Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.

LQD: Bozzer's next move

by john_evans Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 04:00:41 PM EST

It was becoming clear that voting no confidence in the government could be a trap (an "elephant trap" said Blair). A better tactic would be to hang Boris out to dry as a PM with an extremely precarious majority. There has been discussion of this among Labour pols, with Corbyn saying he didn't want to rule out an early election. Evidently, Bozzymandias saw the danger coming:

Speculation is mounting that Boris Johnson could call a snap general election if backbench rebels succeed in passing a bill to delay Brexit, with a Downing Street source saying the issue would be treated as "an expression of confidence" in the government.

Johnson's cabinet ministers are being summoned for an emergency cabinet meeting on Monday afternoon, before the prime minister addresses Conservative MPs at a No 10 drinks reception.

Senior sources among the cross-party group of rebels say they believe Johnson could seek a snap general election as early as Wednesday, asking for the two-thirds majority needed in the Commons under the Fixed-term Parliaments Act.

The sources suggested the vote would come with a commitment that polling day would be before 31 October, though the date would ultimately be in the control of the government.

During the electoral period, of course, the government is not expected to do anything more than tend to current business. A passive no deal would not, apparently, be seen as pursuing a controversial political goal. Right?

Over to Corbyn. He could snuff this out by depriving Bozzer of his two-thirds majority...

Will he, won't he?


Display:
I'm much afraid that Corbyn may overestimate his chances of winning an election against a simple demagogic People v Parliament (or elites, same thing) framing.

He should make Johnson sweat.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 04:15:56 PM EST
That's OK.
At the "end of the day," both gov, HoC, and polity need desperately to own their failures before UK properly comprehends the mistakes made and necessary remedial action to achieve a desirable political goal.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 04:55:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"At the end of the day" is a comforting concept we get from tales, stories, fiction, movies...

In history, there are no rounded conclusions/resolutions. Just another round of fucking up the business of dealing with the fuck-ups our elders left us.

See: WW2. "Never again!" they said. Just look around us now...

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 08:53:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
practice, practice, practice

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Wed Sep 4th, 2019 at 09:33:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I suspect the threat to call an election is more calculated to scare independent MPs and dissident Tory MPs who may get de-selected into voting against any legislative move against a no deal Brexit. It may very well work too, because ChangeUK MPs (for example) have almost no chance of being re-elected absent an electoral pact giving them a free run against a Boris candidate..

But the threat empowers Corbyn as well. He can threaten to support the call for an election unless dissident MPs are prepared to back a caretaker Government of national unity instead. He can offer them an electoral pact in return for doing so. In which case the election could take place in the Spring after an a.50 extension has been secured, and perhaps a second referendum won.

For Boris, this is all about staying in control of events, calling the shots, taking the initiative. He does not want to look like Theresa May, haplessly at the mercy of the ERG and everyone else. He has to sound bullish about an election, even if he doesn't want one.

I suspect only an electoral pact amongst the opposition parties can stop him now, and that has to be a long shot. What the dissidents actually badly need is an alternative PM they can all rally around, they just don't realise yet, how badly they need it.

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 08:04:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You've got to have a horse to win a horse race. But you need to have the most votes to get the first chance to form a government, and you need to get a majority + 10 or so to have a reasonably stable government. If there is a split within the Conservative Party it would certainly make it difficult for a BREXIT government to be formed. It would seem more likely that there would have to be a coalition of 'no hard BREXIT' parties.

If Boris can be stymied in his attempt at a crash out, that could be fatal to the Leave constituency. So, is there any conceivable alternative to having Labour be the lead party in forming a new government after an election is called and BREXIT has failed?

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 10:31:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I agree that it seems likely this is an attempt to bring Tory dissidents to heel. More bluster from Bozzer. However, in the form of a very serious speech on the steps of N° 10.

That could well be a welcome sign that he is floundering somewhat. He can't pull serious speeches on the steps of N° 10 every day. He's using up his ammunition.

The more it becomes apparent to those who are paying attention that Bozzer cannot be taken seriously, the better the chances of him being beaten in an election.

Corbyn is repeating that he welcomes an election, which doesn't surprise me. Other voices in Labour don't seem so eager. Preventing No-deal is what comes first, they say. It's true that going into electoral mode will probably blow up agreement on a cross-party No-deal platform. So let's say that sowing discord among the cross-party plotters is a second hoped-for effect of Bozzer's speech.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 08:41:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Labour is backing away from granting Boris Johnson the 14 October general election he is threatening, fearing a "trick" that will end in a no-deal Brexit.

Jeremy Corbyn will only deliver the two-thirds Commons majority required to trigger a snap poll if legislation to block a no deal is "locked down" first, the party says.

Labour also fears Mr Johnson could be handed the election - and only then switch the date to after 31 October, when the UK would have left the EU.

"We are not daft enough to see a tactic dictated by PM Johnson which is designed to land us with a no-deal Brexit and to fall for that," said Tony Lloyd, the shadow Northern Ireland secretary.

And Corbyn says..?

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 09:23:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Jeremy Corbyn said Labour was prepared to work with other parties to stop a no-deal Brexit.  -  Guardian

Labour leader previews manifesto plans and says no deal would be gift to Trump

Jeremy Corbyn has put his party on a general election footing while renewing his pledge to block a no-deal Brexit in parliament this week.

In a wide-ranging speech that focused heavily on the party's manifesto pledges and support for the north of England, the Labour leader said his priority was to legislate to stop no deal by teaming up with other parties.

However, he raised speculation that he would back an election in any circumstances, even if Boris Johnson was to call one. In an off-camera remark to Sky News at the event in Salford, he said: "Of course, we are the opposition party, we want a general election."

Boris is running a FUD campaign. Blair likely is fearing a Labour victory and trying to ward it off with the 'elephant trap' scare tactic. Corbyn, meanwhile, is focusing on the distressed midlands communities and promising help. My question is: "What is the popular attitude in the midlands towards Trump?" Trump made a serious effort to identify himself with Boris at the G7.

The electorate has had three years to reconsider Brexit. The risks of Brexit are now much better understood. The Conservative Party is more divided than ever on Brexit. Will Trumboris be able to turn back the tide of Remain sentiment that has grown since 2016? Will the Conservative Party formally split into two parties, one for Brexit, the other for Remain? How likely is a larger under 40 voter turnout this time? It would be a pity to fail even to try to stop Brexit just because you fear you might fail.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 05:00:39 PM EST
"It would be a pity to fail even to try to stop Brexit"

Corbyn has never looked much like he was really against Brexit...

As for Trump, he probably repulses more British voters than he attracts.

As for electoral chances, the date is vital. If after a crash-out, the Brexit Party will go pop and the Tories will pick up the pieces, sufficient for them to win a Parliamentary majority in a FPTP system.

If before (a "government source" now says 14 October for the election) the Brexit Party would tear a chunk off the Tories' vote and make a Labour victory possible.

But Pfeffle just loves his role of keeping people guessing. Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt, as you say.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 06:41:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Boris is a true soul mate to Trump.


"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 06:46:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 07:51:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Corbyn has come out against a no-deal Brexit. But is there any relatively sure way to stop a default no deal BREXIT other than replacing Boris? Could Parliament pass legislation that would actually prevent a no deal exit? It was only when the Parliamentarians became convinced that the only way to stop Charles I was to cut off his head that they made any real progress, even if it was a bloody slog for the next few years.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 07:01:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Doesn't look good at all ... Dominic Cummings in full control.

Presidentialization in the United Kingdom Prime Ministerial Power and Parliamentary Democracy

Abstract

Prime Ministerial Chief Executives can access theoretical and practical, formal and informal power resources that extend their authority in government. Studies of executive politics in the UK are best served by `bringing the Prime Minister back in', applying a theory of `presidentialization' rooted in a centre-periphery model of a semi-pluralist but definitively hierarchical executive. Here, with regard to actors and institutions, power is relational, but also locational in an executive within which the Prime Minister (as both actor and institution) is sited at the apex of the hierarchy.

Invariably subject to intra-executive and executive-legislature relations, Prime Ministerial influence is contingent on transient institutional and personal resource factors. These include electoral strength, political base, success, and a favourable profile, resources in turn determined by parliamentary majority, policy record, backbench and frontbench popularity, party popularity, electoral rating, news media profile, and personalisation, the ever-growing association of political processes with political personalities. To date the `command premiership' demonstrates the centrality the Prime Minister can enjoy in British government. The parliamentary executive in Britain exercises considerably more powers to govern than does the presidential executive in the U.S. The Prime Minister commands considerable authority within the executive, he or she will possess as much executive power and far more legislative authority than does the U.S. President.

    'You're either a weak Prime Minister, in which case they'll knock you for that, or if you appear to have a clear sense of direction, and know what you want to do, then you are a quasi-dictator. And all this President Blair rubbish, it's absolute rubbish.' Tony Blair, The Observer, 5 September 1999.

    "They have got to know I'm running the show."Tony Blair, quoted in The Sunday Times, 26 April 1988

Even with devolution of power to Scotland and Wales, Britain remains to all extents and purposes a unitary, centralised parliamentary democracy with a majoritarian non-proportional electoral system, a two and a half rather than a multi party system, and a legislature which is effectively unicameral. This non-consensual, non-coalitional, hierarchical political regime produces single party government and provides the executive with considerable power and authority. Majoritarian government is a continuing feature of Britain's 'Westminster Model', and is the key factor in a creeping presidentialization which, within limits, under certain conditions and subject to ebbs and flows, has facilitated the growth of Prime Ministerial power within their party, the legislature and the executive in recent years.

A short animation that introduces the UK Parliament, looking at its history and how it works today.

UK Parliament

Global Warming - distance between America and Europe is steadily increasing.

by Oui on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 05:33:44 PM EST
"presidentialization" formerly-known-as "unitary executive theory", formerly-known-as "monarchy"

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 06:08:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 06:26:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
At this point "Parliament works" is one of those great oxymorons ranking up there with "Microsoft Works".
by rifek on Wed Sep 4th, 2019 at 09:28:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The prime minister will ask MPs to back a general election for 14 October should a cross-party rebel alliance vote to take control of parliament tomorrow, according to a government source.


Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 06:26:23 PM EST
< wipes tears >

[INSERT [PROROGUE [MEANINGFUL VOTE] PARLIAMENT] FLOW CHART ]

I want everybody to know - there are no circumstances in which I will ask Brussels to delay. We are leaving on 31 October, no ifs or buts.


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 06:39:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What I said yesterday has no bearing on what I say today or what I will say tomorrow.

The modern world requires flexibility.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 06:45:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
paraphrasing Trump, Bliar, or Bojo?

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 07:33:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Answer D:  All of the above?
by Bernard on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 08:57:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"When I use a word, it means just what I choose it to mean...."
by rifek on Wed Sep 4th, 2019 at 09:32:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 06:45:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If Boris has to kick the BREXIT can down the road to 2020 he is probably doomed. Impatience by Leave voters will turn to exasperation and disillusionment. Corbyn would only have to await a propitious time to call for a VOC. But Labour should pursue a non-competition pact with Remain Tories anyway. Splitting the Conservative Party into two parties could only be a good thing longer term.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 06:53:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
2020? Like 31 Dec 2020? Here's the thing.

If HoC had ratified WA (alias "May's deal") on or before 31 March 2019, errybuddy would have got their SAFE SPACE to play in.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 08:06:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not really, because that time was to be used to negotiate a comprehensive trade deal, and there is no way that could be done by 2021. And even if they could, there is no trade deal that would keep the Irish Border open, so they would still have the backstop issue to resolve. Brexit is simply a gift that keeps on giving...

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 08:27:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Am I to understand then, the WA would merely DELAY purge of the eejits in parliament and the polity?

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 11:04:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It will certainly delay some things, but whether it can purge the eejits in parliament is asking rather a lot...

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 12:13:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There are plenty of worse eejits waiting for their turn.
Beware of what you wish for.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 01:56:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Boris Johnson secretly agreed to suspend parliament in mid-August, explosive court documents reveal - nearly two weeks before denying the plan existed.

An email was sent to the prime minister and Dominic Cummings, his chief aide, entitled "Ending The Session", which says "we should prorogue" from 9 September.

It was revealed in Edinburgh's Court of Session, which is hearing a legal challenge to stop parliament being shut down for five weeks, preventing MPs making any further moves on the Brexit crisis.

Three days before the shock prorogation plan was announced last week, Downing Street strongly denied any such intention to send MPs home.

Well, yeah. So well-timed, the "sudden" decision: loads of bigwigs still swilling Chianti in Tuscany or lolling on beach towels (somewhere in the EU), while the Queen is at Balmoral far from her usual staff (and no, she thinks twitter is what birds do). So she is rapidly advised by a meeting of her Privy Council. (This does not meet where it seems to say.)

The Privy Council is a huge boondoggle of 702 members, some judiciary (it still partly functions as a high court for some cases), all supposed to advise the monarch.

Oddly, for 702 members, its quorum is 3. So only 3 people were ready and waiting to go to Balmoral and advise the Queen immediately after Bozzer's "shock" announcement: the Lord High President of the Council, who is none other than J. Ree-Smogg; the Leader of the House of Lords, Baroness Evans (curses), and the Tory Chief Whip in the Commons, Mark Spencer.

Three top Tories primed and ready to advise Her Majesty that Bojo's plan was simply wizard. The Royal Consent was given immediately.

No conflicting voices. Corbyn could have been there, he's a Privy Councillor. John Bercow could have been there to say it was a "constitutional outrage", he's a Privy Councillor. But no, it was a stitch-up from the start.

Of course it was prepared in advance.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 01:30:31 PM EST
So what if Corbyn and a couple of sympathetic privy councillors fetch up in Balmoral and advise the Queen to sack Boris? Is she bound to take any old advice from any of the 702? If Boris loses the vote today - which he claims is equivalent to a confidence vote - would they not be justified in saying he has lost the confidence of the house and must be sacked?

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 01:43:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think you get the point. The whole thing was prepared in advance keeping the advisors down to three who would strongly advise that Bozzer's prorogation was just fine. And it wasn't a question of sacking Boris, it was a question of giving prorogation an air of legitimacy.

Who knew that the Queen had been advised in that fashion? I didn't see it anywhere, I had to search.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 01:51:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I saw it on TV - Rees Smugg and co. interviewed at the airport - "totally normal constitutional procedure". My point is - if they can do it, why not three privy councils allied to Corbyn? - just as soon as the House passes the anti-no deal law.

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 02:11:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I imagine it's the Lord High President of the Privy Council's call who is invited, ie Smogg. Who only became LHPOTPC very recently. We can guess why he was given that job, Mrs Windsor probably finds him extremely distinguished.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 04:38:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Corbyn has asked to meet the Queen on numerous occasions now.

The answer has always been "no".

Which is where it gets interesting. Because now that Johnson has lost his majority and has said he considers SO24 a confidence vote, either the Queen is going to have to arrange an unfortunate accident for Mr Corbyn, or she's going to have to meet him as a potential Prime Minister in the not too distant.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 03:54:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
For unfortunate accidents, she can always call on one's husband.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 04:38:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Phillip Lee quits Tories, leaving government without a majority - Guardian
Former minister defects to Lib Dems, accusing Boris Johnson of pursuing a `damaging Brexit'
Boris Johnson has seen his one-vote Commons majority vanish before his eyes, as a statement by the prime minister to parliament was undermined by the very public defection of the Conservative MP Phillip Lee to the Liberal Democrats.

The stunt, in which the pro-remain Bracknell MP walked across the chamber to the Lib Dem benches flanked by two of his new colleagues, happened as Johnson updated the Commons on last month's G7 summit, a statement devoted mainly to Brexit.
....
MPs will vote on Tuesday evening on whether to take control of the order paper to allow the passage of the bill. Johnson has promised to seek a general election if they do so.

Calling Boris's bluff.

Should Parliament pass a proposed bill requiring that the Government request a delay if there is no agreed withdrawal plan by Oct 15 this could scupper Boris's plans. It could force him to resign by October 15. If not there would be a clear constitutional crisis. My question is: Given such a law and no deal by Oct 15 would the EU be justified in extending the date regardless of the actions of the PM. Who is sovereign - the PM or Parliament?

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 04:53:10 PM EST
A notorious homophobe and austerity enthusaist, his welcome into the LibDems shatters their claim to still be a socially or economically progressive party.

Swinson herself has voted with the tories more often that Gove has.

I said months ago that the formal tory party will split, the brexit ultras will forge an alliance with Farage's brexit party, the rump will either resign at the next election or drift in their ones and twos into Swinson's increasingly conservative right wing party. The LibDems are becoming the new Conservative party, the brexit tories may never end their right wing drift until they are in the full embarce of Farage or ukip.


keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 09:13:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It should be noted that scores of LibDem members have already announced their resignation in protest at Lee's membership.


keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 09:14:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Where will they go? To Labour?

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Sep 4th, 2019 at 12:05:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't know. Don't care.

Most of them were perfectly A-OK with supporting Tory austerity and racism, so I'd hope they'd find no welcome in the Labour party

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Sep 4th, 2019 at 08:26:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Economically the LibDems are neolib, which is nothing but regressive.  The gift to the rentier class that keeps on giving.  And while they've paid lip service to social causes, they've had no problem voting to hold the color line, as you noted.  If you sleep with dogs, you wake up with fleas, and all these leavers are likely to find out what it's like to be held at arm's length.  I think they will need to prove they are not personally as "morally flexible" as their erstwhile party.
by rifek on Wed Sep 4th, 2019 at 09:44:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In playing hardball, Boris Johnson may be underrating his rivals

Party discipline has been fraying at the edges throughout the many months of this fractious hung parliament.

But by threatening to impose the severest sanction - permanent expulsion - on rebels, Johnson is effectively challenging them to choose between what they believe to be the national interest, and any political future inside their party. The stakes could not be higher.

It should come as no surprise that Johnson is playing hardball, for two reasons.

First, any prime minister would struggle to accept a piece of legislation that binds their hands quite so comprehensively - even specifying the wording of the letter he must write to the EU27 to secure an article 50 extension.

Yes, MPs are dealing with weighty issues, in a hung parliament, against the backdrop of extraordinary political ferment. But Johnson could hardly claim to be in power if this legislation passed: MPs would have shown they have no confidence in him, even if no formal vote of no confidence had been tabled.

Second, the leavers' reading of Theresa May's premiership was that she tended to underestimate the determination of the Brexiters, and overestimate the willingness of the "rebels" - the ex-remainers - to cross the floor. Ultimately, they believe Dominic Grieve and his pals are the soft underbelly of the Tory party, and are likely to fold.

Who really trusts Boris? And Boris seems not to know he needs to wear a helmet when he is at bat.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 05:11:11 PM EST
the real problem they face is that,as I mentioned a few weeks back, they've spent their whole lives being told by their sycophants that they're super bright people.

But that's just in their world of frankly ordinary, but well educated rich people of no great talent, but fantastically good connections. If you believe that wealth is a reward for hard work and talent, then talentless peolle end up being arrogant dullards.

Boris is no dullard (although Rees-Mogg is fantastically dim), but he's not the brightest guy in the room (to quote a phrase) and neither is Cummings. and they're being found out.

they really thought they could out plan and out think everybody. But as Bill Maher once said "you can't call yourself a think-tank if all your ideas are stupid"

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 10:25:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But others can call you a stupid think tank.


"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Sep 4th, 2019 at 12:08:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Tomorrow's headlines ...

Boris Johnson secretly agreed to suspend parliament two weeks before denying it would happen, Downing St documents reveal | The Independent - 3 hrs ago |

Boris Johnson secretly agreed to suspend parliament in mid-August, explosive court documents reveal - nearly two weeks before denying the plan existed.

An email was sent to the prime minister and Dominic Cummings, his chief aide, entitled "Ending The Session", which says "we should prorogue" from 9 September.

It was revealed in Edinburgh's Court of Session, which is hearing a legal challenge to stop parliament being shut down for five weeks, preventing MPs making any further moves on the Brexit crisis.

Three days before the shock prorogation plan was announced last week, Downing Street strongly denied any such intention to send MPs home.

But the documents disclosed to the court include a hand-written note from Mr Johnson, dated 16 August, arguing "the whole September sessions is a rigmarole", dismissing its importance.

The prime minister's words read: "I don't see anything shocking about this decision" to prorogue. The word "yes" is also written on the document.

There was no immediate comment from Downing Street about the documents, which again shine the spotlight on the prime minister's honesty.



Global Warming - distance between America and Europe is steadily increasing.
by Oui on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 05:52:01 PM EST
From Guardian live stream with Andrew Sparrow  at 17:11 GMT
MPs back move to allow bill to block no-deal Brexit by majority of 27

MPs have backed the motion to allow a debate on a bill tomorrow that would prevent a no-deal Brexit on 31 October by 328 votes to 301 - a majority of 27.




"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 09:26:50 PM EST
Now just prevent an election before an extension is requested and granted.


"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Sep 3rd, 2019 at 09:28:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If Boris tables a motion under the Fixed Term Parliaments Act, he will only get the required 2/3 majority for it if there is certainty of an extension being requested.

Last wizard wheeze, he might claim he has lost the confidence of the HOC and start running the 14-day clock. It looks as if enough determination has been shown for a caretaker government to be formed in that case.

Boris took a beating yesterday.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Wed Sep 4th, 2019 at 06:06:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Boris Johnson announced he will seek to trigger a snap election after 21 Conservative MPs rebelled during a crunch vote.

MPs voted in favour of allowing a cross-party alliance to take control of the Commons agenda on Wednesday in a bid to block a no-deal Brexit on 31 October by 328 votes to 301.

Analysis of the Commons division list showed 21 Tories rebelled to support the motion on Tuesday night.

The government has said the whip will be withdrawn from all of those who rebelled.

Shortly after the results were announced, the prime minister said he would table a motion under the Fixed-term Parliaments Act.



Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Wed Sep 4th, 2019 at 06:01:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Then Parliament had better get busy finding a new PM. It is pretty clear that no legal mandate that has to be carried out by Boris can be trusted. Why waste precious time proving that thesis?

Do I take it correctly that the vote Tuesday and the tabling by Boris under the Fixed Term Act means that the HOC could select a new PM any time they can muster a majority to do so?

And what is happening with the three court cases contesting prorogation? I see nothing in the papers.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Sep 4th, 2019 at 07:08:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Brexit: Judge rejects parliament shutdown legal challenge
The case was brought to the Court of Session in Edinburgh by a cross-party group of 75 parliamentarians, who argued the PM had exceeded his powers.

But Lord Doherty ruled on Wednesday that the issue was for politicians and voters to judge, and not the courts.

He said there had been no contravention of the law by the UK government.

smells like "SCOTUS won't touch it">, case or controversey clause

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Wed Sep 4th, 2019 at 08:16:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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