will claim to have foreseen all and indeed claim the outcome was obvious all along.

I look forward to reading lots of "histories" of Brexit claiming everything was the inevitable outcome because blah blah blah. The reality is nobody "knows" but strategists and actors have to make predictions so they can prepare for whatever outcomes eventuate, and with luck, anticipate them and influence them to their advantage.

There are lots of things I would be telling Corbyn right now if I were an advisor and his objective was to be a successful and effective PM... doesn't mean I would always get it right.

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 05:15:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Boris seems to be having a bad day in SCOTUK. Just one instance here:
Brexit:  Boris Johnson can't be trusted not to engage in 'low, dishonest, dirty tricks', supreme court told
Were I forced to put my trust in lawyers I would much prefer Panick or O'Neil to Reed or Keen. Similarly on Tuesday:
Lord Pannick stays calm and Keen lacks interest at supreme court  

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 03:48:33 PM EST
12 are seated for the hearing, including "the lord in the chair". uh oh. Does each vote on the disposition of an application?

Inquiring minds are interested to understand "why decisions had been taken". Others not so much.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 04:08:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I saw coverage indicating that only 11 will vote so as to preclude a tie. Perhaps the 'lord in the chair' presides but does not vote.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 04:57:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Seeeeeeeeeee?

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 05:42:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Beyond the thorny issue of brext, whither the Tory party?

I'm not alone in thinkng that it will split in half. As I've said on several occassions, the big electoral opportunity for the LibDems is for the soft right One Nation conservative business vote. they've actually been trending in this direction for about a decade now, but this represents a real opportunity to make inroads by sweeping up disaffected tory MPs.

The ERG Brexit Firsters will retain the name but will gradually merge with uki/brexit party. If not formally, then certainly the membership will migrate over (this has already happened with ukip).

the big question is who gets the donors? Again, I thik this breaks 50:50. The City disaster capitlists and hedge funders will go with the tories, the SME/manufacturers and associated finance houses will go with the LibDems.

In the short term anyway. Quite how that pans out in the long term.....dunno

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 05:45:44 PM EST
The UK's party system has already splintered and "rebels" rebranded. At some point UKNs will think about the past performance of individual, incumbent MPs as indicative of future performance ("pattern of behavior") rather than standard color (blue, red) before casting their measly ballots for election of desirable "policy" enacted by incumbents.

Or not.



Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 05:59:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I suspect that the vast majority of Sanders supporters would migrate to Warren if she were the party candidate, and vice versa. There is not much between them on policies...
by asdf on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 11:25:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 06:04:16 PM EST
The EU accuses Boris Johnson of only 'pretending' to negotiate a Brexit deal
Michel Barnier, the EU's chief Brexit negotiator, has suggested Boris Johnson is merely "pretending to negotiate" Brexit as his European counterparts await details of his proposals to replace the Irish backstop, a key part of the withdrawal agreement.

The UK prime minister has repeatedly promised to try and remove the backstop, a measure designed to ensure that no new border checks emerge on the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland, claiming that it is anti-democratic.

But Johnson's negotiators have so far only presented the EU with a draft of the withdrawal agreement with the backstop scrubbed out, and are not planning to take their plan to the EU until October, weeks before the Brexit deadline.



Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 08:25:32 PM EST
< wipes tears >

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 09:33:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
[No Shit, Sherlock!]

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Sep 19th, 2019 at 06:28:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
DW talks to Nicola Sturgeon
DW: It doesn't look like the Supreme Court will rule against the suspension of parliament. Do you really think that whole process will settle what is essentially political?
authorities of all elected members of parliament to vote "a deal," or legislate "a way forward" for ["]the government["] to execute.
STURGEON: Well, there has to be some limits on the ability of ["]a government["] and in this case a minority government to close down parliament in order to avoid scrutiny. So I hope, and I respect the independence of the judiciary, but I hope the Supreme Court will find that the prorogation of parliament was unlawful as Scottish court reached that conclusion last week, and then we can see parliament recalled and much needed scrutiny applied to Boris Johnson's whole approach to BREXIT. His approach, I think, is to see the UK "crash out" without "a deal" but be able to blame the European Union for that.
"dead lock" in parliament
Instead we need to avoid "a no deal" BREXIT and request an extension to Article 50 if necessary and then see a general election and a further referendum to try to get the UK ["]a way out["] of this.
Parliament's Article 50 revocation? Parliament's approval of the Withdrawal Agreement? No.
DW: How likely is it that the UK will ["]crash out["] of the EU without ["]a deal["]? And would it mean ["]the end["] for the United Kingdom?
STURGEON: I think it is a significant risk that the UK will "crash out" without "a deal" and that will have a severe impact on many people in Scotland and elsewhere in the UK, and I do think that will make it even more likely that Scotland chooses to become an independent country. I don't want to see that damage be done to Scotland or the rest of the UK, so we will continue to try to avoid a "no deal" BREXIT, but it's very difficult to see how "a deal" is struck that both satisfies the European Union and also gets a majority in the House of Commons. A "no deal" BREXIT cannot be ruled out, although we should seek a further extension. That is the only way to avoid it.
'Twas a pity parliament had no confidence in attaining "a majority" by general election before deciding to request another A.50(3) extension to Jan 2020, because expiration date.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Wed Sep 18th, 2019 at 09:25:54 PM EST
Should prorogation be ruled invalid by SCOTUK and Parliament be reconvened in September, say the 23rd, Parliament could then again seize control of the order and, at that time, vote no confidence in the administration. Grounds could be misleading the Queen and systematically undermining the sovereignty of Parliament.  They would then have the 14 days before they could call for a VOC for a new interim government led by Corbyn. Or just call the VOC and wait him out, pulling the trigger on the 15th day. In the process repeatedly make it clear that this is happening because Boris squandered his majority by expelling Remain Tories. Any number can play the game of making it up as they go.

They could find Boris in contempt of Parliament and lock him up in the clock tower or other facility that they could designate. That would impede further machinations. And they could pass legislation requiring the consent of Parliament to any prorogation. It would be hard for Boris' government to make credible arguments that this is a violation of custom, as the whole present situation is based on the government's ongoing violation of customs.

First drive a stake through the vampire, then deal with the angry mob. Elections could wait until April. By that time disillusionment would have set in for the average Brexiteer.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Sep 19th, 2019 at 02:50:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Me thinks one option for the House of Commons would be to vote no confidence in Boris as PM and demand his resignation, but not vote no confidence in his government in the form prescribed by the Fixed Term Parliament Act (as this would trigger the 14 day period required to expire before a general election can be called) - a general election they would very likely lose so long as the Conservatives and the Brexit Party remain united.

The thing is, a majority of the House wants Boris to resign so the Queen can nominate an alternative PM, but a majority of the House may not yet be able to agree on who that alternative PM should be. Asking the Queen to nominate an alternative takes that decision out of their hands and avoids the necessity for rebel conservatives and Lib Dems to voted for Corbyn as PM - something they would very much rather not have to do.

They could then abstain on any votes of no confidence Boris & friends might table in the New PM probably allowing him to survive with a slim majority again not having to vote for Corbyn. MPs must be allowed to preserve their petty hatreds you see, and voting for Corbyn as PM is the kiss of death for any conservative MP (be they ever so rebellious) or the Lib Dems who are trying to set themselves up as the not Corbyn opposition.

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Thu Sep 19th, 2019 at 07:45:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
change of government: "the Queen can nominate an alternative PM, but a majority of the House may not yet be able to agree on who that alternative PM should be [since] Asking the Queen to nominate an alternative takes that decision out of their hands".

Just this evening the common wisdom is reported: "the monarch... is meant to remain above the political fray" unlike a duly, well, elected "government" sworn to secrecy in "dealings" with the monarch. Unless suspect motives of the PM and Privy Council meeting to consult the monarch are detected by paranormal actvities of MPs or journalists, and broadcast "displeasure".

A source quoted by the BBC said "it serves no one's interests" for conversations between the prime minister and the queen to be made public and "it makes it very hard for The Relationship to thrive".


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Fri Sep 20th, 2019 at 04:04:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Risk of no-deal Brexit 'very real', Juncker tells EU lawmakers
EU lawmakers backed a resolution calling for the UK to be granted another extension, after the current one expires on 31 October, to allow more time for London to agree the terms of its withdrawal.

The resolution, passed by a hefty 544 to 126 majority, states that MEPs are open to an extension, though Parliament President David Sassoli said this could only be if the UK held an election or a referendum.

oops. How 'bout that "minority" report, eh.
"If the UK leaves without a deal, all these questions will not disappear - they are still be there and need to be settled prior to a future relationship with the UK," Barnier told EU lawmakers.
[...]
"At the moment it is not Britain leaving the EU, but jobs and businesses leaving Britain," European People's Party (EPP) leader Manfred Weber said to jeers from the Brexit party.

archived EP
European Parliament chooses otherwise, 3 Jul
replaces outgoing conservative president Antonio Tajani
Dealmaker?, 13 Sep
with the support of #Brexit Steering Group, the role of the #EP will remain crucial.
'Hulk' finally meets EU's Juncker, 16 Sep
unveils the Brexit resolution, which would insist that the backstop remain in the deal.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Sep 19th, 2019 at 03:08:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Call me crazy (and I know you will) but I'm thinking that the first item of business for parliament, when it returns from involuntary, unscheduled retreat in the hinterlands, had better not be "scrutiny" of Johnson's "approach to BREXIT".

I'm thinking, it had better be notification for EU Council of the passage of a motion to revise EUWA-2-2019 SCHEDULE FORM LETTER.

The revision shall take into account the "way forward" at page 1 (emended) or page 2 (amended at length) of parliament's imminent process of a tabled resolution to reconsider a "snap election" (previously defeated) stipulating such and such date on or before expiration of the extension of the "A.50(3) period" requested.

Further, its complimentary close had better express the sincerest sense of parliament's commitment to "a way forward" demonstrated by its agreement to dispense with holiday recess.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Sep 19th, 2019 at 04:15:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The problem is the EU is by Treaty an organisation which deals with the Governments of members states and not their Parliaments or other institutions. The House of Commons can write to the EU all they want, (and probably receive polite acknowledgements), but the EU Council can only grant an extension request received from the Government.

So the trick is for the HOC to trigger a change of government (if Boris will not comply with legal requirement to request A.50 extension) without triggering an election which many independent/rebel/small party MPs would likely lose at this stage.

Basically a second referendum has to happen (to take Brexit off the table) before the opposition can allow a general election to take place - an election they might then win because the Conservatives will have failed to "deliver Brexit" and the Leave vote will then be split between the Conservatives and the Brexit party.

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Thu Sep 19th, 2019 at 07:55:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Barriers to the EU concluding any treaty are many, but recognition of a "government" representing the state is not one. The EU observes the expansive Artcle 7 VCLT definition if a state representative as does the UN.

Regarding conclusion of A.50, appointment of that agent by the PM of the day, acting instead of HRM, is a constitutional dilemma peculiar to the UK. (Guidance to the work of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) Treaty Section) Parliamentary legislation partly precludes the full powers of the PM but not the monarch. Accordingly and irrespective of whomsoever forms HRM "government" and expresses "government" policy or enters agreements made by HRM and another state laid by it before parliament for approval, without HoC approval the agreement will not enter force.

Parliament has agreed multiple times not to approve the Withdrawal Agreement with the EU.

Parliament has agreed multiple times not to approve a general election or referendum (not binding on parliament by statute in any case). It is to this "anti-democratic" disposition of parliament that my remarks --as well as EU officers--are meant to draw attention of UKNs: The political "majority" of MPs seated express no intention to effect the WA and no "mandate" to enact an alternative to the TEU now or in future. Its purpose is redundant.

There is no "trick" waiting for change of "government" absent change in composition of the HoC willing and able to approve any "government" policy.

"If the UK leaves without a deal, all these questions will not disappear - they are still be there and need to be settled prior to a future relationship with the UK," Barnier told EU lawmakers.
##Democracy is not well understood.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Thu Sep 19th, 2019 at 06:53:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Boris Johnson given [30 September] EU deadline for ["]Irish backstop["] plan
France's president, Emmanuel Macron, and Finland's prime minister, Antti Rinne, told reporters in Paris that they were both "concerned about what is happening in Britain".
[...]
Rinne said: "We both agreed that it is now time for Boris Johnson to produce his own proposals in writing - if they exist. If no proposals are received by the end of September, then it's over."

A deadline of 30 September would be highly problematic for the prime minister as it falls on the eve of the Conservative party conference [BWAH!], and it remains to be seen whether the EU will stick to the threat.

pennies from heaven
During talks with Juncker and the EU's chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, the prime minister was shown in detail how allowing Northern Ireland to stick to common EU rules on food and livestock, known as sanitary and phytosanitary measures (SPS), would still fail to avoid checks on the vast majority of goods that cross the Irish border. ... senior EU sources confirmed that Johnson had expressed surprise during the lunch at the complexity of the situation, and that it appeared to have been a "bit of a reality check to hear it from EU officials".

archived
"the responsibility of the United Kingdom"

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Thu Sep 19th, 2019 at 05:10:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The EU really needs to stop setting deadlines with empty threats if they are not prepared to act decisively if deadlines are not met. It only serves to undermine their credibility and consolidate a reputation for prevarication, procrastination and indecisiveness.

What bubble has BoJo been living in if he has to learn of the complexity of the situation from EU Officials?

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Thu Sep 19th, 2019 at 08:02:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It only serves to undermine their credibility

spoken like a died-in-the-wool Tory projecting "blame" on Johnnie Foreigner, who is simultaneously working with Boris Johnson to prevent UK sovereignty by enabling parliament's extension addiction. 'slike Opium trade.

< wipes tears >

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Sep 19th, 2019 at 07:04:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's a universal principle of negotiation - never make a threat you aren't prepared to follow through on - otherwise you are just undermining your own credibility

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Thu Sep 19th, 2019 at 08:20:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't doubt. Quite the violent culture accustomed to coercion.

A threat is no part of negotiation, however. These concepts don't belong in the same sentence.

Perhaps you confuse "bluff" (pretext) with threat?

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Sep 19th, 2019 at 10:05:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, technically, it's not the EU talking, but the president of Finland, Finland currently holding the rotating EU presidency, I'll grant you.

More to the point, I don't see much of a threat in the statement: "it's over" isn't threatening anyone with anything. What would following through consist of in such a situation? Stopping the negotiations by Sept. 30 rather than Oct. 31?

by Bernard on Fri Sep 20th, 2019 at 01:23:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I can't see the EU stopping negotiations on Sept. 30th. if there is still some prospect of a deal. And if they do keep talking, the Brits will be the first to say "look, see, they always give in in the end. All we have to do is keep stringing them along... and then, as Boris says they'll compromise further at the last minute."

The main point of the BBC's news analysis today was that some progress is being made: for months the EU have been saying the Withdrawal Agreement is closed and can't be renegotiated, and now, here we are renegotiating it.

Of course the EU has always been open to changing the Backstop to a N. Ireland only backstop - even calling it something else or adding some consultative process to it - but these finer points get missed in what passes for news analysis on the BBC these days.

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Fri Sep 20th, 2019 at 02:47:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Frank, your intuition about NI status was correct, if not politic, from the beginning. Eurotrib enjoyed some laughs at the expense of Hong Kong SAR, pirate colony past and present, until T. May went full-unionist-retard.

The salient lesson is, do not negotiate with incoherent persons.

The EU has attempted simply to communicate (algebra, property of numbers) terms of an agreement with the tree from which the most illiterate, ignorant, and litigious apple on the planet has fallen. I know whereof I speak.

Now it is time to walk away and wish UK a speedy recovery. I might have mentioned.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Fri Sep 20th, 2019 at 09:24:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's becoming way too subtle for many Continentals who are not following the subtleties of the British political debate closely enough. In the end, is it really going to make a difference?

If De Pfeffle & Cummings really think that the EU27 will cave in at the last minute, whatever Rinne says isn't going to change their mind.

by Bernard on Sat Sep 21st, 2019 at 07:41:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
  1. UK has been negotiating with itself since Cameron opened his big, fat referendum campaign.
  2. EU concluded negotiation of the WA 17 Nov 2018 (with UK 11 Mar 2019). Much denial from "stakeholders" ensued when EU revised the IE-NI Protocol specifically to help T. May secure parliamentary approval for "meaningful vote" No. n+1 and despite EC assurances thereafter that negotiation of the WA is over. So UK continues to fish IE-NI Protocol negotiation with stale "alternative arrangements" bait --2017 "backstop" options.
  3. Art. 50 promises (I think now, this is the word some people have been avoiding) secession of the notifying party in the event of "no deal" or no unanimously agreed "A.30(3) extension period". Treaty qua contract: What consideration have the consenting parties to TEU agreed? ##Rule of law is not well understood.
  4. DICTION CORNER: to negotiate, to come to terms or reach an agreement; independent clauses. So. Witness, still, UK negotiating with itself "in accordance with its own constitutional requirements" and words of encouragement to UK from the EU gallery to fulfill its promise.


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Fri Sep 20th, 2019 at 08:55:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by asdf on Thu Sep 19th, 2019 at 07:50:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by Cat on Fri Sep 20th, 2019 at 02:38:59 AM EST
walp, The party conferences are on--as predicted by Voldemort and his dotty puppet Regina-- despite rebellion against prorogation ending 14 Oct 2019 until further notice. Jo Maugham QC has ventured Tue, 24 Sep.

Labour is now, 22-25 Sep, while SCOTUK is "poised to rule against Boris Johnson, according to the Guardian. First draw may well be fortunate for Labour to sweep the crazy bits under the rug before parliament returns to session and super critical constitutional crisis management--such as CRAFTING party platform for the poll as yet scheduled on or before expiry of the latest "A.50(3) extension period," 11.00pm on 31 January 2020.

Corbyn on collision course with Labour members over Brexit, according to Guardian

Before a crucial vote on Monday on whether the party should explicitly back remain in any election, Labour's autumn conference descended into factional rows over its Brexit policy, with rebellious MPs privately threatening another leadership challenge.

Corbyn moved to stamp his authority on Labour's Brexit position by proposing a delay to deciding how the party should campaign at a second referendum [?].

Mind the pronouns
When asked if it was in Britain's long-term interests to remain in the EU, the Labour leader suggested a Labour Brexit deal could be preferable in some circumstances: "It depends on the agreement you have with the European Union outside."

The new position caused a fresh revolt among several shadow ministers and pro-remain activists, adding to the febrile mood at the Brighton conference following an abortive attempt by Jon Lansman, the Momentum chair, to abolish Tom Watson's job as deputy leader and the resignation of Corbyn's key policy aide, Andrew Fisher.

wut
Emily Thornberry, the shadow foreign secretary, also made clear her unhappiness with the position, saying Labour risked getting stuck in a "crusher" between leave and remain with the "walls coming in" unless it picks a side before an election. She said a new direction in favour of remain needed to be decided by activists at this conference, not in a future one after an election.
I've no idea whether UK law or "convention" would accommodate a four-day session with 5-day recess for the minority "government" conference. If no, parliament will have recovered 12 days nearly lost to MPs seeking "a deal" because of perfidious prorogation. Give us a clue.

The Conservative Party ho-down is scheduled 29 Sep-3 Oct, and its schedule of events for 100 or so conniving bastids is rich with swag and public frauds.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 03:24:31 AM EST
Europe switched to 12-hour clock or is that a S. Bannon tell?

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 03:35:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Britain to create £1 bln fund for clean energy technology
The Ayrton Fund, named after British physicist and suffragette Hertha Ayrton, will consist of aid money for British and foreign scientists and engineers to develop new clean energy technology in partnership with developing countries.

"If we get this right, future generations will look back on climate change as a problem that we solved by determined global action and the prowess of technology," Johnson said in a statement ahead of his visit to New York.

an angle to everything, eh.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 08:54:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
theres a lot of clean technology available, little of which the UK is implementing.

The tories have kept fuel duty static since they came in, while removing all start up subisides for green energy schemes. Even electric cars only form 0.2% of UK vehicles, which given the congestion in major cities is criminal negligence. In Norway it's nearly 7%

Boris is a bullshitter. Nothing he says can be taken seriously unless it is likely to be flattering and/or excessively profitable to him or his friends.

Like Trump, he lies; not because he is cornered and feels he has to but because lies are his superpower. Without them, he is just another gasbag


keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 06:51:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I do have to wonder, idly, if HRM's tenure is indicative of HRM's secret ahhh political agenda. Lock 'n' load Tories come hell or high water.

Is it "convention," act of parliament, or "absolute and judicially unchallengeable power to refuse ... assent to a [Retirement, Ma'am or Term Limit] Bill" that keeps HRM on the throne rather than abdicate to HRM's heir apparent? landssakes.

Edward VIII quit. Juan Carlos I quit. Akihito just quit.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 09:52:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think HRM ever quite trusted Bonny Prince Charlie to be up to the job and so clung on in the hope the succession might pass him by and go straight to Prince William. She may also have wished to avoid the fate of the Queen Mother reduced to a life of dressing up, the odd tipple, and boring parties. Given she has almost zero discretionary power, I don't know if it matters an awful lot which century she lives in. She adds a veneer of respectability to the truly tawdry business of UK government and the appearance of constitutionality to the unconstitutional. Best to create a real elected Head of State role with real powers.

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 10:40:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I would point out an advantage of having a separate, non-administrative monarch. In Britain, and many other countries, there is a PM and a queen (or president), while in the US there is only a president.

That means that two important functions of national leadership can be separated in most countries. There is the pomp and circumstance part of government, with parades and fancy dress balls and photo ops and meetings with movie stars, and there is the technical working part of government, with boring committee meetings and complex behind-the-scenes policy decisionmaking. Having the Queen and her entourage on the front page of the tabloids is good, because it allows the PM to work* on actually running the government. In the US, the two jobs are combined, and the POTUS has to alternate between public relations and administration.

*Certain current PMs excluded.

by asdf on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 02:24:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"He's doing our work for us, in a certain respect," said the speaker of the House.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 05:49:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think she agreed, not because boris pulled the wool oer her eyes (I'm quite sure she knew he was lying) but because Andrew was getting inconvenient headlines and a constitutional scandal was likely to push him off the front pages. She has her own game planners with far more experience than Dominic Cummings. And her scheme worked perfectly.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 06:55:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's more like it.

She wasn't born yesterday.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 07:03:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
IT'S A TRAP!

Britain's Labour votes in favor of Corbyn's Brexit [WIDE] stance

backing his bid to hold an election and then decide whether to campaign to remain in or leave the European Union in a new referendum. In a show of hands, Labour voted in favor of Corbyn's stance.
Bid to FORCE Britain's Labour to immediately back remaining in EU fails
In a show of hands, members at the party's annual conference voted against a motion brought by EU supporters to force the party to adopt a so-called "remain" position now before an election and possible second referendum.
Dave 2012
"Clearly all futures for Britain are imaginable. We are in charge of own destiny, we can make our own choices. I believe the choice we should make is to stay in the European Union, to be members of the single market, to maximise our impact in Europe, but where we are unhappy with parts of the relationship we shouldn't be frightened of standing up and saying so."


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 07:33:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
IT'S A TRAP!

Brexit: Labour delegates back Corbyn and reject plan to commit now to remain - as it happened

Rolling coverage of the Labour conference in Brighton
  • Corbyn's Brexit victory in Labour conference vote - Snap analysis
  • McDonnell says Labour would introduce 32-hour working week
  • How the Labour plan to move to 32-hour working week might work
  • McDonnell says Labour would expand public services available for free
chumps. They must have SECURED a fantastic group rate for the Tory conference.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 08:53:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
IT'S A TRAP!

UK's Labour Party backs leader; to stay neutral on Brexit

The series of three votes leaves the party's position somewhat ambiguous, reflecting the fact that the membership in general prefers to stay in the EU while Corbyn and some in his inner circle prefer not to take a CLEAR stance.

If unchanged, it means that the party would not take an active "remain" or "leave" position if there is another referendum on the question of EU membership, and would seek to remain neutral in a national election.
[...]
Their complicated scenario calls for the party to win an election, take power, negotiate a new deal with the EU, schedule a referendum on whether to endorse the new deal or remain in the EU, then hold a special party conference to determine the party's position on the matter.

brill

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Sep 23rd, 2019 at 09:00:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I assume that is just a restatement of the letter? Would be silly if you promise to negotiate a deal and then campaign against it from the outset.
by generic on Tue Sep 24th, 2019 at 07:30:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What letter?

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Tue Sep 24th, 2019 at 12:15:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by generic on Tue Sep 24th, 2019 at 04:08:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"purdah rules"?
wtf. I'm not thinned-skinned, but that idiom epitomizes just how atavistic and crass post-colonial British culture is.

Second, under what rock was Corbyn hiding in '15 that he needed to solict government advice? "While it's likely the issue will be contested in courts ...":omfg. "The government remains in office but there are conventional  constraints on what it can do during that period" when parliament is dissolved.(Miller (Appellant) v. Prime Minister. 24.09.2019)

Third, what is his "deal"? He doesn't mention. Where is his new, mo' better than Boris "non-paper" deal with the EU he knows will rally the plebs to PV and the MPs to NCV with "alternative arrangements" that satisfy EU customs regulation?

Y'all have lost the plot.

archived
The end of "progress"

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Wed Sep 25th, 2019 at 02:59:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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